Wednesday, June 02, 2021

Two Online Events at Columbia University's Earth Institute

 The Earth Institute at Columbia University does online events four or five times a week that are open to the public:

https://www.earth.columbia.edu/articles/view/1774

Here are two upcoming events that may be of interest:

Sustain What? Digging in on a Global Plan for Ecological Restoration
Friday, June 4, 2021 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM
Online 
Please click here for more information and viewing options.
Add to CalendarShareEvent URL
Through human-driven climate change and ecological disruption, the world is in the midst of an extraordinary environmental crisis. Yet much can be done to turn the environmental tide.

Join a globe-spanning conversation with scientists and policy experts as we explore specific paths to recovery, restoration and a thriving future. 

This Sustain What conversation, hosted by Dale Willman of the Columbia Climate School examines specific goals of the United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration, which aims to halt and reverse the degradation of ecosystems on every continent and in every ocean.

Learn more about the U.N. Decade on Ecosystem Restoration:
https://www.decadeonrestoration.org/

Sustain What is a conversation series pursuing paths to progress where complexity and consequence collide. Explore all episodes on YouTube: http://j.mp/sustainwhatplaylist

Send feedback, ideas for future episodes or support us at this link:
http://j.mp/sustainwhatfeedback

Please click the link above for more information and viewing options.
Event Contact Information: 
Andy Revkin
ar667@columbia.edu

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Maya Lin
Thursday, June 10, 2021 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM
Online Event 
More Information
Add to CalendarShareEvent URL
Renowned artist and designer Maya Lin presents new and major works. 

Introduced by Carol Becker, Dean of Columbia University School of the Arts. Followed by a conversation with Andrew Revkin, The Earth Institute. 

Mapping the Future adds to Lin’s ongoing project, What is Missing?, which “creates, through science–based artworks, an awareness about the present sixth mass extinction of species, connects this loss of species to habitat degradation and loss, and emphasizes that by protecting and restoring habitat, we can both reduce carbon emissions and protect species.”

On display May 10–November 14 in Madison Square Park, Ghost Forest is a “towering stand of forty-nine haunting Atlantic white cedar trees. Lin brings her vision as an artist and her agency as an environmental activist to this project, a memory of germination, vegetation, and abundance and a harsh symbol of the devastation of climate change. The height of each tree, around forty feet, overwhelms human scale and stands as a metaphor of the outsized impact of a looming environmental calamity.”

In 2009, Maya Lin was awarded the National Medal of Arts, the nation’s highest honor for artistic excellence. In 2016, President Barack Obama awarded Lin the Presidential Medal of Freedom, praising her for a celebrated career in both art and architecture, and for creating the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, a sacred place of healing in the US capital.

Co-presented by The Forum, The Center for the Study of Social Difference, Columbia University School of the Arts, Columbia World Projects, and The Earth Institute.

Event Contact Information: 
The Forum
2128536786
theforum@columbia.edu

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With most events having migrated online, it would be possible to do a global listing of energy, environment, climate... events these days.  I'd be up for helping with such a venture if there were others involved.  I won't do it alone.

Sunday, September 13, 2020

Energy (and Other) Events - September 13, 2020

 I am thinking of stopping Energy (and Other) Events (http://hubevents.blogspot.com), the free weekly listing service I’ve done for more than the last decade.  I’m losing interest, the environmental community has never been interested, and I’ve failed to interest anyone in automating those parts of the process that could be automated, even while I’ve expanded my reach to the global since now everything is online.  


No blame as my old martial arts teacher, a disgruntled Postal worker, taught me long ago that “Nobody cares” and, as an anarchistic, syncretistic Taoist Buddhist, I know down to the marrow of my bones that I came from nothing, I go towards nothing, and there is, ultimately, nothing behind everything.  This thought gives me the great joy of freedom.

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Energy (and Other) Events is a weekly mailing list published most Sundays covering events around the Cambridge, MA and greater Boston area that catch the editor's eye.

Hubevents  http://hubevents.blogspot.com is the web version.

If you wish to subscribe or unsubscribe to Energy (and Other) Events email gmoke@world.std.com
What I Do and Why I Do It:  The Story of Energy (and Other) Events
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-i-do-and-why-i-do-it.html

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Since almost all events are online now, Energy (and Other) Events is now virtual and can happen anywhere in the world.  If you know of online events that are happening which may be of interest to the editor of this publication, please let me know. People are connecting all across the world and I’d be more than happy to help facilitate more of that.

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Mutual Aid Networks

National
Spreadsheet of mutual aid networks
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/u/1/d/1HEdNpLB5p-sieHVK-CtS8_N7SIUhlMpY6q1e8Je0ToY/htmlview

Mutual Aid Networks to Combat Coronavirus
https://itsgoingdown.org/c19-mutual-aid/

Local
Boston COVID-19 Community Care
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/15GYuPYEzBk9KIyH3C3419aYxIMVAsa7BL7nBl9434Mg/edit?usp=sharing

Boston + MA COVID19 Resources
(This is a different Google Doc with a similar name, compiled by the Asian
American Resource Workshop)
https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-x6vOZKVsla5H363mtdgcyivvLmcx7-f2s6l-O_ba8A/edit?usp=sharing

Cambridge Mutual Aid Network
https://sites.google.com/view/cambridge-nan/home

Mutual Aid Medford and Somerville (MAMAS) network
https://docs.google.com/document/u/0/d/1RtYZ1wc8jxcSKDl555WszWhQWlOlSkNnfjIOYV0wXRA/mobilebasic

Food for Free (for Cambridge and Somerville) volunteers to provide lunches for schoolchildren, elderly, and hungry
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSed0cSIoOc7-Fvoms3VHR1Lc44fjql-vTNknz_a-7T_sKDnrw/viewform

My notes to Rebecca Solnit’s A Paradise Built in Hell:  The Extraordinary Communities That Arise in Disaster, about how people faced with emergency and disaster usually move towards providing mutual aid, at least until elite panic, a term in disaster studies, kicks in, are available at http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2016/07/notes-on-rebecca-solnits-paradise-built.html

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Details of these events are available when you scroll past the index

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Monday, September 14 - Friday, September 18
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Proof of Concept 

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Monday, September 14
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8am  Stories of Change: Transforming food and the things we buy
9am  Climate Change, Our Faith Values, and 2020: A Conversation Between Dr. Katharine Hayhoe and Rev. Susan Hendershot
9am  Beyond reopening: A leapfrog moment to transform education?
12pm  Short-Circuiting Policy: Interest Groups and the Battle over Clean Energy and Climate Policy in the American States
12pm  The 2020 U.S. Presidential Election: Politics, Economics, and Strategy
1pm  Overground Railroad: The Green Book and the Roots of Black Travel
5:30pm  The Boston Red Sox and WWII
7pm  Science and Cooking Public Lecture: The Science of Sugar
7pm  Connecting the Dots: Capitalism, Climate Catastrophe and the Carceral State

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Tuesday, September 15
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6am  HOW RACISM ERODES MIND, BODY AND SPIRIT, AND HOW TO HEAL AND LEARN
8am  Stories of Change: Transforming travel and energy
9:30am  COMPROMISED: PETER STRZOK AND THE INVESTIGATION OF DONALD TRUMP
10am  Outlook for global energy and climate trends post-Covid-19
11am  Yamiche Alcindor
12pm  Reporting environmental challenges and stories of indigenous communities
12pm  Beyond Rights: Intersectional Disabled Movements & Disability Justice for Our Future
12pm  JOVRNALISM: Hijacking a Dancing Hot Dog for the Future of Journalism
12:15pm  Could Climate Change Increase the Risk of Mold in Housing?
12:30pm  MIT Press Live! Entanglements Author Talk
1pm  Quantifying Social & Environmental Impact for Investors, with Catherine Griffin
1pm  Tech & Climate Change
2pm  Imagining the Next Global Economy
4pm  Perfecters of this Democracy:  Conversation with Nikole Hannah-Jones:  Radcliffe Institute 20th Anniversary Lecture
4pm  Election 2020: What Keeps You Up at Night?
4pm  Conversation on Whistleblowing, Authority, and Subversion
5pm  Psilocybin and Mystical Experience: Implications for Healthy Psychological Functioning, Spirituality, and Religion
5pm  The Tyranny of Merit:  What's Become of the Common Good?
5:30pm  Memory, Social Justice, and Mindfulness
6pm  Designing for equity and engaging diverse communities
6pm  Lowell Lecture with Kathrine Switzer: More Than Running: Changing the Course of Women’s History
7pm  Money for Nothing:  The Scientists, Fraudsters, and Corrupt Politicians Who Reinvented Money, Panicked a Nation, and Made the World Rich
7pm  Virtual: Carol Hay with Tiziana Dearing, Think Like a Feminist 
7pm  Planetary Health with Sam Myers and Living on Earth
7pm  Survival of the Friendliest 
9:30pm  CHINA’S RISE, THE DECLINE OF THE WEST, AND DEGLOBALIZATION

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Wednesday, September 16
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9am  What has COVID-19 taught us? “Build Back Better” in the Era of Sustainable Development
11am  Reset: Reclaiming the Internet for Civil Society
12pm  Kelman Seminar Series: Do Morals Matter: Presidents and Foreign Policy from FDR to Trump
12pm  The Bomb: Presidents, Generals, and the Secret History of Nuclear War
1:30pm  18th Annual Hull Wind 1 Turbine Tour
3pm  People, Power, and Profits Progressive Capitalism for an Age of Discontent
4pm  Boston New Technology CleanTech-GreenTech & Energy Startup Showcase #BNT116
5pm  Michele Goodwin in conversation with Caroline Light and Patricia Williams
6pm  A People's Guide to Greater Boston
6pm  Lessons from a Pandemic: Solutions for Addressing the Climate Change Crisis
7pm  Health and Community in Times of Crisis

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Thursday, September 17
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10am  Pandemic Response Catalyst Conversation Series: Vaccines and Therapies and the Need for Speed
11am  The Risk of Digital Discrimination: Exploring AI Bias
12pm  Harvard Circular Economy Information Session I 
12pm  RPP Webinar: Malcolm Sparrow on Fundamentals of Regulatory Design
12pm  Eat Local MA Presents: A Virtual Facility Tour of City Fresh Foods!
12pm  COVID-19 and the Stakes for Democracy in South America
1pm  Eating Our Way Out of Climate Change; In Discussion with Sarah Bridle
2pm  The 2020 State of Demand-Side Energy Management in California Webinar
4pm  Reconstructing the Polity (1870) (Online Event)
4pm  Diseases in the District of Maine 1772-1820: Epidemics Then and Now
6:30pm  Political Hobbyism vs. Political Power
6:30pm  Feminisms Unbound: The Neoliberal University and Academic Feminism
7pm  Mill Town:  Reckoning with What Remains
7pm  Queer Voices in the Climate Movement

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Friday, September 18
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12pm  Difference Without Domination:  Pursuing Justice in Diverse Democracies
1pm  Social Justice Leaders Series led by Dr. Keisha N. Blain
1pm  Jill Lepore in conversation with Fran Berman
1pm  Pioneers in Public Interest: The Battle for Voting Rights in 2020
7pm  The Butterfly Effect:  Insects and the Making of the Modern World 
8pm  Harvard Circular Economy Information Session II 

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Saturday, September 19
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1pm  Ig Informal Lectures
6:30pm  James Edward Mills joins Nature Linc for our End of Summer Celebration

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Monday, September 21 - Tuesday, September 29
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SENSE.nano Symposium: The Body at All Scales

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Monday, September 21
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12pm  Transitioning to a Low Carbon and Resilient Energy System of the Future: Key Challenges and Opportunities
12pm  Thinking Through Soil: Case Study from the Mezquital Valley
12pm  Understanding the Role of Race in Health: A Moderated Discussion
3pm  SURVEILLANCE IN AN ERA OF PANDEMIC AND PROTEST
5pm  Black Boston: Changing the Face of Politics
5:30pm  The Last Brahmin: Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. and the Making of the Cold War
7pm  Real Change:  Mindfulness to Heal Ourselves and the World

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Tuesday, September 22 & Thursday, September 24
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2020 Visions: Lunch & Learn Lightning Talks

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Tuesday, September 22 - Friday, October 1
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Collective Trauma Summit 2020:  The Power of Collective Healing

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Tuesday, September 22
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9am  Aging Brain Initiative Symposium: Cellular & Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration
3pm  Speaking Truth to Power When Power Does Not Want Truth
4pm  CLIMATE AMBITION WITH GINA MCCARTHY, ANNIE LEONARD AND TAMARA TOLES O’LAUGHLIN
4pm  On This Land: Reframing Public Memory Webinar 
5:15pm  The Horrid Deeds of our Enemies
5:30pm  Memory, Social Justice, and Mindfulness
7pm  Just Us:  An American Conversation
7:30pm  Confronting Disinformation: A Conversation with Audrey Tang
8pm  Blacker, Brighter Futures: Afrofuturism and Apocalypse

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My rough notes on some of the events I go to and notes on books I’ve read are at:
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com

Geometry Links - September 7, 2020
http://geometrylinks.blogspot.com/2020/09/geometry-links-september-7-2020.html

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Monday, September 14 - Friday, September 18
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Proof of Concept 
Monday, September 14 - Friday, September 18
MIT, Wiesner Building E15, Outside projected on the side of the building, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Art projection on campus for two weeks!

If you wander by the Wiesner building E15 at night in the next two weeks, you’ll come across a flickering projection of a few hundred pitchers.

Starting on September 4th, for two weeks, the North-facing facade of the Wiesner Building (E15) will display selected footage and documentation of Proof of Concept, an ongoing series of guerilla performances staged in the various halls, conference rooms, labs, and lobbies belonging to the nebulous phenomenon called design thinking. The projection will be visible at nighttime hours throughout this period, with special programming four nights a week (Thursday-Sunday), weather permitting. 

Proof of Concept is conceived and performed by Stratton Coffman (M.Arch ’20) and Isadora Dannin (M.Arch ’21), with support from the Transmedia Storytelling Initiative, the NuVu Research Fund, and Lord Jim. 

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Monday, September 14
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Stories of Change: Transforming food and the things we buy
Monday, September 14
8am – 9:30am EDT
Online
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/stories-of-change-transforming-food-and-the-things-we-buy-tickets-113468671852

Lessons from innovative and imaginative low carbon transformation

This free online workshop will explore how successful low-carbon initiatives can lead to permanent change and meaningful action on climate breakdown on a larger scale. We are especially interested in actions that had a ripple effect – that led to changes beyond what was initially planned or expected.

Suitable for anyone working within their community, organisation, local authority or their own daily lives to respond to the climate emergency, Stories of Change will share and celebrate the insights of people and groups who have managed to share, scale up, or amplify the impact of their activities. Join us to discover and discuss inspiring good practice and come away with fresh and practical ideas of how to bring about change.

This workshop explores stories linked to food and diet, the things we buy and use, and more.

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Climate Change, Our Faith Values, and 2020: A Conversation Between Dr. Katharine Hayhoe and Rev. Susan Hendershot
Monday, September 14
9am
Online
RSVP at https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_cFJ-Ls88RUOlTRJYxOUEXQ

Hotter temperatures, rising seas, and extreme weather events are a few of the climate impacts we can expect to worsen in years to come. At its core, climate change is profoundly unjust. It exacerbates hunger, poverty, and even political instability, disproportionately impacting the most vulnerable people of the world, the very ones we Christians are called to love and care for. 

Climate scientist and evangelical, Dr. Katharine Hayhoe, will join Rev. Susan Hendershot to discuss the latest outlook on climate change, and how to communicate the climate message effectively, from a position of shared values.

Hayhoe is a climate scientist at Texas Tech, where she co-directs the Climate Center. She is also an evangelical Christian and the wife of a pastor in Lubbock. She has been named to a number of lists including Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People, Foreign Policy’s 100 Leading Thinkers, FORTUNE magazine’s World’s Greatest Leaders, and Christianity Today as one of their 50 Women to Watch.

Join the webinar and learn effective ways to talk to your faithful friends and colleagues about the importance of caring for Creation and voting our values. 

Hosted by Interfaith Power & Light, Catholic Climate Covenant, and Young Evangelicals for Climate Action

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Beyond reopening: A leapfrog moment to transform education?
Monday, September 14
9:00 AM-11:00 AM EDT
Online
RSVP at https://www.brookings.edu/events/beyond-reopening-a-leapfrog-moment-to-transform-education/

Join the conversation on Twitter using #TransformingEdu
The COVID-19 pandemic has upended education around the world, shuttering school doors and leaving millions of children without formal access to learning. The global closure of schools is shedding renewed light on inequities that existed prior to COVID-19 and that threaten to further widen the learning gaps within and between countries.

While much attention has focused on reopening schools, the COVID-19 crisis presents a leapfrog moment to transform key elements of education systems, putting schools at the heart of social and economic recovery. New approaches by educators, parents, and even entire school systems to use education technology and other innovations are spreading across communities and bringing learning opportunities to disadvantaged young people. Given that COVID-19 is unlikely to be the last large-scale school disruption, it is imperative to build a more resilient education ecosystem, so that learning can continue when in-person instruction might not be possible. At this critical moment, it is now more important than ever to invest in innovations such as education technology and leapfrog progress—both during COVID-19 and beyond.

On September 14, the Center for Universal Education (CUE) will host a webinar to discuss strategies, including around the effective use of education technology, for ensuring resilient schools in the long term and to launch a new education technology playbook “Realizing the promise: How can education technology improve learning for all?”

George Papandreou, former prime minister of Greece, will provide opening remarks highlighting the important role of education in the recovery. Rebecca Winthrop, co-director of CUE, will moderate a panel discussion on strategies for building resilient education systems with the current Minister of Education of Sierra Leone David Sengeh, Save the Children CEO Kevin Watkins, and NGO leader from Rajasthan, India and CUE Nonresident Scholar Urvashi Sahni.

Emiliana Vegas will share CUE’s newest ed-tech playbook, an evidence-based tool to help ministries of education realize the potential of education technology, leading into a discussion with the playbook co-authors, Alejandro Ganimian and Frederick Hess,moderated by CBS journalist Jearlyn Steele.

Viewers can submit questions via email to events@brookings.edu or via Twitter at #TransformingEdu.

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Short-Circuiting Policy: Interest Groups and the Battle over Clean Energy and Climate Policy in the American States
Monday, September 14
12:00PM TO 1:00PM
Online
RSVP at https://www.belfercenter.org/program/environment-and-natural-resources#!energy-policy-seminar-series

Leah Stokes, UC Santa Barbara
Hosted each semester at HKS, the Energy Policy Seminar Series provides a public forum for students, faculty, and interested community members to deepen their knowledge of current issues surrounding energy systems and sustainability. The EPSS features a range of speakers, from academic experts to science journalists to climate activists.

Link:  https://www.belfercenter.org/event/energy-policy-seminar-leah-stokes-short-circuiting-policy-interest-groups-and-battle-over
Contact Name:  Amanda Sardonis
amanda_sardonis@hks.harvard.edu

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The 2020 U.S. Presidential Election: Politics, Economics, and Strategy
Monday, September 14
12 – 1 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://programs.wcfia.harvard.edu/us-japan/event/fukushima-9-14-20

SPEAKER(S) Glen S. Fukushima, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress; Former Deputy Assistant U.S. Trade Representative for Japan and China; Former President, American Chamber of Commerce in Japan
Moderator: Christina Davis
Director, Program on U.S.-Japan Relations; Professor of Government; and Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Professor, Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University
CONTACT INFO eduncan@wcfia.harvard.edu

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Overground Railroad: The Green Book and the Roots of Black Travel
Monday, September 14
1 – 2:30 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://harvard.zoom.us/j/96347494519#success

SPEAKER(S)  Candacy Taylor, Author, photographer and cultural documentarian
Deborah Willis , University Professor and Chair of the Department of Photography & Imaging at the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University
DETAILS  Part of the W. E. B. Du Bois Research Institute Alumni Fellows Virtual Reading Series, featuring discussions of recent books by former Hutchins Center Fellows.
CONTACT INFO hutchevents@fas.harvard.edu

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The Boston Red Sox and WWII
Monday, September 14
5:30PM - 6:30PM
Online
RSVP at https://18308a.blackbaudhosting.com/18308a/The-Boston-Red-Sox-and-WWII

A conversation led by Gorden Edes, Historian of the Boston Red Sox

In this 75th anniversary of the end of World War II, join Boston Red Sox historian Gordon Edes and a panel of distinguished authors to discuss the role of Major League Baseball players from Boston in the conduct of that historic conflict. The story touches upon Ted Williams, a Naval flight instructor who would later fly combat missions for the Marines in the Korean War, but also tells of compelling acts of sacrifice and bravery performed by other big-leaguers from Boston, including Si Rosenthal and Earl Johnson of the Red Sox and Warren Spahn of the Braves.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Science and Cooking Public Lecture: The Science of Sugar
Monday, September 14
7 – 8 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ykO-tKVsRIWLFW2rcXC4aQ

SPEAKER(S)  Joanne Chang ’91 (@jbchang), Flour Bakery and Café, Myers + Chang, author of “Flour,” “Flour Too,” “Myers + Chang at Home,” and “Baking With Less Sugar”
DETAILS  The lectures pair Harvard professors with celebrated food experts and renowned chefs to showcase the science behind different culinary techniques. The series is based on the Harvard course “Science and Cooking: From Haute Cuisine to the Science of Soft Matter,” but public lectures do not replicate course content.
Each presentation will begin with a 15-minute lecture about the scientific topics from that week’s class by a faculty member from the Harvard course. This week's topic is "The Science of Sugar"
CONTACT INFO science_cooking@seas.harvard.edu

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Connecting the Dots: Capitalism, Climate Catastrophe and the Carceral State
Monday, September 14
7:00 PM – 8:30 PM EDT
Online
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/connecting-the-dots-capitalism-climate-catastrophe-and-the-carceral-state-tickets-119712235519

A Collaboration of Fossil Fuel Divest Harvard (FFDH) and Harvard Prison Divestment Campaign (HPDC)

The first-ever publicly convened conversation with alumni organizers from Fossil Fuel Divest Harvard (FFDH) and the Harvard Prison Divestment Campaign (HPDC) is happening on Monday, September 14 at 7pm Eastern. You don't want to miss it.

No doubt you've sensed the interwovenness of the issues you care about most deeply (maybe that's why you voted for Harvard Forward; and maybe that's why you feel so restless now, perceiving injustice on too many fronts). We have too.

In this historic conversation, FFDH and HPDC alumni come together for the first time to finally address what connects our concerns, and to hold Harvard to account. 

We'll expose the role of the university's $40 billion endowment in perpetuating climate crisis and mass incarceration. We'll look unflinchingly at the extractive capitalist imperatives driving these injustices. And we'll make a plan to demand better. Together.

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Tuesday, September 15
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HOW RACISM ERODES MIND, BODY AND SPIRIT, AND HOW TO HEAL AND LEARN
Tuesday, September 15
6am
Online
RSVP at https://www.commonwealthclub.org/events/2020-09-15/how-racism-erodes-mind-body-and-spirit-and-how-heal-and-learn

Mary-Frances Winters will discuss the ideas in her new book, Black Fatigue, How Racism Erodes Mind, Body and Spirit, which will be published by BK Publishing this fall. The book describes a phenomenon Black people know well: the multifaceted physical and psychological damage wrought by simply living, day by day in a racist society.

This is a vital resource for Black and non-Black people  looking for ways to heal, learn and have productive and supportive conversations about racial injustice and trauma.

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Stories of Change: Transforming travel and energy
Tuesday, September 15
8am – 9:30am EDT
Online
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/stories-of-change-transforming-travel-and-energy-tickets-113470571534

Lessons from innovative and imaginative low carbon transformation

This free online workshop will explore how successful low-carbon initiatives can lead to permanent change and meaningful action on climate breakdown on a larger scale. We are especially interested in actions that had a ripple effect – that led to changes beyond what was initially planned or expected.

Suitable for anyone working within their community, organisation, local authority or their own daily lives to respond to the climate emergency, Stories of Change will share and celebrate the insights of people and groups who have managed to share, scale up, or amplify the impact of their activities. Join us to discover and discuss inspiring good practice and come away with fresh and practical ideas of how to bring about change.

This workshop explores stories linked to travel, transport, energy, and more. 

These events form part of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research's 20th anniversary celebrations.

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COMPROMISED: PETER STRZOK AND THE INVESTIGATION OF DONALD TRUMP
Tuesday, September 15
9:30am
Online
RSVP at https://www.commonwealthclub.org/events/2020-09-15/compromised-peter-strzok-and-investigation-donald-trump

On August 10, 2018, veteran FBI agent Peter Strzok was fired after personal text messages from 2016 disparaging then-candidate Donald Trump were released. President Trump celebrated, writing on Twitter “Fired FBI Agent Peter Strzok is a fraud, as is the rigged investigation he started. There was no Collusion or Obstruction with Russia, and everybody, including the Democrats, know it.”

But Strzok’s story is anything but straightforward. He led the FBI’s investigation into both Hillary Clinton’s private email server and Russia’s interference in the 2016 election, drawing the ire of conservative allies of the president. When his text messages were released, they provided ammunition for the conspiracy theory of a “deep state” out to undermine Trump’s presidency.

Join Strzok as he tells his side of one of the 21st century’s most explosive stories. He’ll draw on lessons from a long career in law enforcement and explain why he’s convinced that the commander in chief has fallen under the sway of America’s adversary in the Kremlin.

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Outlook for global energy and climate trends post-Covid-19
Tuesday, September 15
10:00am to 11:00am
Online
RSVP at https://mit.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_vyjQsxFURDqNs7RLjyCW7w

IEA Executive Director Fatih Birol will discuss how the Covid-19 pandemic and current global economic turmoil are affecting global energy markets and their prospects in the years to come. His remarks will cover what can be done to accelerate the development of better, less expensive technologies to reduce carbon emissions and mitigate climate change. He will also outline the policy actions that will be necessary to deal with the evolving and multidimensional nature of energy security as global energy transitions continue to build momentum.

About the speaker
Fatih Birol has served as executive director of the International Energy Agency (IEA) since September 2015. Under his leadership, the IEA has undertaken its first comprehensive modernization program since its creation in 1974. This effort focuses on three pillars: opening the doors of the IEA to include major emerging countries, such as Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, and South Africa, thus increasing the IEA’s share of global energy demand from 38% to almost 75%; broadening the IEA’s security mandate to natural gas and electricity as well as oil; and making the IEA the global hub for clean energy technologies and energy efficiency.

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Yamiche Alcindor
Tuesday, September 15
11am EDT
Online
RSVP at https://umassboston.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIvce-pqj4iH9x6NWqavDzWMPA999Nx9hl-

Yamiche Alcindor is an American journalist who is the White House correspondent for the PBS NewsHour and a political contributor to NBC News and MSNBC. In the past, she has worked as a reporter for USA Today and The New York Times. Alcindor writes mainly about politics and social issues.

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Reporting environmental challenges and stories of indigenous communities
Tuesday, September 15
12:00 PM – 1:30 PM EDT
Online
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.co/e/reporting-environmental-challenges-and-stories-of-indigenous-communities-registration-118703249615

This bilingual webinar is organized by Fundación Gabo, Grupo ISA, and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.

Reporting environmental challenges through the stories of indigenous communities 
Indigenous communities are facing an unprecedented combination of threats including environmental change and threats to cultural heritage, often driven by outside actors. Especially now, in the midst of a global pandemic, one may wonder what the future holds for those on the frontline. This webinar will examine the work of journalists who cover these issues and work to shed light on the evolution of Indigenous stories and the adaptation of their communities.

Panelists:
Nelly Luna ( Peru), co-founder and editor for OjoPúblico; Tom Laffay (Colombia/USA), filmmaker and visual journalist, and Amado Villafañe (Colombia) visual journalist, in conversation with journalist Nathalie Iriarte (Bolivia).


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Beyond Rights: Intersectional Disabled Movements & Disability Justice for Our Future
Tuesday, September 15
12 – 1 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_79Ry9hO0TV2szvYqGV6IOQ

SPEAKER(S)  Lydia X. Z. Brown, Director of Policy, Advocacy, & External Affairs; Autistic Women & Nonbinary Network

CONTACT INFO jbowler@law.harvard.edu
LINK  https://hpod.law.harvard.edu/events/event/beyond-rights-intersectional-disabled-movements-disability-justice-for-our-future

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JOVRNALISM: Hijacking a Dancing Hot Dog for the Future of Journalism
Tuesday, September 15
12:00pm to 1:30pm
Online
RSVP at http://opendoclab.mit.edu/9-15-20-robert-hernandez/

In conversation (online) with: Robert Hernandez
JOVRNALISM is a production course created and led by Professor Robert Hernandez, where they use emerging tech to tell award-winning, innovative non-fiction stories. Their goal is to inspire the journalism industry to embrace the next disruption by leading the next disruption, whether that is through 360 video, augmented reality, virtual reality, drones, and more. Often taking technology that is intended for other purposes, this small class of students hijacks platforms like Snapchat to tell stories about homelessness, youth in foster care and more. This will be an engaging, hands-on session so make sure your phone is charged (and connected to WiFi).

Robert Hernandez, aka WebJournalist, has made a name for himself as a journalist of the Web, not just on the Web. His primary focus is exploring and developing the intersection of technology and journalism – to empower people, inform reporting and storytelling, engage community, improve distribution and, whenever possible, enhance revenue. He is a Professor of Professional Practice at USC Annenberg, but he’s not an academic – he’s more of a “hackademic” that specializes in “MacGyvering” digital journalism through emerging technologies. His most recent work includes Augmented Reality, Wearables/Google Glass and Virtual Reality. He and his students produce VR experiences under their brand: JOVRNALISM™. Their work has won awards from The Webby Awards, The Shorty Awards, the Online News Association, Society of Professional Journalists, among others, and can be seen in Al Jazeera, The New York Times, NBC, NPR, ProPublica, USA Today and in their own iOS/Android app. He has worked for seattletimes.comSFGate.comeXaminer.com,  and La Prensa Gráfica, among others. Hernandez is also the co-founder of #wjchat and co-creator of the Diversify Journalism Project. He has served on boards that have included Chicas Poderosas, InquireFirst, the Online News Association and the National Association of Hispanic Journalists (where he is a lifetime member). He is also a Journalism 360 ambassador and program lead. He is the recipient of SPJ’s 2015 Distinguished Teaching in Journalism Award and the 2018 NAHJ Si Se Puede Award. He has made it to imgur’s front page more than once. He connects dots and people.

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Could Climate Change Increase the Risk of Mold in Housing?
Tuesday, September 15
12:15-1:15 pm
Online
RSVP at https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_1DZqWrZmRGOZ0zx7Lwng-g
Reservation required

Holly Samuelson, Pamela Cabrera Pardo, Sara Tepfer
Predicted changes in weather could make wood-framed residential buildings more susceptible to mold. In this presentation, Holly Samuelson, an assistant professor of architecture at the Graduate School of Design (GSD); Pamela Cabrera, a GSD graduate now working as a climate engineer and associate at Transsolar KlimaEngineering; and Sara Tepfer, a doctor of design student at GSD; will discuss research, funded in part by our Center, that combines state-of-the-art hygrothermal simulations and mold-growth computations with data on predicted weather changes in several cool-climate US cities. Their results indicate significantly increased risk of mold in many structures that were built in compliance with applicable building codes. These findings suggest that current building codes and construction practices are based on overly narrow projected climate conditions that may be ill-suited for future climate conditions.

The Harvard Joint Center for Housing Studies advances understanding of housing issues and informs policy. Through its research, education, and public outreach programs, the Center helps leaders in government, business, and the civic sectors make decisions that effectively address the needs of cities and communities. Through graduate and executive courses, as well as fellowships and internship opportunities, the Center also trains and inspires the next generation of housing leaders.

Contact Name:  jchs@harvard.edu

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MIT Press Live! Entanglements Author Talk
Tuesday, September 15
12:30pm to 1:30pm
Online
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/entanglements-by-sheila-williams-annalee-newitz-cadwell-turnbull-tickets-118204379481

MIT Press Live! Presents an author talk with Sheila Williams, Annalee Newitz & Cadwell Turnbull

In a future world dominated by the technological, people will still be entangled in relationships—in romances, friendships, and families. This volume in the Twelve Tomorrows series considers the effects that scientific and technological discoveries will have on the emotional bonds that hold us together.

About the Editor
Sheila Williams is the multiple Hugo-award winning editor of Asimov's Science Fiction magazine and the editor or coeditor of more than two dozen anthologies.
About the Book
https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/twelve-entanglements

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Quantifying Social & Environmental Impact for Investors, with Catherine Griffin
Tuesday, September 15
1:00 PM to 2:00 PM EDT
Online
RSVP at https://fi.co/startupwebinar/1784
To join after the event begins, go to http://onlinestartupevents.com.

As consumers become more conscious of company practices, building a venture that truly has a positive social or environmental impact in the world is becoming increasingly important to buyers and employees alike. To demonstrate progress in these areas, founders need to consider what metrics to measure. In this webinar, learn how to quantify social and environmental impact, and how to use impact data to engage with investors. Joining us to present on this topic is Catherine Griffin, Founder of Impact.able, Managing Director of GoodCompany Ventures, and Adjunct Professor at Temple University.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND?
Founders who want to positively impact the world
Founders who are building eco-friendly or social impact startups
Anyone who is thinking about raising money for their startup
Anyone that wants an understanding of fundraising for early-stage businesses and products
Anyone who wants to learn how to have an extra edge when pitching their startup

Learn more about the Founder Institute pre-seed startup accelerator at http://fi.co/ and see other online startup events at http://onlinestartupevents.com.

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Tech & Climate Change
Tuesday, September 15
1pm – 2:30pm EDT
Online
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/tech-climate-change-tickets-101789033740

The impact of the tech sector on climate

There's little doubt that the tech sector has a large — and growing — impact on the environment. Data centres can be energy hogs; one study forecasts that they'll account for 33% of global electricity consumption by 2025. Another claims that in the next 10 years they will produce close to five times the CO2 emissions of air travel. Electronic waste is another issue: the United Nations reports that 50 million tons of e-waste are produced each year. And some tech-driven companies enable wasteful practices, such as fast fashion and scores of idling vehicles.

But it isn't all bad news. A new data centre study has found that while energy consumption is increasing, it's begun to level off, while computing capacity grew six-fold from 2010 to 2018. And many of the largest providers of cloud services have made commitments to become carbon neutral: Microsoft, for example, has announced that by 2050 it will remove “all of the carbon” that it has emitted since it was founded in 1975. And in February the GSMA announced that 29 mobile operator groups representing 30% of global mobile connections have committed to new Science-Based Targets that include the reduction of emissions by at least 45% by 2030.

Tech companies are also developing new solutions to climate issues: improving efficiency through the use of AI; measuring and monitoring more effectively with IoT; and creating new energy storage and transmission techniques.
Will these activities have a genuine positive impact on the planet?  Or is much of this just green-washing?  

WiTT is assembling a panel of experts and practitioners who will address these and other questions and review of some of the latest activities in the sector that aim to reduce its impact on climate change. WiTT board member Yasmeen Majid, Head of Global Network Change at Aviva, will lead our panel. We are delighted to announce that she will be joined by:
Kimberly Wells, Associate, Bird & Bird; 
Janet Gunter, Outreach Lead, Co-founder, The Restart Project; and
Kate Rosenshine, Head of Azure Cloud Solution Architecture - Media, Telco & Professional Services at Microsoft.
Other speakers will be announced closer to the date.

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Imagining the Next Global Economy
Tuesday, September 15
2 – 3 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1F1pyyDvF-4&feature=youtu.be

SPEAKER(S)  Rawi Abdelal, Herbert F. Johnson Professor of International Business, Harvard Business School; Director, Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies, Harvard University
DETAILS  There is no going back to the beginning. The emerging global economy will not resemble the system that came before. That pre-pandemic system was already fragile. Now we have an opportunity to imagine a new global economy.
This is the first lecture in a series of lectures offered by the 2018-2021 US Department of Education Title VI/National Resource Centers for Russia, Eastern Europe and Central Asia.
LINK  https://daviscenter.fas.harvard.edu/events/imagining-next-global-economy
CONTACT INFO Kathryn W. and Shelby Cullom Davis Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies
Harvard University
1730 Cambridge Street, 3rd Floor • Cambridge, MA 02138
617.495.4037

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Perfecters of this Democracy:  Conversation with Nikole Hannah-Jones:  Radcliffe Institute 20th Anniversary Lecture
Tuesday, September 15
4:00 pm
Online
RSVP at https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2020-conversation-nikole-hannah-jones-virtual

Nikole Hannah-Jones, Pulitzer Prize–winning reporter and creator of the 1619 Project, will engage in conversation with Tomiko Brown-Nagin, dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University, about pressing issues of race, civil rights, injustice, desegregation, and resegregation.

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Election 2020: What Keeps You Up at Night?
Tuesday, September 15
4 – 5 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/3315996015929/WN_mnx0eU2nQ62NvR3o2WEpag

SPEAKER(S) Janai Nelson, Associate Director-Counsel, NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc.
Judd Choate, Director of Elections, Colorado Secretary of State’s Office
Karen Hobert Flynn, National President, Common Cause
Moderator: Miles Rapoport, Senior Practice Fellow in American Democracy, Ash Center
DETAILS  What are the greatest threats to a successful U.S. election in November? Join the Ash Center in discussion with three leading U.S. election practitioners - one litigator, one election official, and one national grassroots organizing leader — as we ask each of them a series of questions about their greatest fears around the voting process, their work to achieve a fully inclusive and well-administered election, and their ideas for the future of U.S. democracy. 
This event forms part of the “Justice, Democracy, and the 2020 Elections” series hosted by the democracy program at Harvard Kennedy School’s Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation. The series discusses major developments around the election as they unfold, focusing on the democratic process itself, through the lens of conversations with leading practitioners in the field.

Virtual Event Details
This event will be held via Zoom Webinar. Please register to receive the login as well as an event reminder before the event. Questions for the panelists can be submitted in advance of the discussion via the registration form.
Questions? Please contact the Ash Center event team at info@ash.harvard.edu.
LINK  https://ash.harvard.edu/event/election-2020-what-keeps-you-night

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Conversation on Whistleblowing, Authority, and Subversion
Tuesday, September 15
4:00 - 5:30 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://cssh.northeastern.edu/humanities/a-conversation-on-whistleblowing-authority-and-subversion/

The 2019-2020 "Authority and Subversion" Fellowship will discuss whistleblowing with the following invited speakers:

Allison Stanger, Professor of International Politics and Economics at Middlebury College
David Sanger, New York Times correspondent and author
Lida Maxwell, Associate Professor of Political Science and WGSS at Boston University

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Psilocybin and Mystical Experience: Implications for Healthy Psychological Functioning, Spirituality, and Religion
Tuesday, September 15
5 – 6 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_0LhjB3smQz2Qazj6prbd9g

DETAILS  This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Please register here.
Mystical-type experiences are profound and often characterized by an authoritative sense of the unity and sacredness and sometimes interpreted as an encounter with God or Ultimate Reality. Although such experiences have been described by mystics and religious figures throughout the ages, there are few experimental studies because such experiences usually occur at low rates and often unpredictably. Psilocybin in the form the Psilocybe genus of mushrooms has been used for centuries within some cultures for religious and healing purposes. This presentation will review a series of studies investigating the effects of psilocybin administered to carefully screened and psychologically prepared volunteers who were encouraged to close their eyes and direct their attention inwards. Under such conditions, psilocybin occasions profound personally and spiritually meaningful mystical-type experiences in the majority of participants.
Roland Griffiths is Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Neurosciences and Director of the Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His principal research focus is on the behavioral and subjective effects of mood-altering drugs.
CONTACT CSWR, 617.495.4476

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The Tyranny of Merit:  What's Become of the Common Good?
Tuesday, September 15
5:00 PM
Online 
RSVP at https://www.harvard.com/event/virtual_event_michael_j._sandel/
Cost:  $5 suggested - pay what you can - On Sale Now

Harvard Book Store's virtual event series welcomes world-renowned philosopher MICHAEL J. SANDEL—author of the internationally bestselling What Money Can’t Buy: The Moral Limits of Markets and Justice: What’s the Right Thing to Do?—for a discussion of his latest book, The Tyranny of Merit: What's Become of the Common Good?. He will be joined in conversation by PREET BHARARA, former U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York and author of Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law.
Ticketing

About The Tyranny of Merit
These are dangerous times for democracy. We live in an age of winners and losers, where the odds are stacked in favor of the already fortunate. Stalled social mobility and entrenched inequality give the lie to the American credo that "you can make it if you try." The consequence is a brew of anger and frustration that has fueled populist protest and extreme polarization, and led to deep distrust of both government and our fellow citizens—leaving us morally unprepared to face the profound challenges of our time.

World-renowned philosopher Michael J. Sandel argues that to overcome the crises that are upending our world, we must rethink the attitudes toward success and failure that have accompanied globalization and rising inequality. Sandel shows the hubris a meritocracy generates among the winners and the harsh judgement it imposes on those left behind, and traces the dire consequences across a wide swath of American life. He offers an alternative way of thinking about success—more attentive to the role of luck in human affairs, more conducive to an ethic of humility and solidarity, and more affirming of the dignity of work. The Tyranny of Merit points us toward a hopeful vision of a new politics of the common good.

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Memory, Social Justice, and Mindfulness
Tuesday, September 15
5:30 – 6:30 p.m.
Online 
RSVP at https://edportal.harvard.edu/event/memory-social-justice-and-mindfulness

DETAILS  This 4-week series from the Harvard Ed Portal builds off of Dr. Angel Acosta's 400 Years Project, which centers contemplative practice around the history of inequality in the US.
The goal of this workshop is to engage with, acknowledge, and awaken ourselves to the dynamics of racism and oppression at all levels. Each session will have a mix of practices, including:
Mindfulness and compassion practices
Walking through the 400 Years Timeline
Guided storytelling and reflection
By understanding how history lives in each of us and the systems which surround us, we can begin to heal the wounds of historical trauma, both individually and collectively.
Please note: As this is a cumulative workshop, attendance is strongly encouraged at all four sessions, to help build a safe space for discussion and trust.

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Designing for equity and engaging diverse communities
Tuesday, September 15
6 PM
Online
RSVP at https://buy.acmeticketing.com/orders/483/tickets?eventId=5f299477bc02c1568a9577b1&cdEventIds=5f299477bc02c1568a9577b1&date=2020-09-15T18:00:00-04:00

Hosted by The Trustees Boston Waterfront Initiative team (onewaterfront.org), this virtual panel discussion will examine real-world examples of practical, effective, and thoughtful community engagement during open space development and programming. This event is free for all, though advance registration is required (Zoom link provided upon registration). To register and to "meet" our panelists--renowned thought leaders in equity and social justice--visit: http://bit.ly/3a1htk0 

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Lowell Lecture with Kathrine Switzer: More Than Running: Changing the Course of Women’s History
Tuesday, September 15
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM
Online
RSVP at https://wgbh.zoom.us/webinar/register/8115972381470/WN_YBy00UEpRTCeA6nqRgbAhA

Join the Boston Public Library in partnership with the WGBH Forum Network for an online Lowell Lecture with Kathrine Switzer, author of Marathon Woman: Running the Race to Revolutionize Women's Sports. BPL President David Leonard will moderate this program, which is part of our "Arc of History: Contested Perspectives" series. This conversation is also part of the esteemed Lowell Lecture series at the Boston Public library. 

In her book, Switzer describes how she registered to compete, saying, “there was nothing about gender in the marathon. I filled in my AAU number, plunked down $3 cash as entry fee, signed as I always sign my name, 'K.V. Switzer,' and went to the university infirmary to get a fitness certificate.” During the marathon she was accosted by race officials who tried to take away her bib number. As a result of Switzer’s act, the Amateur Athletic Union (AAU) banned women from competing in races against men until 1972, when the Boston Marathon established an official women's race.

In 1967, Kathrine Switzer became the first woman to officially run the Boston Marathon as a numbered entrant. During her run, race official Jock Semple attempted to stop Switzer and grab her official bib; however, he was shoved to the ground by Switzer's boyfriend, Thomas Miller, who was running with her, and she completed the race. It was not until 1972 that women were allowed to run the Boston Marathon officially. Fifty years later, Kathrine Switzer successfully ran the Boston Marathon again at age 70. 

Switzer was originally going to join us during the week of the 2020 Boston Marathon to discuss these barrier-breaking moments on the racecourse and in life. The COVID-19 outbreak resulted in the cancellation of the Boston Marathon in April 2020. In its stead, the Boston Athletic Association is hosting a series of virtual events in the second week of September. Learn more at this link:  https://www.baa.org/124th-boston-marathon-be-held-virtually

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Money for Nothing:  The Scientists, Fraudsters, and Corrupt Politicians Who Reinvented Money, Panicked a Nation, and Made the World Rich
Tuesday, September 15
7:00 PM
Online
RSVP at https://www.harvard.com/event/virtual_event_thomas_levenson/

Harvard Book Store's virtual event series welcomes THOMAS LEVENSON—professor of science writing at MIT and author of The Hunt for Vulcan: How Albert Einstein Destroyed a Planet and Deciphered the Universe—for a discussion of his latest book, Money for Nothing: The Scientists, Fraudsters, and Corrupt Politicians Who Reinvented Money, Panicked a Nation, and Made the World Rich.
Contribute to Support Harvard Book Store

About Money for Nothing
Money for Nothing chronicles the moment when the needs of war, discoveries of natural philosophy, and ambitions of investors collided. It's about how the Scientific Revolution intertwined with finance to set England—and the world—off in an entirely new direction.

At the dawn of the eighteenth century, England was running out of money due to a prolonged war with France. Parliament tried raising additional funds by selling debt to its citizens, taking in money now with the promise of interest later. It was the first permanent national debt, but still they needed more. They turned to the stock market—a relatively new invention itself—where Isaac Newton's new mathematics of change over time, which he applied to the motions of the planets and the natural world, were fast being applied to the world of money. What kind of future returns could a person expect on an investment today? The Scientific Revolution could help. In the hub of London's stock market—Exchange Alley—the South Sea Company hatched a scheme to turn pieces of the national debt into shares of company stock, and over the spring of 1720 the plan worked brilliantly. Stock prices doubled, doubled again, and then doubled once more, getting everyone in London from tradespeople to the Prince of Wales involved in money mania that consumed the people, press, and pocketbooks of the empire.

Unlike science, though, with its tightly controlled experiments, the financial revolution was subject to trial and error on a grand scale, with dramatic, sometimes devastating, consequences for people's lives. With England at war and in need of funds and "stock-jobbers" looking for any opportunity to get in on the action, this new world of finance had the potential to save the nation—but only if it didn't bankrupt it first.

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Virtual: Carol Hay with Tiziana Dearing, Think Like a Feminist 
Tuesday, September 15
7:00pm
Online
RSVP at https://www.crowdcast.io/e/thinklikeafeminist

Porter Square Books is pleased to bring you a virtual talk with Carol Hay, author of the new book Think Like a Feminist, in conversation with Tiziana Dearing! Think Like a Feminist is an audacious and accessible guide to feminist philosophy—its origins, its key ideas, and its latest directions. This event takes place on Crowdcast, and is free and open to all.

Think Like a Feminist is an irreverent yet rigorous primer that unpacks over two hundred years of feminist thought. In a time when the word feminism triggers all sorts of responses, many of them conflicting and misinformed, Professor Carol Hay provides this balanced, clarifying, and inspiring examination of what it truly means to be a feminist today. She takes the reader from conceptual questions of sex, gender, intersectionality, and oppression to the practicalities of talking to children, navigating consent, and fighting for adequate space on public transit, without deviating from her clear, accessible, conversational tone. Think Like a Feminist is equally a feminist starter kit and an advanced refresher course, connecting longstanding controversies to today’s headlines.

Think Like a Feminist takes on many of the essential questions that feminism has risen up to answer: Is it nature or nurture that’s responsible for our gender roles and identities? How is sexism connected to racism, classism, homophobia, transphobia, and other forms of oppression? Who counts as a woman, and who gets to decide? Why have men gotten away with rape and other forms of sexual violence for so long? What responsibility do women themselves bear for maintaining sexism? What, if anything, can we do to make society respond to women’s needs and desires?

Ferocious, insightful, practical, and unapologetically opinionated, Think Like a Feminist is the perfect book for anyone who wants to understand the continuing effects of misogyny in society. By exploring the philosophy underlying the feminist movement, Carol Hay brings today’s feminism into focus, so we can deliberately shape the feminist future.

Carol Hay is an associate professor of philosophy at University of Massachusetts Lowell and author of the award-winning Kantianism, Liberalism, and Feminism: Resisting Oppression. She’s written for the New York Times, the Boston Globe, and Aeon magazine. She divides her time between Boston and San Francisco.

Tiziana Dearing is the host of Radio Boston on WBUR. She’s been a commentator and contributor to WBUR for more than a decade, and has contributed to a number of other regional and national news outlets. Prior to joining the Radio Boston team, Tiziana was a professor at Boston College in the School of Social Work, where she taught social innovation and leadership. A longtime anti-poverty advocate, Tiziana also ran Boston Rising, a startup antipoverty fund to end generational poverty in Boston, and was the first woman president of Catholic Charities for the Archdiocese of Boston. She’s won a number of awards in the city, including a Pinnacle Award from the Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce and Boston Business Journal’s 40 Under 40.

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Planetary Health with Sam Myers and Living on Earth
Tuesday, September 15
7:00PM
Online
RSVP at https://umassboston.zoom.us/webinar/register/3315980251528/WN_48-ue-x6SWO_ZIBA0MICxA
or https://www.facebook.com/events/299743434461081

Join Living on Earth in conversation with Sam Myers, HSPH, as he discusses "Planetary Health: Protecting Nature to Protect Ourselves."

Human health depends on the health of the planet. Earth’s natural systems—the air, the water, the biodiversity, the climate—are our life support systems. Yet climate change, biodiversity loss, scarcity of land and freshwater, pollution and other threats are degrading these systems. The emerging field of planetary health aims to understand how these changes threaten our health and how to protect ourselves and the rest of the biosphere.

Planetary Health: Protecting Nature to Protect Ourselves provides a readable introduction to this new paradigm. With an interdisciplinary approach, the book addresses a wide range of health impacts felt in the Anthropocene, including food and nutrition, infectious disease, non-communicable disease, dislocation and conflict, and mental health. It also presents strategies to combat environmental changes and its ill-effects, such as controlling toxic exposures, investing in clean energy, improving urban design, and more.

You can join the even via Facebook or register to get the Zoom link. 

Contact Name:  Jay Feinstein
jfeinstein@loe.org

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Survival of the Friendliest 
Tuesday, September 15 
7:00 – 8:30 pm
Online
RSVP at https://www.mos.org/survival-of-the-friendliest

with Dr. Brian Hare and Vanessa Woods
Join us for a virtual celebration of the new book Survival of the Friendliest: Understanding Our Origins and Rediscovering Our Common Humanity by Dr. Brian Hare and Vanessa Woods. In this new study, from the trailblazing scientists and bestselling authors behind The Genius of Dogs, a powerful new theory about the secret to our success as a species is introduced and explored: self-domestication.

For over a century in popular culture, “survival of the fittest” has been interpreted to mean that some human lives are more valuable than others. This misunderstanding of the central pillar of biology has been used to justify eugenics and colonialism, and today continues to shape authoritarian agendas, anti-immigration sentiment, and the slow response to COVID-19. In their revolutionary new book, Dr. Hare and Woods bring forth the theory of “survival of the friendliest” at a time the world needs it most, providing actionable solutions based on the knowledge that to survive and flourish, we must expand our definition of who belongs.

Don’t miss this special live digital conversation between Dr. Brian Hare and Vanessa Woods, only with the Museum of Science!

After the conversation, stick around for a virtual book signing with the authors! If you would like an autographed copy of Survival of the Friendliest, you can purchase one directly at vanessawoods.net or brianhare.net in advance. During the online ordering process, you can submit any autograph requests (such as the name the inscription should be made out to) and let them know if you would like to see your book signed LIVE during the event.

“How can a top predator like the wolf have evolved to become ‘man’s best friend’? Finally a book that explains in the clearest of terms how friendliness and cooperation shaped dogs and humans. This book left me with a happy and optimistic view of nature.” — Isabella Rossellini, actress and activist

Please consider making a gift to support #MOSatHome and our SubSpace virtual fall season at donate.mos.org/mosathome and become a vital partner in helping us provide access to free STEM experiences online.

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CHINA’S RISE, THE DECLINE OF THE WEST, AND DEGLOBALIZATION
Tuesday, September 15
9:30pm - 10:30pm
Online
RSVP at https://bit.ly/2QR89Yz

Speaker(s): David Arase, Mark Beeson, Alejandro T Reyes
China is challenging the unipolar global order under American hegemony. Increasing nationalistic rhetoric about decoupling and deglobalization, and tit-for-tat trade and other sanctions have heated up the strategic rivalry. In this first AsiaGlobal Papers webinar, David Arase of the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and Mark Beeson of the University of Western Australia discuss the weakening of US hegemony and Washington’s withdrawal from multilateral engagement, the shift in international politics from a unipolar to a bipolar or multipolar framework, and the geopolitical and economic consequences these shifts will have for the US, China and the Indo-Pacific region.

DAVID ARASE
Resident Professor of International Politics, Hopkins-Nanjing Center, School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University
David Arase is resident professor of International Politics at the Hopkins-Nanjing Center of the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies.
MARK BEESON
Professor of International Politics, University of Western Australia
Mark Beeson is professor of international politics at the University of Western Australia.
ALEJANDRO T REYES
Director of Knowledge Dissemination, Asia Global Institute
Alejandro T Reyes is director of knowledge dissemination and a visiting associate professor at Asia Global Institute, where he manages the AsiaGlobal Online journal.

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Wednesday, September 16
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What has COVID-19 taught us? “Build Back Better” in the Era of Sustainable Development
Wednesday, September 16
9:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Online
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/what-has-covid-19-taught-us-build-back-better-in-the-era-of-sustainable-tickets-116146594591

The panel will discuss UNESCO’s sustainability report in the context of build-back better at the local level.

Panel organized by the Environmental and Sustainability Education Special Interest Group at the Comparative International Education Society Conference.

UNESCO recently released its Education for Sustainable Development for 2030 framework - ‘Education for Sustainable Development: Towards achieving the SDGs’ urges us to reflect on our past actions and re-focus on achieving the SDGs. The panel will take the main principles from the UNESCO report and will invite various stakeholders to reflect on their practices over the past COVID-19 period and discuss how their practices have changed over this course.

Key questions that will shape the discussion are- What have we learnt from COVID-19 and how does our learning transform into informed practices towards sustainable development? Given the ever-changing education policy due to COVID-19, the panel will focus on sustainability practices at schools and at homes that continue to be neglected. For example, food wastage, energy wastage, plastic pollution, air travel and carbon emissions. This panel will help to reflect on building back better keeping sustainability as a lens. Teachers could reflect on the curriculum in school, parents reflect on sustainability practices at home and with their children. Academics and scholars provide a critical perspective on UNESCO’s 2030 framework and suggest next steps. Practitioners narrate how this past experience has shaped-up their implementation on the ground. Policy makers reflect on the policy gaps.

The panel will highlight discussion points that will help to “Build Back Better” keeping sustainability in mind. It will provide a critical perspective as well as concrete steps forward to make this planet a more equitable place to inhabit. It will reflect on gaps and turn them into opportunities to reflect and take action on. The participants will leave the discussion with clear ideas and objectives on how they can recover from this pandemic with a concrete vision for a sustainable future.

Panelists-
William Gaudelli, Dean and Professor College of Education, Lehigh University. On- How can academia use the UNESCO sustainability report to address the research gaps that exists?
Christina Kwauk, Center for Universal Education, The Brookings Institution. On- Is sustainability a far fetched agenda as we build –back?
Alexander Leicht, Chief Section of Education for Sustainable Development, Division for Peace and Sustainable Development, Education Sector, UNESCO. On - What are some of the local applications from the UNESCO sustainability report? What are 5 main areas that need local action?

Moderators- Radhika Iyengar, Director of Education, Center for Sustainable Development, Earth Institute, Columbia University. Chair ESE SIG, CIES Carine Verschuere, Ph.D. Candidate International & Comparative Education, Teachers College, Program Chair ESE SIG, CIES

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Reset: Reclaiming the Internet for Civil Society
Wednesday, September 16
11 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://carrcenter.hks.harvard.edu/os_events/nojs/registration/1367883

SPEAKER(S)  Ron Deibert, Professor of Political Science, and Director of the Citizen Lab, Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy, University of Toronto
DETAILS  Towards Life 3.0: Ethics and Technology in the 21st Century is a talk series organized by the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy featuring prominent scholars, business and technology leaders, public interest technologists, and activists who address the ethical and rights implications of the impact of Artificial Intelligence on society and human life. The title of the series draws inspiration from the title of Max Tegmark’s book, Life 3.0: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence.
LINK  https://carrcenter.hks.harvard.edu/os_events/nojs/registration/1367883
CONTACT INFO Laryssa Da Silveira
laryssadasilveira@hks.harvard.edu
617-998-5488

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Understanding and Influencing Energy Transitions: The Role of Policy and Behavior
Wednesday, September 16
12:00pm — 1:00pm     
Online 
RSVP at https://environment.yale.edu/calendar/listing/92164

Ken Gillingham, Associate Professor, Yale School of Environment
This talk will explore insights on energy transitions drawn from energy economics, behavioral economics, and energy modeling. How do consumer decisions influence the adoption of new technologies? How can policies guide the transitions to improve welfare? What approaches can be effective for reaching underserved communities? Using evidence from field experiments, large data sets, and theory, we will delve into important influencers of consumer behavior in the current energy transition underway and the policy implications of such findings.

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Kelman Seminar Series: Do Morals Matter: Presidents and Foreign Policy from FDR to Trump
Wednesday, September 16
12 – 1 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_L89ia0P8RE-VsLDQWhIaLA

SPEAKER(S)  Joseph S. Nye, Jr.
DETAILS  In "Do Morals Matter?", Joseph S. Nye, Jr., one of the world’s leading scholars of international relations, provides a concise yet penetrating analysis of the role of ethics in US foreign policy during the post-1945 era. Working through each presidency from Truman to Trump, Nye scores their foreign policy on three ethical dimensions: their intentions, the means they used, and the consequences of their decisions. Alongside this, he evaluates their leadership qualities, elaborating on which approaches work and which ones do not.

Since we so often apply moral reasoning to foreign policy, Nye suggests how to do it better. Crucially, presidents must factor in both the political context and the availability of resources when deciding how to implement an ethical policy–especially in a future international system that presents not only great power competition from China and Russia, but transnational threats as borders become porous to everything from drugs, infectious diseases, terrorism, cyber criminals, and climate change.
Books may be purchased here: global.oup.com
LINK  https://www.pon.harvard.edu/events/kelman-seminar-do-morals-matter/
CONTACT INFO  dlong@law.harvard.edu

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The Bomb: Presidents, Generals, and the Secret History of Nuclear War
Wednesday, September 16
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Online
RSVP at https://ssp.mit.edu/events/2020/the-bomb-presidents-generals-and-the-secret-history-of-nuclear-war

SSP Wednesday seminar with speaker Fred Kaplan.
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and SSP alumni Fred Kaplan discusses his book, which takes us into the White House Situation Room, the Joint Chiefs of Staff’s “Tank,” and the vast chambers of Strategic Command in Omaha to reveal the untold stories—based on exclusive interviews and previously classified documents—of how American presidents and generals have thought about, threatened, broached, and, in some cases, barely avoided nuclear war, from the dawn of the atomic age until now.

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18th Annual Hull Wind 1 Turbine Tour
Wednesday, September 16
1:30 - 3:30 PM 
Hull Wind 1, 100 Main Street, Hull
Please contact Andrew Stern astern@hotmail.com 510.673.2440 for more info.

All welcome to come on by and see renewable energy in action! 
Stop by for a private tour of the wind turbines on the coast of Hull, Massachusetts.   https://hullwind.net/
Meet  State Representative Joan Meschino former Hull Light Board Member (and  Hull resident!) and Panos Tokadjain Operations Manager HMLP and network  with other students and industry leaders.

The town of Hull has  been a pioneer in developing wind energy with two wind turbines: Hull I  (660 kW - 2001) and Hull II (1.8 MW - 2006). Both turbines are operated by the municipally-owned electric light department.

1:30 - 2:30   Vinyard Wind, MIT Energy Club, BU Energy Club
2:30 - 3:30   Harvard HESEC, Northeastern U, YPE

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People, Power, and Profits Progressive Capitalism for an Age of Discontent
Wednesday, September 16
3:00pm to 4:30pm
Online
RSVP at https://cssh.northeastern.edu/economics/economic-policy-forum/

Joseph Stiglitz, University Professor at Columbia University, is the co-winner of the 2001 Nobel Memorial Prize, former chairman of the President’s Council of Economic Advisers, and former Chief Economist of the World Bank. Known for his pioneering work on asymmetric information, Stiglitz’s work focuses on income distribution, risk, corporate governance, public policy, macroeconomics and globalization.

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Boston New Technology CleanTech-GreenTech & Energy Startup Showcase #BNT116
Wednesday, September 16
4:00 PM – 5:30 PM EDT
Online
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-new-technology-cleantech-greentech-energy-startup-showcase-bnt116-registration-117695878541

Learn about 6 innovative & exciting CleanTech, GreenTech & Energy products from local founders, ask your questions & network with us!

Join members of BNT's 50k network to:
See 6 innovative and exciting local CleanTech, GreenTech & Energy demos, presented by startup founders
Network virtually with attendees from Boston, Austin and beyond
Ask the founders your questions

Please register with a valid email address and you will immediately receive an email with the link you need to join this webcast and our online group!

Please follow @BostonNewTech and support our presenters by posting on social media using our #BNT116 hashtag. We'll retweet you!

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Michele Goodwin in conversation with Caroline Light and Patricia Williams
Wednesday, September 16
5 – 6 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/michele-goodwin-in-conversation-with-caroline-light-and-patricia-williams-tickets-117049741929

SPEAKER(S)  Michele Goodwin, Chancellor's Professor of Law, the University of California, Irvine
Caroline Light, Senior Lecture on Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality, Harvard University
Patricia Williams, University Distinguished Professor of Law and Humanities, Northeastern University
DETAILS  How do structures of surveillance in the lives of women of color result in infringements on privacy, civil liberties and civil rights?
About the Series
In a moment where our collective health depends on technological innovation – including “contact tracing” through the collection and storage of cell phone data – visual, biometric, and other forms surveillance collect us as pinpoints of data. Composite Bodies takes up questions of technology, surveillance, embodiment, and power from an intersectional feminist perspective. Through critical engagements with law, philosophy, art, history, bioethics, criminology, and advocacy, this series will address how the machine measurement and tracking of bodies is reconceptualizing notions of privacy while complicating the boundaries of the body as an integrated whole, reproducing and reinforcing biases based on race, class, gender, and other historically disabling taxonomies.

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A People's Guide to Greater Boston
Wednesday, September 16
6:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Online
RSVP at https://bpl.bibliocommons.com/events/search/fq=types:(5a78b58777a0b42400865b61)/event/5f21ddde0fec712f0015575a
Please note:  Registered users will receive Zoom link on the day of the event

Join authors Joseph Nevins, Suren Moodliar, and Eleni Macrakis for a talk about their timely new book. 
Purchase a hard copy of A People's Guide to Greater Boston from our local, independent bookstore partner Trident Booksellers at https://www.tridentbookscafe.com/book/9780520294523
For free USPS media mail shipping use code:  BPLSHIP

A People's Guide to Greater Boston reveals the region’s richness and vibrancy in ways that are neglected by traditional area guidebooks and obscured by many tourist destinations. Affirming the hopes, interests, and struggles of individuals and groups on the receiving end of unjust forms of power, the book showcases the ground-level forces shaping the city. Uncovering stories and places central to people’s lives over centuries, this guide takes readers to sites of oppression, resistance, organizing, and transformation in Boston and outlying neighborhoods and municipalities—from Lawrence, Lowell, and Lynn to Concord and Plymouth. It highlights tales of the places and people involved in movements to abolish slavery; to end war and militarism; to achieve Native sovereignty, racial equity, gender justice, and sexual liberation; and to secure workers’ rights. In so doing, this one-of-a-kind guide points the way to a radically democratic Greater Boston, one that sparks social and environmental justice and inclusivity for all.

Joseph Nevins was born and raised in the Dorchester section of Boston and is Professor of Geography at Vassar College. His books include A Not-so-distant Horror: Mass Violence in East Timor; Dying to Live: A Story of U.S. Immigration in an Age of Global Apartheid; and Operation Gatekeeper and Beyond: The War on "Illegals" and the Remaking of the US-Mexico Boundary.

Suren Moodliar, a resident of Chelsea, Massachusetts, is both coordinator of encuentro5, a movement building space in Downtown Boston, and editor of the journal Socialism and Democracy. He coedited Noam Chomsky’s Internationalism or Extinction (2020). He completed an MA in Political Science and African Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Eleni Macrakis grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and now works in the field of affordable housing development in the Greater Boston area. She holds a Master in Urban Planning from Harvard University.

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Lessons from a Pandemic: Solutions for Addressing the Climate Change Crisis
Wednesday, September 16
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
Online
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/lessons-from-a-pandemic-solutions-for-addressing-the-climate-change-crisis-tickets-102705932208?aff=ebdssbonlinesearch

Trottier Symposium on Sustainable Engineering, Energy & Design Lessons from a Pandemic: Solutions for Addressing the Climate Change Crisis

The current COVID-19 pandemic has been referred to by some as the “time lapse of the climate crisis” and has highlighted the importance of heeding the warnings and recommendations of scientists and experts to make informed policy decisions in order to stave off the most dire consequences. Climate change affects the global population, but unlike the novel virus which is unfolding in “real time”, climate change is taking place in “deep time”, a multi-generational time frame.

Over the last couple of decades there has been rapid progress towards technological solutions, which can move our societies towards sustainable manufacturing, infrastructure and renewable energy, thus mitigating climate change. Yet to date, progress on implementing these have been slow. A rich body of evidence and understanding of how climate change is negatively impacting our environment and well-being has been developed. Yet actions on adaptation and mitigation to avert disastrous outcomes are sporadic and fragmented.

Given the framework of the current unprecedented situation, the 7th Annual Trottier Symposium on Sustainable Engineering, Energy and Design will focus on laying a road map to addressing the climate change crisis while keeping the following questions in mind:
What are the most promising, important, equitable and viable solutions to climate change? Which are most likely to face the biggest opposition from the public and/or special interest groups?

How can scientists and engineers communicate their work to the general public as well as policymakers to help accelerate the implementation of technological and operational solutions that mitigate the effects of climate change and support future sustainable development?

Are there lessons learned from the current COVID-19 pandemic and society’s response, which can be applied to accelerating action on the climate emergency?
How can today’s scientific and engineering community get a wider cross section of the public to trust science messengers and engage in meaningful climate action?

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Health and Community in Times of Crisis
Wednesday, September 16
7:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
Online
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/rosemarie-day-zach-norris-health-and-community-in-times-of-crisis-tickets-117781332135

Public health expert Rosemarie Day and the Ella Baker Center's Executive Director, Zach Norris, tackle the social implications of COVID-19.

Rosemarie Day and Zach Norris discuss both of their books, the pandemic's effect on communities of color and lower income communities, public health policy across a wider range of issues, and much more!

Rosemarie Day, author of Marching Toward Coverage: How Women Can Lead the Fight for Universal Healthcare, is the founder and CEO of Day Health Strategies, which helps to implement national health reform. She’s been working in healthcare and related fields for more than 25 years, including as the founding deputy director and chief operating officer of the Health Connector in Massachusetts, where she helped launch the award-winning organization that established the first state-run health insurance exchange in the state. She also served as the chief operating officer for the Massachusetts Medicaid program. Rosemarie lives in Somerville, MA; this is her first book. Connect with her @Rosemarie_Day1 or at rosemarieday.com.

Zach Norris, author of We Keep Us Safe: Building Secure, Just, and Inclusive Communities, is the executive director of the Ella Baker Center for Human Rights, which creates campaigns related to civic engagement, violence prevention, juvenile justice, and police brutality, with a goal of shifting economic resources away from prisons and punishment and towards economic opportunity. He is also the cofounder of Restore Oakland and Justice for Families, both of which focus on the power of community action. He graduated from Harvard and took his law degree from New York University. Connect with him at zachnorris.com and on Twitter (@ZachWNorris).

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Thursday, September 17
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Pandemic Response Catalyst Conversation Series: Vaccines and Therapies and the Need for Speed
Thursday, September 17
10:00am to 11:00am
Online
RSVP at http://www.cvent.com/events/vaccines-and-therapies-and-the-need-for-speed/event-summary-c220e058b43e4befaf08023725b8d082.aspx

The world is impatiently waiting for effective vaccines and therapies to control the Covid-19 pandemic. Yet current processes for bringing drugs to market require an arduous clinical trial process and regulatory and safety hurdles that can span decades. In Vaccines and Therapies and the Need for Speed, expert panelists will discuss ways to safely accelerate clinical trials and respond to the global investment in rapid development. Removing competitive barriers to encourage open science around antiviral and vaccine candidates, unifying data standards, and establishing new testing methods are strategies we’ll cover in this virtual live event.

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The Risk of Digital Discrimination: Exploring AI Bias
Thursday, September 17
11:00 AM in Eastern Time (US and Canada)
Online
RSVP at https://kenan-flagler.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN__4NdB0ojTBWChDI6-Yrlfg

AI applications are ubiquitous – and so is their potential to exhibit unintended bias. Algorithmic and automation biases and algorithm aversion all plague the human-AI partnership, eroding trust between people and machines that learn.

But can bias be eradicated from AI? 

AI systems learn to make decisions based on training data, which can include biased human decisions and reflect historical or social inequities, resulting in algorithmic bias. The situation is exacerbated when employees uncritically accept the decisions made by their artificial partners. Equally problematic is when workers categorically mistrust these decisions.
Join our panel of industry and academic leaders, who will share their technological, legal, organizational and social expertise to answer the questions raised by emerging artificial intelligence capabilities. 

Speakers
Dr. Fay Cobb Payton, Professor of Information Systems/Technology, North Carolina State University; Program Director, Division of Computer and Network Systems, National Science Foundation
Timnit Gebru, Research Scientist and Co-lead, Ethical Artificial Intelligence Team, Google; Co-founder, Black in AI
Brenda Leong, Senior Counsel and Director of Artificial Intelligence and Ethics, Future of Privacy Forum 
Professor Mohammad Jarrahi, Associate Professor, School of Information and Library Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chris Wicher, AI Research Fellow, Kenan Institute of Private Enterprise; former Director of AI Research, KPMG AI Center of Excellence; Vice President, Watson Engineering, IBM

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Harvard Circular Economy Information Session I 
Thursday, September 17
12PM EST
Online
RSVP at https://harvard.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEtce2rqj8pGdF0FpCdrHhwvhNzGmVq4Bcn

Interested in the circular economy and passionate about sustainability? Come join an interdisciplinary group of students across the Harvard Kennedy, Business, Engineering, and Design Schools in organizing a series of virtual conference sessions that rethinks how to make circularity both competitive and sustainable.

During this meeting, we will discuss the tentative concepts and agenda for this year’s Circular Economy Symposium, and discuss lead and co-lead roles under the various functions (operations, speakers & content, funding, marketing & promotions, article segments). We are excited to have you join us to begin to implement the roadmap in making this event a success, we hope you will be able to make it! Learn more about the event last year and sign up for our info session via the link below.

Link:  https://www.circularatharvard.org/
Contact Name:  Johanna Schiele
johannaschiele@hks.harvard.edu

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RPP Webinar: Malcolm Sparrow on Fundamentals of Regulatory Design
Thursday, September 17
12 – 1 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_p6JEmbdmSEG6931Rn1jz5g

SPEAKER(S)  Malcolm Sparrow, Professor of the Practice of Public Management at HKS
DETAILS  Please join M-RCBG for a Regulatory Policy Program seminar featuring Malcolm Sparrow, Professor of the Practice of Public Management on his new book, "Fundamentals of Regulatory Design." Registration is required.
LINK  https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_p6JEmbdmSEG6931Rn1jz5g
CONTACT INFO  mrcbg@hks.harvard.edu

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Eat Local MA Presents: A Virtual Facility Tour of City Fresh Foods!
Thursday, September 17
12pm – 1pm EDT
Online
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.sg/e/eat-local-ma-presents-a-virtual-facility-tour-of-city-fresh-foods-tickets-118452409345

Join Sustainabile Business Network [SBN] for a virtual tour of the City Fresh Foods facility in Boston as part of the Eat Local MA Campaign!

City Fresh Foods works to deliver fresh, wholesome meals to childcare centers, schools, and rehabilitation programs across Eastern Massachusetts. Additionally, they work to educate communities about the benefits of making healthier and more nutritional choices in their daily diets. They continue to push the food industry to facilitate healthy eating, environmental sustainability and community development. During the COVID-19 pandemic, City Fresh Foods has delivered thousands of nutritional meals to hard-hit neighborhoods in Boston.
Visit: https://cityfresh.com/

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COVID-19 and the Stakes for Democracy in South America
Thursday, September 17
12 – 1:30 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07eh8r2iv1962f9517&oseq=&c=&ch=

SPEAKER(S)  Moderator: Alicia Ely Yamin, Senior Fellow in Global Health and Rights, The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School
Introduction: Carmel Shachar, Executive Director, The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School
Lidia Casas, Professor and Director of Human Rights Center, Universidad Diego Portales, Chile
Octávio Ferraz,Associate Professor, King's College London
Roberto Gargarella, Conicet Senior Researcher and Professor Universidad de Buenos Aires Argentina
Isabel Cristina Jaramillo Sierra, Professor, Universidad de los Andes, Colombia
DETAILS  The COVID-19 pandemic is not just a health crisis, or even an economic crisis, but also a critical inflection point for democracy and the rule of law. The pandemic has presented a test for the legitimacy of democratic governance, and perhaps nowhere are the stakes higher than in Latin America, which as of August 5, as a region had the world’s highest death toll per population.

Even before the pandemic, the region as a whole faced staggering levels of social inequality and political polarization. Chile had been wracked by months of massive protests against neoliberal austerity, and is now preparing for a national referendum on a constitutional reform. In Colombia, the Supreme Court ordered the house arrest of former president Alvaro Uribe, unleashing calls for judicial and constitutional reform. Brazil’s conservative populist president, Jair Bolsonaro, repeatedly dismissed the seriousness of the virus, and often found himself at odds with the judiciary. In Argentina, a new administration, which was facing a social and economic crisis before COVID-19, has now proposed sweeping judicial reform that critics see as institutionalizing impunity.

A panel of leading constitutional and human rights scholars from these four South American nations will join us to analyze these developments and discuss their expectations for the post-pandemic future of their countries.
LINK  https://petrieflom.law.harvard.edu/events/details/covid-19-and-the-stakes-for-democracy-in-south-america
CONTACT INFO P: 617-496-4662
E: petrie-flom@law.harvard.edu

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Eating Our Way Out of Climate Change; In Discussion with Sarah Bridle
Thursday, September 17
1pm – 3pm EDT
Online
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/eating-our-way-out-of-climate-change-in-discussion-with-sarah-bridle-tickets-117592300737

Sarah Bridle joins us for our eighth in a series of interactive talks on the climate emergency, environmentalism and Green politics.

We are excited to have Sarah Bridle join us for our eighth in a series of interactive talks on the climate emergency, environmentalism and Green politics in light of the global pandemic. Sarah will be discussing with us how different foods contribute to climate change and what we can do about it.

The format will be an introductory talk by Sarah, followed by a Q&A. We will then finish off in breakout rooms to have more interactive discussions in smaller groups.

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The 2020 State of Demand-Side Energy Management in California Webinar
Thursday, September 17
2 p.m. ET, 11 a.m. PT
Online
RSVP at https://info.cpowerenergymanagement.com/WBN-CA_SOTM_2020_LP-Registration.html

The Golden State’s energy market was poised to have a wild ride in 2020 before the onset of COVID-19 and the ensuing lockdown.  As California now works its way through the pandemic’s maze, organizations are reexamining their energy management strategies in search of optimization for an increasingly uncertain future.

Join CPower on September 17, 2020, at 11  am PT, 2 pm ET for a one-hour webinar designed to give organizations like yours the demand-side energy management insights you need to make the most of 2020 and beyond in California. 

Topics to be covered include:
Policy and regulatory changes in California
An update of the state’s renewable pursuits
Opportunities to monetize storage and other energy assets
Maximizing returns on demand response in CAISO and CA utility programs
And more...

CPower’s California energy market experts Jennifer Chamberlin and Diane Wiggins will host this live webinar that will include a question and answer session.

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Reconstructing the Polity (1870) (Online Event)
Thursday, September 17
4 – 5:15 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2020-reconstructing-polity-1870-virtual

SPEAKER(S)  Amanda Cobb-Greetham , Professor of Native American studies and director of the Native Nations Center, University of Oklahoma
Brittney Cooper, Associate professor of women’s, gender, and sexuality studies, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, and cofounder, Crunk Feminist Collective
Beth Lew-Williams, Associate professor of history and Philip and Beulah Rollins Bicentennial Preceptor, Princeton University
Moderator: Manisha Sinha, James L. and Shirley A. Draper Chair in American History, University of Connecticut
DETAILS  The reconstruction of the American polity after the Civil War — in particular, the adoption of the 15th Amendment in 1870 — marked a key moment in the long history of the 19th Amendment, women’s political mobilization, and the contested boundaries of United States citizenship. This panel will use gender as a lens to understand the cross-cutting trends of enfranchisement and disenfranchisement that came together in the wake of the Civil War.
Registration is required for this Zoom webinar. Instructions can be found by visiting the event web page.
LINK  https://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2020-reconstructing-polity-1870-virtual
CONTACT INFO events@radcliffe.harvard.edu

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Diseases in the District of Maine 1772-1820: Epidemics Then and Now
Thursday, September 17
4 – 5:30 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://harvard.zoom.us/j/94358234620?pwd=M2pIOEh5ajc3dVczUXoyRThPdjdwUT09#success

Center for the History of Medicine, Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
SPEAKER(S)  Richard Kahn, M.D., M.A.C.P, Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine; Internist, Penobscot Bay Medical Center, Maine
DETAILS  Colloquium on the history of psychiatry and medicine.
Open to students of history and those valuing a historical perspective on their professions.
CONTACT INFO david_satin@hms.harvard.edu

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Political Hobbyism vs. Political Power
Thursday, September 17
6:30 PM – 7:30 PM
Online
RSVP at https://brooklinema.zoomgov.com/webinar/register/WN_gJPQpjAcTzWfglgLq1w1ew

More than ever, Americans are spending time thinking, talking, and reading about politics. And yet, we’re below historical averages in actual civic and political volunteerism. What’s going on? Today, most people who are interested in politics are “political hobbyists” – engaging in politics to satisfy their own intellectual interests and emotional needs. In this talk, based on his book, Politics is for Power, Tufts University professor Eitan Hersh will lead a discussion on why so many of us practice a shallow form of political hobbyism, and most importantly, what the alternative is. The alternative is told through inspiring stories of seven organizers, including three from the Boston area, who figured out how to get into the trenches and empower their values.

Registration is required.

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Feminisms Unbound: The Neoliberal University and Academic Feminism
Thursday, September 17
6:30pm to 8:30pm
Online
RSVP at https://mit.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_wabDzoixQ8GYAGGELcSz6w

This panel takes its inspiration from our insistent critique of the academic corporation in which we find ourselves working today. Increasingly, our new colleagues are temporary and underpaid hires, who are nevertheless often expected to give service beyond teaching. Our senior administrators, compensated at the same levels as the corporate structure, are hired as much for their fundraising abilities as for their academic inclinations or interests. Juggling multiple jobs, our students are enmeshed in an aggregation of precarity that is not only financial: their protests of the institution’s raced, gendered, sexed and classed inequities, for instance, are repurposed into website photographs designed to advertise the institution’s openness to critique. Particularly as women, as queer, as trans, and as first-generation, the discomfort with an institution that is hostile to them is transformed into a burden to reform the institution. Does our activism and theorizing alleviate or intensify these inequities? How is the genealogy of such processes, which we often hear ourselves take for granted as deeply unethical, connected to the humanist values we espouse and teach? Some senior administrative positions, such as Diversity Officers, for instance, are the result of our successful struggles to force the administration to be ethical. What if the neoliberal university is not, in fact, antithetical to our goals or practices as feminists and principled social actors in the institution? Finally, how might we think both critically and imaginatively about the temporal implications of the neoliberal university today and our place in it: the claim now made on all of our time; our conception of “free” time; our justification of time spent away from the institution’s demands; the disproportionate burden of time placed on some students, staff and faculty?

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Mill Town:  Reckoning with What Remains
Thursday, September 17
7:00 PM
Online
RSVP at https://www.harvard.com/event/virtual_event_kerri_arsenault/

Harvard Book Store's virtual event series welcomes writer and editor KERRI ARSENAULT for a discussion of her debut memoir, Mill Town: Reckoning with What Remains. She will be joined in conversation by novelist and essayist LACY CRAWFORD. Her acclaimed memoir, Notes on a Silencing, is available for purchase here.

About Mill Town
Kerri Arsenault grew up in the rural working class town of Mexico, Maine. For over 100 years the community orbited around a paper mill that employs most townspeople, including three generations of Arsenault’s own family. Years after she moved away, Arsenault realized the price she paid for her seemingly secure childhood. The mill, while providing livelihoods for nearly everyone, also contributed to the destruction of the environment and the decline of the town’s economic, physical, and emotional health in a slow-moving catastrophe, earning the area the nickname “Cancer Valley.”

Mill Town is a personal investigation, where Arsenault sifts through historical archives and scientific reports, talks to family and neighbors, and examines her own childhood to illuminate the rise and collapse of the working-class, the hazards of loving and leaving home, and the ambiguous nature of toxins and disease. Mill Town is a moral wake-up call that asks, Whose lives are we willing to sacrifice for our own survival?

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Queer Voices in the Climate Movement
Thursday, September 17
7 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://xrmass.org/action/queerclimate/

Join us for an online presentation and discussion about queer representation and action in the climate movement.

We'll be having a conversation about:
History of LGBT+ social movements: How has the queer community had to come together to effect change in the past?
Recent climate science: Where do we stand today? What it the reality of our current projections? How does this affect the queer community?
Climate action: What can we do about it? How do our personal choices and our activism make a difference? What is non-violent direct action (NVDA)?
Climate, Racial, and Social Justice: What is Climate Justice and how does it relate to racial and social justice? How can we support the intersectionalities of climate justice?
This event will be a queer-focused discussion on the climate crisis and climate activism, but is open to everyone. Please invite any queer or non-queer friends you think may be interested. :)

With Love and Rage

The History of Now Plagues and Pandemics Edition
Friday, September 18 - December 4
2:00pm to 3:00pm
Online
RSVP at https://mit.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_8nuN-O1zRZ27d3f5UjUcLQ

This class exposes students to the study of history for its own sake and also for a deeper understanding of the present and the future.  We explore current events in a historical perspective from the vantage point of a series of MIT and guest speakers discussing their research in the context of current national and global events.  For Fall 2020, the course will focus on the history of infectious disease.  We will look transnationally and across discipline at how plagues and pandemics have made an impact on human and non-human history.  The course will have a roundtable format, meeting for one-hour sessions each week with brief presentations by the invited speakers followed by Q&A with enrolled students.  The course will also be broadcast live as a webinar each week for the benefit of interested members of the larger MIT community and the public.  A list of short, optional readings related to each week’s sessions is available upon request. Please contact kalopes @mit.edu if you would like to register for the webinar.  

MIT Faculty Coordinators/Moderators:  Sana Aiyar (History), Dwai Bannerjee (STS), Kate Brown (STS), Malick Ghachem (History), and Elizabeth Wood (History)

Fall 2020 Schedule of Meetings          
September 18: Race and Pandemics
Adia Benton, Northwestern University
Kathryn Olivarius, Stanford University

October 2: Cities and the Plague
Cindy Ermus, University of Texas at San Antonio
Martin Melosi, University of Houston

October 9: Immigration and Contagion 
Nayan Shah, University of Southern California
Natalia Molina, University of California at San Diego

October 23: Demography and Biopower
Anne McCants, MIT
John Brown, Clark University

October 30: Public Health, Biopower, and Inequality
Carlo Caduff, King’s College London
Amy Moran-Thomas, MIT

November 13: Plants and Plagues
Jean Beagle Ristaino, North Carolina State University 
John McNeill, Georgetown University
Tristan Brown, MIT

November 20: Sovereignties, Plagues, and Policing
Mary Augusta Brazelton, University of Cambridge
Laura Spinney, independent writer and science journalist

December 4: Premodern Pandemics
Michael McCormick, Harvard University
Nükhet Varlik, University of South Carolina

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Friday, September 18
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Difference Without Domination:  Pursuing Justice in Diverse Democracies
Friday, September 18
12:00 PM
Online
RSVP at https://www.harvard.com/event/virtual_event_danielle_allen/

Harvard Book Store's virtual event series and the Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics welcomes DANIELLE ALLEN—James Bryant Conant University Professor at Harvard University and the Safra Center's director—for a discussion of her co-edited book, Difference Without Domination: Pursuing Justice in Diverse Democracies. She will be joined in conversation by her fellow editor ROHINI SOMANATHAN, Professor of Economics at the Delhi School of Economics.

About Difference without Domination
Around the globe, democracy appears broken. With political and socioeconomic inequality on the rise, we are faced with the urgent question of how to better distribute power, opportunity, and wealth in diverse modern societies. This volume confronts the dilemma head-on, exploring new ways to combat current social hierarchies of domination.

Using examples from the United States, India, Germany, and Cameroon, the contributors offer paradigm-changing approaches to the concepts of justice, identity, and social groups while also taking a fresh look at the idea that the demographic make-up of institutions should mirror the make-up of a populace as a whole. After laying out the conceptual framework, the volume turns to a number of provocative topics, among them the pernicious tenacity of implicit bias, the logical contradictions inherent to the idea of universal human dignity, and the paradoxes and problems surrounding affirmative action. A stimulating blend of empirical and interpretive analyses, Difference without Domination urges us to reconsider the idea of representation and to challenge what it means to measure equality and inequality.

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Social Justice Leaders Series led by Dr. Keisha N. Blain
Friday, September 18
1 – 2 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://carrcenter.hks.harvard.edu/os_events/nojs/registration/1367645

SPEAKER(S)  Laura Mae Lindo, Member of Provincial Parliament for Kitchener Centre
Moderator: Keisha N. Blain, Associate Professor of History, University of Pittsburgh; Fellow, Carr Center
DETAILS  This webinar series, curated by Carr Center Fellow Keisha N. Blain, will feature social justice leaders working at the local, national, and international level. The series will highlight the work of leaders of color who are actively challenging racism and advancing human rights.
LINK  https://carrcenter.hks.harvard.edu/os_events/nojs/registration/1367645
CONTACT INFO Laryssa Da Silveira
laryssadasilveira@hks.harvard.edu
617-998-5488

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Jill Lepore in conversation with Fran Berman
Friday, September 18
1 – 2:30 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_N0XKwY3cRF2le9KLDAOAyQ

SPEAKER(S)  Jill Lepore
Fran Berman
DETAILS  Please join the HDSI for a discussion between Professors Jill Lepore and Fran Berman about Jill's new book If Then: How the Simulmatics Corporation Invented the Future.
LINK  https://datascience.harvard.edu/event/hdsi-book-talk-jill-lepore
CONTACT INFO datascience@harvard.edu

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Pioneers in Public Interest: The Battle for Voting Rights in 2020
Friday, September 18
1:00pm to 5:15pm
Online
RSVP at https://www.northeastern.edu/law/news/events/2020/voting-rights/

Join us in kicking off a new annual conference series celebrating the Public Interest Law Scholars Program  Each year, we will focus on scholarship related to a pressing public interest issue.

This virtual half-day conference will cover:
Voting purges
Threats to polling locations
Voter intimidation
Gerrymandering (and mathematical attention on issues of electoral redistricting)
Russian influence (fake news/misleading voters)
Machine malfunctions/snafus
Voter suppression (including obstacles to registration, cutbacks on early voting, stricter voter identification requirements).
Same day and online voter registration
Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the Supreme Court’s 2013 related ruling in Shelby Counter v. Holder

Keynote Speaker
Dale Ho, Director, Voting Rights Project, ACLU

Panelists include: 
Moon Duchin, Tisch College Senior Fellow, Tufts University
Associate Justice Anita Earls, Supreme Court of North Carolina
Rahsaan Hall ’98, Director, Racial Justice Program, American Civil Liberties Union of Massachusetts
Michael Li, Senior Counsel, Democracy, Brennan Center
Moderator: 
Alan Solomont, Pierre and Pamela Omidyar Dean of the Jonathan M. Tisch College of Civic Life, Tufts University

This annual event will celebrate the Public Interest Law Scholars Program and each year will focus on scholarship related to a pressing public interest issue.

In partnership with: 
The Center for Public Interest Advocacy and Collaboration and NuLawLab

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The Butterfly Effect:  Insects and the Making of the Modern World 
Friday, September 18
7:00 PM
Online
RSVP at https://www.harvard.com/event/virtual_event_edward_d._melillo/
Free - $3 contribution suggested at registration

Harvard Book Store's virtual event series, the Harvard University Division of Science, and the Harvard Science Library welcome EDWARD D. MELILLO—professor of history and environmental studies at Amherst College and author of Strangers on Familiar Soil: Rediscovering the Chile-California Connection—for a discussion of his latest book, The Butterfly Effect: Insects and the Making of the Modern World. He will be joined in conversation by science writer CHARLES C. MANN, author of The Wizard and the Prophet: Two Groundbreaking Scientists and Their Conflicting Visions of the Future of Our Planet.

About The Butterfly Effect
Insects might make us shudder in disgust, but they are also responsible for many of the things we take for granted in our daily lives. When we bite into a shiny apple, listen to the resonant notes of a violin, get dressed, receive a dental implant, or get a manicure, we are the beneficiaries of a vast army of insects. Try as we might to replicate their raw material (silk, shellac, and cochineal, for instance), our artificial substitutes have proven subpar at best, and at worst toxic, ensuring our interdependence with the insect world for the foreseeable future.
Drawing on research in laboratory science, agriculture, fashion, and international cuisine, Edward D. Melillo weaves a vibrant world history that illustrates the inextricable and fascinating bonds between humans and insects. Across time, we have not only coexisted with these creatures but have relied on them for, among other things, the key discoveries of modern medical science and the future of the world's food supply. Without insects, entire sectors of global industry would grind to a halt and essential features of modern life would disappear. Here is a beguiling appreciation of the ways in which these creatures have altered—and continue to shape—the very framework of our existence.

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Harvard Circular Economy Information Session II 
Friday, September 18
8PM EST
Online
RSVP at https://tinyurl.com/y5hf5onn

Interested in the circular economy and passionate about sustainability? Come join an interdisciplinary group of students across the Harvard Kennedy, Business, Engineering, and Design Schools in organizing a series of virtual conference sessions that rethinks how to make circularity both competitive and sustainable.

During this meeting, we will discuss the tentative concepts and agenda for this year’s Circular Economy Symposium, and discuss lead and co-lead roles under the various functions (operations, speakers & content, funding, marketing & promotions, article segments). We are excited to have you join us to begin to implement the roadmap in making this event a success, we hope you will be able to make it! Learn more about the event last year and sign up for our info sessions via the links below.

Link:  https://www.circularatharvard.org/
Contact Name:  Johanna Schiele
johannaschiele@hks.harvard.edu

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Saturday, September 19
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Ig Informal Lectures
Saturday, September 19
1 PM – 3 PM
Online at http://www.improbable.com

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James Edward Mills joins Nature Linc for our End of Summer Celebration
Saturday, September 19
6:30 PM – 7:30 PM EDT
Online
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/james-edward-mills-joins-nature-linc-for-our-end-of-summer-celebration-tickets-114650942054
Cost:  $0 -$30

Join Nature Linc and James Edward Mills, author of "The Adventure Gap: The Changing Face of the Outdoors" for a presentation & celebration

Farrington Nature Linc is honored to have James Edward Mills join us for a special presentation entitled "Over The Adventure Gap ~ the Path of Progress Toward Lasting Social Change." This event will include a celebration of our staff and students, as well an online auction to support our ongoing work.

James Edward Mills is a freelance journalist who specializes in telling stories about outdoor recreation and environmental conservation. He has worked in the outdoor industry since 1989 as a guide, outfitter, independent sales representative, writer, and photographer. He is the author of the book “The Adventure Gap: Changing the Face of the Outdoors” and the co-writer/co-producer of the documentary film An American Ascent. In 2020 The Adventure Gap was named by Outside Magazine as one of the 10 “Outdoor Books that Shaped the Last Decade”.
His story and experiences align deeply with Farrington Nature Linc's mission to connect youth - primarily youth of color - with the outdoors in a time when, even pre- COVID 19, being black or brown in nature is not always safe or easy.
While we have always believed that nature is necessary to health and well-being, Covid-19 has made the disparity in access to green spaces more clear than ever. These past six months have further driven our commitment to providing the communities we serve with the opportunity to explore and connect with the outdoors.

Farrington's programs have connected children and families with nature, on our property in Lincoln, and in green spaces near their homes and schools for more than 20 years.

We rely on the support of our donor community run run amazing outdoor programs for youth in the Greater Boston area. Please consider adding a donation to Farrington in your ticket order to support our ongoing programming and important work.

James is a contributor to several outdoor-focused print and online publications his most recent article was published in National Geographic Magazine, “Here’s How National Parks are working to fight racism.” Currently as a faculty assistant at the University of Wisconsin Nelson Institute For Environmental Studies James teaches a summer course for undergraduate students on diversity, equity and inclusion in outdoor recreation and public land management called Outdoors For All

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Monday, September 21 - Tuesday, September 29
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SENSE.nano Symposium: The Body at All Scales
Monday, September 21 - Tuesday, September 29
1pm - 5pm
Online
RSVP at https://mit.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ohdUponeTimMKEwKVdmd3A

From the level of cells, organs, and body systems to individuals and populations, this symposium, broken into three half-day webinars, will highlight the needs for new SENSE technologies, showcase research and innovations, and present the impact of these technologies. Over a series of invited technical talks, presentations by MIT-launched startups, student videos, and panel discussions, we will provide needs context and solution perspectives in the domains of sensing for the study of biology and for the care of humans in their natural environment.

Day 1—Sensing at the level of sub-cell, cell, and organs: September 21, 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM EDT
Day 2—Sensing at the level of body systems and populations: September 22, 1:00 PM – 5:00 PM EDT
Day 3—Start-up exchange (STEX) and future impacts: September 29, 1:00 PM – 4:00 PM EDT

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Monday, September 21
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Transitioning to a Low Carbon and Resilient Energy System of the Future: Key Challenges and Opportunities
Monday, September 21
12pm
Online
RSVP at https://www.belfercenter.org/program/environment-and-natural-resources#!energy-policy-seminar-series

Peter Green, NREL
Hosted each semester at HKS, the Energy Policy Seminar Series provides a public forum for students, faculty, and interested community members to deepen their knowledge of current issues surrounding energy systems and sustainability. The EPSS features a range of speakers, from academic experts to science journalists to climate activists.

Contact Name:  Amanda Sardonis
amanda_sardonis@hks.harvard.edu

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Thinking Through Soil: Case Study from the Mezquital Valley
Monday, September 21
12:00 PM
Online
RSVP at https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_Xx25l9RATJ28DRNPFQd0LQ

The Harvard Graduate School of Design welcomes Seth Denizen, a researcher and design practitioner trained in landscape architecture and human geography, who will give a talk as part of the Kiley Fellow Lecture Series.

Almost 200,000 acres of land in the fertile Mezquital Valley are irrigated with the untreated sewage of Mexico City. Every drop of rain, urban runoff, industrial effluent, and sewage in Mexico City is sent to the Mezquital Valley through a 60 kilometer pipe. Soils in this valley have been continuously irrigated with urban wastewater since 1901, longer than any other soil in the world. The capacity of these soils to produce conditions in which agriculture can be practiced safely and produce healthy crops depends on a complex negotiation between soil chemistry, farming practices, public policy, land management, and the urban design of Mexico City. Without this wastewater, the Mezquital Valley would be a desert, as it falls into the UN’s  “drylands” climate category, where rates of evapotranspiration exceed precipitation. Currently, more than 40% of the Earth’s surface is classified as “drylands.” In the context of a warming planet, the world simply cannot afford for urban wastewater reuse to fail. Water is scarce, and food security is fragile. In this context, the question becomes: what would the city look like if it needed to produce a fertile agricultural soil from its waste? What would the farm look like if it better anticipated its material connection to the bodies of 20 million people and the effluent of urban life?

Seth Denizen is a researcher and design practitioner trained in landscape architecture and human geography. He has received design awards from the SOM Foundation, Urban Edge Awards, and Bauhaus Dessau Foundation (2013), while also publishing widely on art and design with the Asia Art Archive, LEAP International Art Magazine of Contemporary China, Volume, Fulcrum, among others. He is currently a member of the editorial board of Scapegoat Journal: Architecture/Landscape/Political Economy. Collaborations include scientific research on Hong Kong’s urban microbiome, as well as art exhibitions in the Blackwood Gallery (Toronto), The Kunsthal (Netherlands), and Para/Site Art Space (Hong Kong). After teaching Landscape Architecture at the University of Hong Kong and the University of Virginia, Seth recently completed a PhD in Geography at the University of California Berkeley. His doctoral research investigates the vertical geopolitics of urban soil in Mexico City, where he is working with geologists and soil scientists to characterize the material complexities and political forces that shape the distribution of geological risk in Mexico's urban periphery.

The event will also be live streamed to the GSD's YouTube page. Only viewers who are attending the lecture via Zoom will be able to submit questions for the Q+A. Live captioning will be provided during this event. After the event has ended, a transcript will be available upon request.

Contact Name:  events@gsd.harvard.edu

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Understanding the Role of Race in Health: A Moderated Discussion
Monday, September 21
12 – 1:30 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07eh9eny8i87a134c6&oseq=&c=&ch=

SPEAKER(S)  Introduction & Co-Moderator: I. Glenn Cohen 
James A. Attwood and Leslie Williams Professor of Law and Faculty Director of the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School
Co-Moderator: Craig Konnoth, Associate Professor of Law and Director, Health Law Certificate, University of Colorado Law School
Michele Goodwin, Chancellor’s Professor at the University of California, Irvine; Founding director of the Center for Biotechnology and Global Health Policy
Dayna Matthew, Dean and Harold H. Greene Professor of Law at George Washington University Law School
Kimani Paul-Emile, Professor of Law, Associate Director and Head of Domestic Programs and Initiatives at Fordham Law School’s Center on Race, Law & Justice, and Faculty Co-Director of the Fordham Law School Stein Center for Law & Ethics
Samuel Roberts, Associate Professor of History and of Sociomedical Sciences, Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University
DETAILS  Structural racism pervades all facets of society, from education, to housing, to law enforcement. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the health disparities that result from this systemic and structural racism.

The Petrie-Flom Center has asked leading scholars in law, public health, history, sociology, and other fields to explore these issues for a digital symposium on the Bill of Health blog. The focus of the symposium is to unpack how critical race theories and other strands of racial justice scholarship can inform health care, public health, and other areas of law to improve health outcomes among minorities.
To mark the launch of the symposium and to kick off the semester, a panel of contributors will participate in a moderated discussion of some of these pressing questions, including: Which social determinants of health have the greatest effects on race hierarchies? Does the health care system itself exacerbate racial health disparities? And which legislative changes, litigation strategies, or enforcement actions by federal agencies, might work as a tool to combat health disparities?
LINK  https://petrieflom.law.harvard.edu/events/details/race-health-and-health-law-policy
CONTACT INFO petrie-flom@law.harvard.edu
617-496-4662

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SURVEILLANCE IN AN ERA OF PANDEMIC AND PROTEST
Monday, September 21
3 p.m. ET
Online
RSVP at https://theintercept.com/2020/09/11/coronavirus-black-lives-matter-surveillance/

A live chat with Naomi Klein, Shoshana Zuboff, and Simone Browne

AS THIS SUMMER of pandemic and racial justice protests draws to a close, Naomi Klein will host a landmark conversation between Shoshana Zuboff, author of “The Age of Surveillance Capitalism,” and Simone Browne, author of “Dark Matters: On the Surveillance of Blackness.” The three authors will discuss how both governments and tech giants are using our moment of overlapping crises to push through discredited surveillance technologies that threaten privacy, democracy, and any hope of equality.

Early in the pandemic, Klein wrote that these forces have aligned to “advance a vision of a future in which our every move, our every word, our every relationship is trackable, traceable, and data-mineable.” For the privileged, “almost everything is home delivered, either virtually via streaming and cloud technology, or physically via driverless vehicle or drone.”

But, Zuboff warns, “We’re not necessarily locked into this deterministic narrative that too many pundits are hawking and the tech companies are salivating over — that post-Covid-19, we’re going to have comprehensive biosurveillance of all of society. … People are worried. People are asking questions.”

Racial justice movements are also winning major victories against surveillance technologies like facial recognition. And as Browne reminds us, “surveillance is nothing new to Black folks.” In “Dark Matters,” Browne traces modern surveillance practices back to the policing of Black lives under slavery, comparing the branding of slaves to present-day methods of tracking, surveilling, and commodifying people.

In this live conversation, Klein, Zuboff, and Browne will unpack the dangers of surveillance capitalism — and how we can rise to this crisis and create a fair and equitable future.

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Black Boston: Changing the Face of Politics
Monday, September 21
5pm–6pm ET
Online
RSVP at https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07eh9ee0fe00438443&oseq=&c=&ch=

In the last twenty years, Massachusetts has elected its first Black governor, first Black congresswoman, and Boston has had its first Black woman City Council President. How much progress have we made? What steps do we need to take to elevate new leaders, ensure equitable representation, and engage and enfranchise new voters?

Join the IOC, the Boston University Office of Diversity & Inclusion, and WBUR CitySpacefor Black Boston: Changing the Face of Politics, the third in a recurring discussion series featuring transformative Black leaders from across Greater Boston.

Speakers:
Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley, U.S. House of Representatives, Massachusetts 7th Congressional District; first Black woman elected to Congress from Massachusetts and the first Black Woman elected to the Boston City Council (At Large, 2010–2019)
Representative Nika Elugardo, Massachusetts House of Representatives, 15th Suffolk District; Graduate of Boston University School of Law
Andrea Campbell, Boston City Councilor, District 4; first Black woman to serve as Boston City Council President (2018–2020)
Moderated by Kimberly Atkins, Senior Opinion Writer and member of the Editorial Board, The Boston Globe; MSNBC Contributor; Graduate of Boston University School of Law and Boston University College of Communication

Register for more events in the Black Boston series at http://bu.edu/ioc/blackboston

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The Last Brahmin: Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. and the Making of the Cold War
Monday, September 21
5:30PM - 6:30PM
Online
RSVP at https://18308a.blackbaudhosting.com/18308a/The-Last-Brahmin-Henry-Cabot-Lodge-Jr-and-the-Making-of-the-Cold-War

Luke A. Nichter, Texas A&M University-Central Texas
Image entitled /2012/juniper/assets/section37/fall_2020/thumbnail_Nichter_jacket.jpg
A key figure in American foreign policy for three decades, Henry Cabot Lodge Jr. of Massachusetts, a well-heeled Eastern Establishment Republican, put duty over partisanship to serve as advisor to five presidents from Dwight Eisenhower to Gerald Ford and as United States Ambassador to the United Nations, Vietnam, West Germany, and the Vatican. Historian Luke A. Nichter gives us a compelling narrative of Lodge’s extraordinary and consequential life and his immense political influence.

Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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Real Change:  Mindfulness to Heal Ourselves and the World
Monday, September 21
7:00 PM
Online
RSVP at https://www.harvard.com/event/virtual_event_sharon_salzberg/

Free - $3 contribution suggested at registration
Harvard Book Store's virtual event series is excited to welcome SHARON SALZBERG—renowned meditation teacher and author of the acclaimed, bestselling book Real Happiness: A 28-Day Program to Realize the Power of Meditation—for a discussion of her latest book, Real Change: Mindfulness to Heal Ourselves and the World. She will be joined in conversation by celebrated meditation instructor TRUDY GOODMAN, founding teacher of InsightLA.

About Real Change
In today’s fractured world, we’re constantly flooded with breaking news that causes anger, grief, and pain. People are feeling more stressed out than ever, and in the face of this fear and anxiety they can feel so burnt out and overwhelmed that they end up frozen in their tracks and unable to do anything. In Real Change, Sharon Salzberg, a leading expert in lovingkindness meditation, shares sage advice and indispensable techniques to help free ourselves from these negative feelings and actions. She teaches us that meditation is not a replacement for action, but rather a way to practice generosity with ourselves and summon the courage to break through boundaries, reconnect to a movement that’s bigger than ourselves, and have the energy to stay active.

Consulting with veteran activists and social-change agents in a variety of fields, Salzberg collects and shares their wisdom and offers the best practical advice to foster transformation in both ourselves and in society. To help tame our inner landscape or chaos, Salzberg offers mindfulness practices that will help readers cultivate a sense of agency and stay engaged in the long-term struggle for social change.
Whether you’re resolving conflicts with a crotchety neighbor or combating global warming, Real Change will provide the fundamental principles and mindfulness practices to help guide you to the clarity and confidence to lift a foot and take the next step into a better world.

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Tuesday, September 22 & Thursday, September 24
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2020 Visions: Lunch & Learn Lightning Talks
Tuesday, September 22 & Thursday, September 24
Online
Zoom links below

Join the us on September 22 & 24 for a virtual celebration of 2020 Visions, the 10th annual Image Awards exhibition now on display in the Koch Institute Public Galleries. Celebrating biological beauty and transformative technologies, this year’s winning images embrace a variety of visualization techniques to examine the inner workings of microscopic communities and human health.

Each "lunch & learn" webinar session will include five "lightning talks" by image creators, along with participant questions and conversation about the winning images. Dive into natural and engineered systems to discover how scientific exploration and technological innovation are reshaping our vision of the world around us...and the future that is yet to come.

Schedule:
Tuesday, September 22 – 12:00 - 1:00 p.m. 
Brains & Brawn, presented by Ellen M. DeGennaro
Calling the Shots, presented by Morteza Sarmadi
Microbial Multiverse, presented by Rachel E. Szabo
Trick Or Treat, presented by Peter Bruno & Aslı Gökdemir
A Vax Seen, presented by Jacob T. Martin
Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/96481687104

Thursday, September 24 – 12:00 - 1:00 p.m.
20,000 Nanoleagues Under the SEM, presented by Rameen Shakur
Cloak & Swagger, presented by Arnav Chhabra
Co-Culture Club, presented by George Eng
Ocean Plankton, presented by Keith Ellenbogen
Visualizing Vasculature, presented by Genevieve Abbruzzese
Zoom link: https://mit.zoom.us/j/96178921498

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Tuesday, September 22 - Friday, October 1
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Collective Trauma Summit 2020:  The Power of Collective Healing
Tuesday, September 22 - Friday, October 1
Online
RSVP at https://collectivetraumasummit.com

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Tuesday, September 22
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Aging Brain Initiative Symposium: Cellular & Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration
Tuesday, September 22
9:00am to 5:00pm
Online
RSVP at https://picower.mit.edu/events/aging-brain-initiative-symposium

The Aging Brain Initiative is an ambitious interdisciplinary effort by MIT focusing on understanding neurodegeneration and efforts to find hallmarks of aging, both in health and disease. The Initiative is broad, made up of scientists in several areas, including systems neuroscience, cell biology, engineering and computational biology, with core investigators from the Departments of Biology, Brain & Cognitive Sciences, Biological Engineering, and Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Labs. The theme of this symposium is “Cellular & Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegeneration.”

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Speaking Truth to Power When Power Does Not Want Truth
Tuesday, September 22
3p.m. EDT
Online
RSVP at https://mccormack.umb.edu/events

A conversation with Robert Draper author of New York Times Magazine article, Unwanted Truth: Inside Trump's Battles with the Intelligence Community, and Margaret Henoch, former Central Intelligence Agency Chief of Station; moderated by Dean David Cash, McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies, UMass Boston.

Robert Draper is a writer at large for the New York Times Magazine and a contributing writer to National Geographic. He is the author of several books, including the New York Times bestseller Dead Certain: The Presidency of George W. Bush. He lives in Washington, DC.

Margaret Henoch retired after 24 years in the Directorate of Operations of the CIA. She served at CIA HQS and overseas and was promoted into the Senior Intelligence Service. Before joining the CIA, Margaret worked at SRI, International, based in Menlo Park, California, analyzing the avionics and design of Soviet aircraft, and before SRI, she worked for Ralph Nader at Public Interest Research Group. Henoch is a member of The Steady State.

Event Co-Sponsored by The Steady State
The Steady State is a group of more than 200 former government officials who have served in various capacities in the U.S. National Security and Homeland Security communities. As intelligence officers, defense policy makers, diplomats, and congressional staffers, they have served the country during Democratic and Republican administrations. Some of them are lifelong Democrats; others, Republicans; some resolutely independent. In March, the group endorsed Vice President Bidenand since then have engaged in speaking and writing to educate Americans about national security issues at stake in this election.

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CLIMATE AMBITION WITH GINA MCCARTHY, ANNIE LEONARD AND TAMARA TOLES O’LAUGHLIN
Tuesday, September 22
4:00 pm
RSVP at https://commonwealthclub.secure.force.com/ticket/#/instances/a0F3j00001CY4lSEAT

SPEAKERS
Annie Leonard, Executive Director, Greenpeace USA
Gina McCarthy,CEO, Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC)
Tamara Toles O'Laughlin, North America Director, 350.org

How are the leaders of some of the nations’ biggest environmental organizations responding to a year of race and health crises? 

Environmental groups like NRDC, 350.org, and Greenpeace helped move climate onto the presidential agenda last year, pushing Joe Biden and other Democrats’ stance on bold action. Now, organizers and advocates are backing recovery plans that bolster clean energy jobs, help strengthen communities, and dismantle systems that exploit people and the planet. How enthusiastic are they about Joe Biden’s $2 trillion climate plan? 

Can activism finally bring America’s political ambitions in line with climate science? Join us for a conversation on the state of our climate with Annie Leonard, executive director of Greenpeace, Gina McCarthy, CEO of the Natural Resources Defence Council (NRDC), and Tamara Toles O'Laughlin, North America director of 350.org.

We invite you to register for this free online event to receive an email with links to the livestream and a reminder to tune in. If you would like to help support production costs for this event, you may make a donation when you register. There will be an opportunity to submit audience questions to panelists via our YouTube livestream chat box.

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On This Land: Reframing Public Memory Webinar 
Tuesday, September 22
4:00 PM
Online
RSVP at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_61zcN9egTa-3AcHeW_3cEQ

How do monuments and memorials shape our understanding of place—and what we choose to forget? And how might we reframe public memory to address the harmful legacy of colonialism in our region?  

Kim Szeto, Program Director of Public Art, New England Foundation for the Arts will moderate a panel conversation among local artists Nia Holley (Nipmuc), Jonathan Perry (Aquinnah Wampanoag), and Erin Genia (Sisseton-Wahpeton Dakota) to explore how remembering and forgetting of Indigenous peoples and colonial history have shaped the landscape and collective consciousness of Greater Boston. Looking at several sites of significance for Indigenous communities in the region, they’ll unpack the meaning of these places through their personal histories and creative practices, and share their perspectives on the necessary role of Indigenous artists in shaping more just public spaces. 

Speakers: 
Erin Genia, Sisseton-Wahpeton Oyate, Artist in Residence for the City of Boston 
Nia Holley (Nipmuc) 
Jonathan Perry (Aquinnah Wampanoag), Culture bearer, leader, historian, artist and professional speaker 
Kim Szeto, Program Director of Public Art at the New England Foundation for the Arts (moderator) 

This event precedes “Centering Justice: Indigenous Artists’ Perspectives on Art in Public Space,” a virtual symposium organized through a collaboration among Indigenous artists and NEFA’s Public Art team. To learn more about this initiative, visit https://www.nefa.org/CenteringJustice 

“On This Land” is part of “Public Art, Public Memory.” This discussion series explores the role that planners, artists, and community leaders can play in cultivating more just and inclusive public spaces through public art and collective memory. Learn more here: https://www.mapc.org/resource-library/public-art-public-memory/

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The Horrid Deeds of our Enemies
Tuesday, September 22
5:15PM - 6:30PM
Online
RSVP at https://18308a.blackbaudhosting.com/18308a/The-Horrid-Deeds-of-our-Enemies

Lauren Duval, University of Oklahoma
Comment: Carolyn Eastman, Virginia Commonwealth University

The American Revolution was waged not only on the battlefield, but in the realm of culture. American homes and the wartime violence within them—particularly directed against women—were prominent subjects in novels and historical paintings. Reimagining women’s interactions with British soldiers solely as relationships of violence and deception, not volition, these narratives promoted a gendered vision of wartime domestic invasion and violation that would, in memory, come to define the war’s devastation and contribute to emergent ideas about the meaning of independence.

The Pauline Maier Early American History Seminar invites you to join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper. Learn more.

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Memory, Social Justice, and Mindfulness
Tuesday, September 22
5:30 – 6:30 p.m.
Online 
RSVP at https://edportal.harvard.edu/event/memory-social-justice-and-mindfulness

DETAILS This 4-week series from the Harvard Ed Portal builds off of Dr. Angel Acosta's 400 Years Project, which centers contemplative practice around the history of inequality in the US.
The goal of this workshop is to engage with, acknowledge, and awaken ourselves to the dynamics of racism and oppression at all levels. Each session will have a mix of practices, including:
Mindfulness and compassion practices
Walking through the 400 Years Timeline
Guided storytelling and reflection
By understanding how history lives in each of us and the systems which surround us, we can begin to heal the wounds of historical trauma, both individually and collectively.
Please note: As this is a cumulative workshop, attendance is strongly encouraged at all four sessions, to help build a safe space for discussion and trust.

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Just Us:  An American Conversation
Tuesday, September 22
7:00 PM
Online
RSVP at https://www.harvard.com/event/virtual_event_claudia_rankine/
$5 suggested - pay what you can - $35.25 (book, signed bookplate, and shipping included) 

Harvard Book Store's virtual event series is thrilled to welcome celebrated poet, essayist, and playwright CLAUDIA RANKINE—author of the award–winning Citizen: An American Lyric—for a discussion of her latest book, Just Us: An American Conversation.

About Just Us
As everyday white supremacy becomes increasingly vocalized with no clear answers at hand, how best might we approach one another? Claudia Rankine, without telling us what to do, urges us to begin the discussions that might open pathways through this divisive and stuck moment in American history.

Just Us is an invitation to discover what it takes to stay in the room together, even and especially in breaching the silence, guilt, and violence that follow direct addresses of whiteness. Rankine’s questions disrupt the false comfort of our culture’s liminal and private spaces—the airport, the theater, the dinner party, the voting booth—where neutrality and politeness live on the surface of differing commitments, beliefs, and prejudices as our public and private lives intersect.

This brilliant arrangement of essays, poems, and images includes the voices and rebuttals of others: white men in first class responding to, and with, their white male privilege; a friend’s explanation of her infuriating behavior at a play; and women confronting the political currency of dying their hair blond, all running alongside fact-checked notes and commentary that complements Rankine’s own text, complicating notions of authority and who gets the last word.

Sometimes wry, often vulnerable, and always prescient, Just Us is Rankine’s most intimate work, less interested in being right than in being true, being together.

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Confronting Disinformation: A Conversation with Audrey Tang
Tuesday, September 22
7:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://shorensteincenter.org/event/confronting-disinformation-conversation-audrey-tang/

SPEAKER(S)  Audrey Tang, Taiwan’s Digital Minister in charge of Social Innovation
DETAILS  Join us for a conversation with Audrey Tang, Taiwan’s Digital Minister in charge of Social Innovation, moderated by  Joan Donovan, Research Director of the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy.
Audrey Tang is Taiwan’s Digital Minister in charge of Social Innovation. Audrey is known for revitalizing the computer languages Perl and Haskell, as well as building the online spreadsheet system EtherCalc in collaboration with Dan Bricklin. In the public sector, Audrey served on Taiwan national development council’s open data committee and K-12 curriculum committee; and led the country’s first e-Rulemaking project. In the private sector, Audrey worked as a consultant with Apple on computational linguistics, with Oxford University Press on crowd lexicography, and with Socialtext on social interaction design. In the social sector, Audrey actively contributes to g0v (“gov zero”), a vibrant community focusing on creating tools for the civil society, with the call to “fork the government.”

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Blacker, Brighter Futures: Afrofuturism and Apocalypse
Tuesday, September 22
8pm
Online
RSVP at https://www.crowdcast.io/e/afrofuturism-and/register
Cost:  $8.50

Explore the mythic and media landscapes of the black radical imagination where afrofuturism and apocalypse meet with artist and mythologist Dr. Li Sumpter. Get familiar with key concepts of world building and contemporary mythmaking through the lens of popular media, afrofuturism and current local and global crises. From climate change and coronavirus to racial injustice and food insecurity, Dr. Sumpter will examine thematic connections between speculative fiction and historic headlines, revealing archetypal and aesthetic patterns of apocalypse. 

During this talk, you'll understand Afrofuturism through art, activism and radical visions of artists and filmmakers from across the African diaspora who are imagining a brighter, blacker future into reality. 

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Wednesday, September 23
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The Rise of the Green Economy
Wednesday, September 23
9:30am - 12pm EDT
Online
RSVP at https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/17701/433808

COP26: Investor Action on Climate Webinar Series Webinar 3
AGENDA
Welcome 
Fiona Reynolds, CEO PRI
Waqas Samad, Director of Information Services, London Stock Exchange Group, CEO of FTSE Russell 
Keynote speaker: Commissioner Rostin Behnam, U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission
Recovery, Green Growth and International co-operation 
Nigel Topping, High-Level Champion for Climate Action COP26
Measuring the Size & scale of the green economy
Lee Clements, Head of Sustainable Investment Solutions, FTSE Russell
Lily Dai, Senior Research Analyst, Sustainable Investment, FTSE Russell
Panel: The Role of Taxonomies
Chair: Joy Williams, Senior Advisor, climate strategy, Mantle314 & Former Chair of the New York State Common Retirement Fund’s Decarbonization Advisory Panel 
Dr. MA Jun, Director of Centre for Finance & Development at Tsinghua University, Chairman of China Green Finance Committee 
Peter Johnson, Director, Scotiabank & Chair of Canadian Transition Taxonomy & Sustainable Finance Technical Committee 
Helena Viñes Fiestas,Global Head of Stewardship and Policy, member of Experts Group at European Commission, Deputy Head of Sustainability, BNP Paribas Asset Management
The Inevitable Policy Response: Research from PRI
Jason Eis, Executive Director, Vivid Economics 
Panel: Capital Allocation to the Green Economy: Investors who have or who are taking action
Chair: Faith Ward, Co-Chair, TPI and Chief Responsible Investment Officer, Brunel Pensions Partnerships 
Craig Mackenzie, Head of Strategic Asset Allocation, Aberdeen Standard 
Herman Bril, Director of Office of Investment Management, United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund
Geneviève Bouthillier, Managing Director, Private Mid-Market Companies & Stewardship Investing, CDPQ

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Cyber Attacks On Cars - How It's Dangerous and How to Safeguard!
Wednesday, September 23, 2020
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM EDT
Online
RSVP at https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/8215995733526/WN_8CHjsnqQSjqsNZajGTt_Og **

When we think of cyber attacks, cars are probably the last thing that comes to mind! Join us on September 23rd to learn more about how to hack cars and how to safeguard yourself from bad actors!
Introductions by organizer
Conversations
Networking + Q&A
Closing remarks

Rahul Deshmukh has been in Cyber Security industry from last 2 decades and has extensive experience of research in IoT, Automotive Security and OT Security. He has extensive experience on AIML and using analytics for detection and prevention of Cyber threats. He has previously worked with Tech Giants like me Cisco, Juniper, Nokia and HCL Technologies and contributed for Cyber Security industry. He is presently doing research on Cyber Security and Terrorism.

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Gutman Library Book Talk: Common-Sense Evidence: The Education Leader’s Guide to Using Data and Research
Wednesday, September 23
12 – 1 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_HkKebPVkTEaQ_7GVVdLccw

SPEAKER(S)  Moderator: Bridget Terry Long, Dean and Saris Professor of Education and Economics at the Harvard Graduate School of Education
Carrie Conaway, Author and senior lecturer on education at HGSE
Sonja Santelises, CEO of Baltimore City Public Schools
Peggy Brookins, President & CEO of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards
DETAILS  Written by two leading experts in education research and policy, Common-Sense Evidence is a concise, accessible guide that helps education leaders find and interpret data and research, and then put that knowledge into action. The authors walk readers through the processes for determining whether research is relevant and convincing; explain useful statistical concepts; and show how to quickly search for and scan research studies for the necessary information.
Save 40 percent on the paper edition of Common-Sense Evidence. Mention promo code CSEV20 on orders placed via hepg.org or 888-437-1437. Offer expires Sept. 30, 2020.

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Cold Wars: Asia, the Middle East, Europe
Wednesday, September 23
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Online
RSVP at https://ssp.mit.edu/events/2020/cold-wars-asia-the-middle-east-europe

SSP Wednesday Seminar with speaker Lorenz Lüthi, McGill University.

What was the Cold War that shook world politics for the second half of the twentieth century? Standard narratives focus on Soviet-American rivalry as if the superpowers were the exclusive driving forces of the international system. Lorenz M. Lüthi offers a radically different account, restoring agency to regional powers in Asia, the Middle East and Europe and revealing how regional and national developments shaped the course of the global Cold War. Despite their elevated position in 1945, the United States, Soviet Union and United Kingdom quickly realized that their political, economic, and military power had surprisingly tight limits given the challenges of decolonization, Asian-African internationalism, pan-Arabism, pan-Islamism, Arab–Israeli antagonism, and European economic developments. As a series of Cold Wars ebbed and flowed, the three world regions underwent structural changes that weakened or even severed their links to the global ideological clash, leaving the superpower Cold War as the only major conflict that remained by the 1980s.

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Leaving New Orleans: A Personal Urban History
Wednesday, September 23
12:00 pm
Online
RSVP at https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_iglU64NyTkCxr6iN3WiyMg

As the Beatrice Shepherd Blane Fellow, Leslie M. Harris is completing “Leaving New Orleans: A Personal Urban History.” She uses memoir and family, urban, and environmental histories to explore the multiple meanings of New Orleans in the nation, from its founding through its uncertain future amid climate change.

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Compassionate Communication Workshop Series
Wednesday September 23, September 30, October 7, October 14
Optional but encouraged follow-up session: Wednesday, November 4, 12pm – 1:00PM
12pm – 1PM
Online
RSVP at https://www.metrowestmediationservices.org/compassionate-communication-training
Cost: $50 (for 4 session workshop)
Financial assistance available - Please contact us if cost is an issue.

In this 4-session virtual workshop series, you will learn about and
practice mindful communication for managing conflicts.*

Managing conflict is not easy - especially when the issues are complex,
emotional, and divisive. Conversations can become frustrating and
challenging. We think we are right; we want to be heard and understood; we
don’t know why the other person thinks the way they do. We fall into “fight
or flight”: cycles of attacking and defending, or avoiding and not dealing
with what matters.

There is a better way.

Through Compassionate Communication, we can break the cycles of escalation
and avoidance, meet our needs, manage our conflicts, and transform our
relationships by productively engaging in potentially divisive issues.

In this series, you will gain:
Confidence to express yourself in a way that does not provoke defensiveness in the listener
Proficiency in listening compassionately and authentically to different perspectives
Awareness of normal escalating reactions in difficult conversations and how to break the pattern
Communication skills that effectively resolve conflict
Connection to a community of people jointly exploring compassionate communication

Limited to 24 Participants
This will be a highly interactive and participatory course.
Participants are required to attend all 4 sessions, be willing to engage
in small group and partner discussions, and be on Zoom with video active
for the entire series.

Register or learn more at
https://www.metrowestmediationservices.org/compassionate-communication-training

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The Campaign for (White) Christian America: Lauren R. Kerby in Conversation with Jeff Sharlet on White Evangelicals in the 2020 Election
Wednesday, September 23
1 – 2 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_iA3CSgZxSQ2i7bzKVGbFaQ

DETAILS  This event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. Registration link is forthcoming.
As the 2020 presidential election nears, join Lauren R. Kerby and Jeff Sharlet for a discussion of the politics of white evangelicals in the U.S. today. Kerby's book, Saving History, offers a starting point for this important conversation about how race, nationalism, and Christianity become entangled for many white evangelicals through what they learn from their leaders about American history. Their political commitments are baffling to many observers, but this conversation will explore how white evangelicals’ relationship to the nation offers a key to understanding their continued allegiance to Donald Trump.
Lauren R. Kerby is a lecturer on religious studies at Harvard Divinity School and the education specialist for the Religious Literacy Project. She earned her PhD from Boston University. She is the author of Saving History: How White Evangelicals Tour the Nation's Capital and Redeem a Christian America (University of North Carolina Press, 2020).
Jeff Sharlet, associate professor of English at Dartmouth College, is the nationally bestselling author or editor of six books of literary journalism, including The Family and Sweet Heaven When I Die. Sharlet’s work has earned numerous awards, including the National Magazine Award, the Molly Ivins Prize, and the Outspoken Award. He’s a contributing editor for Harper’s, Rolling Stone, and Virginia Quarterly Review, and a frequent contributor to GQ. At Dartmouth College, he is the publisher of 40 Towns.
CONTACT CSWR, 617.495.4476

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Hot Topics in Computing: Harnessing Synthetic Biology and Deep Learning to Fight Pathogens, Prof. James Collins
Wednesday, September 23
2:00pm to 3:00pm
Online
RSVP at 

Abstract:  Synthetic biology is bringing together engineers, physicists and biologists to model, design and construct biological circuits out of proteins, genes and other bits of DNA, and to use these circuits to rewire and reprogram organisms. These re-engineered organisms are going to change our lives in the coming years, leading to cheaper drugs, rapid diagnostic tests, and synthetic probiotics to treat infections and a range of complex diseases. In this talk, we highlight recent efforts to harness synthetic gene networks, programmable cells and deep learning to create diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines for fighting pathogens, including SARS-CoV-2.

Bio:  Jim Collins is the Termeer Professor of Medical Engineering & Science and Professor of Biological Engineering at MIT, as well as a Member of the Harvard-MIT Health Sciences & Technology Faculty. He is also a Core Founding Faculty member of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, and an Institute Member of the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard. He is one of the founders of the field of synthetic biology, and his research group is currently focused on using synthetic biology to create next-generation diagnostics and therapeutics. Professor Collins' patented technologies have been licensed by over 25 biotech, pharma and medical devices companies, and he has helped to launch a number of companies, including Synlogic and Sherlock Biosciences. He has received numerous awards and honors, including a Rhodes Scholarship and a MacArthur "Genius" Award, and he is an elected member of all three national academies - the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the National Academy of Medicine.

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Do Environmental Markets Cause Environmental Injustice? Evidence from California's Carbon Market
Wednesday, September 23
4:30PM TO 5:45PM
Zoom

Danae Hernandez-Cortes and Kyle C. Meng, University of California, Santa BarbaraSeminar in Environmental Economics and Policy
https://canvas.harvard.edu/courses/74265
Contact Name: Jason Chapman
jason_chapman@hks.harvard.edu
616-496-8054

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Introduction to XR's Strategic Theories
Wednesday, September 23 
5:30 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMvcumuqT8vE9TEusE6Mg8KbS8TWC8M_U81

Join us for a discussion about the movement theory behind XR's disruptive climate justice activism. We will talk about the political system breakdowns and how to solve them, the strategic context behind our demands, the broader ecosystem of the climate movement, and more. 30 min overview followed by 30 min discussion.

If you're starting to learn about XR, you may also want to check out 1) a "Headed for Extinction" talk which covers the scientific urgency of the climate crisis and how we can act and 2) our orientations which explain how you can act in the name of XR if you follow our principles and how to plug in. Both can be found on our calendar There is an online version of the "Headed for Extinction" talk on YouTube

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Monument Man: The Life and Art of Daniel Chester French
Wednesday, September 23 
5:30PM - 6:30PM
Online
RSVP at https://18308a.blackbaudhosting.com/18308a/Monument-Man-The-Life-and-Art-of-Daniel-Chester-French

Harold Holzer, Hunter College
Daniel Chester French is America's best-known sculptor of public monuments, having created the statue for the Lincoln Memorial, the John Harvard statue, and The Minute Man in Concord. This new biography combines rich personal details from French's life with a nuanced study of his artistic evolution. It explores French’s diligent dedication to perfecting his craft with beautiful archival photographs of his life and work.
Please note, this is an online event held on the video conference platform, Zoom. Registrants will receive an email with links to join the program.

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People, Power, and Place: A History of Organizing and Movement Building Workshop Series
Wednesday, September 23
5:30pm - 7:00pm EST
September 30
5:30pm - 7:00pm EST
October 14
5:30pm - 7:00pm EST
Online
RSVP at https://melkinginstitute.org/events/people-power-and-place-history-organizing-and-movement-building-workshop-series
Cost:  Suggested Donation: $15 per workshop; $45 entire series

You will receive the Zoom Link for this training after you've registered, closer to the date of the Training.

There is a rich history of organizing around issues that affect low income people and people of color- specifically Black people-in Greater Boston. From the powerful movement that stopped the extension of the ten-lane I-95 highway, an extensive urban renewal effort that destroyed many communities, and the formation of the community development industry- Greater Boston contains a wealth of knowledge from the past on how we can organize around similar issues we face now in the present.

Join the Mel King Institute and Madison Park Development Corporation (MPDC) as we explore the history of community organizing and major events that have taken place in Greater Boston. During this three-part series- we'll address topics such as redlining, the Community Reinvestment Act, the 2008 foreclosure crisis, explore the role of tenants' rights, the repeal of rent control, and our state's public housing history.

Participants will be able to:
Learn from people who were change makers and on the front lines of major historic events
Engage in exercises that will help conceptualize how organizers, residents, and allies-built power and overcame challenges
Apply lessons to their current work and on how to move forward to address present issues
We encourage participants to attend all workshops to get a full breadth of knowledge on these topics and the full context of all major events. There is also an opportunity to attend a specific workshop of your choice that interests you. Each session will cover the following:
Workshop I - September 23, 2020; 5:30pm - 7:00pm ONLINE vis Zoom
Learn about the movement that brought many leaders throughout Greater Boston together to stop the extension of the I-95 Highway. The workshop will feature Karilyn Crockett, author of People vs. Highways.

Workshop II - September 30, 2020; 5:30pm - 7:00pm ONLINE via Zoom
Learn about Boston's Tenants Rights activism from the 1970s - 1990s, the repeal of rent control laws, and the work of people who fought for public housing tenants' rights. Additionally you'll learn about the formation of the Community Reinvestment Coalition in order to stop racial discrimination in mortgage lending. The workshop will feature speakers current and former public housing resident leaders from Greater Boston and organizers from MAHA.

Workshop III - October 14, 2020; 5:30pm - 7:00pm ONLINE via Zoom
Learn about the foreclosure crisis that occurred on 2007-2013 and how people organized locally, statewide, and nationally to address the issue. In addition, gain perspective on how organizations are working to increase funding for affordable housing today. The workshop will feature speakers including representatives from the HERO Coalition and City Life Vida Urbana.

This series is created in partnership with Madison Park Development Corporation and sponsored by NeighborWorks America.

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OK Boomer, Let's Talk:  How My Generation Got Left Behind
Wednesday, September 23
7:00 PM
Online
RSVP at https://www.harvard.com/event/virtual_event_jill_filipovic/
Free - $3 contribution suggested at registration

Harvard Book Store's virtual event series welcomes acclaimed writer JILL FILIPOVIC—author of The H-Spot: The Feminist Pursuit of Happiness—for a discussion of her latest book, OK Boomer, Let's Talk: How My Generation Got Left Behind.

About OK Boomer, Let's Talk
In Ok Boomer, Let’s Talk, journalist (and Millenial) Jill Filipovic tells the definitive story of her generation. Talking to gig workers, economists, policy makers, and dozens of struggling Millennials drowning in debt on a planet quite literally in flames, Filipovic paints a shocking and nuanced portrait of a generation being left behind:
Millennials are the most educated generation in American history—and also the most broke.
Millennials hold just 3 percent of American wealth. When they were the same age, Boomers held 21 percent.
The average older Millennial has $15,000 in student loan debt. The average Boomer at the same age? Just $2,300 in today’s dollars.
Millennials are paying almost 40 percent more for their first homes than Boomers did.
American families spend twice as much on healthcare now than they did when Boomers were young parents.

Filipovic shows that Millennials are not the avocado-toast-eating snowflakes of Boomer outrage fantasies. But they are the first American generation that will do worse than their parents. “OK, Boomer” isn’t just a sarcastic dismissal—it’s a recognition that Millennials are in crisis, and that Boomer voters, bankers, and policy makers are responsible. Filipovic goes beyond the meme, upending dated assumptions with revelatory data and revealing portraits of young people delaying adulthood to pay down debt, obsessed with “wellness” because they can’t afford real healthcare, and struggling to #hustle in the precarious gig economy.

Ok Boomer, Let’s Talk is at once an explainer and an extended olive branch that will finally allow these two generations to truly understand each other.

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Lee and Nile Albright Annual Symposium:  Give Black Scientists a Place in This Fight- COVID-19 and the Racial Divide
Wednesday, September 23
7:00 – 8:30 pm
Online
RSVP at https://www.mos.org/give-scientists-a-place

Adrianne Gladden-Young, senior research associate in Pardis Sabeti’s lab at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard and author of the piece “Give Black Scientists A Place in This Fight” from The Atlantic, joins the Museum of Science for an evening examining the overwhelming effects systemic racism has had on the COVID-19 pandemic. With nearly a quarter of Americans who have died from complications of the coronavirus being within the Black community, it is clear Black Americans are tremendously vulnerable to the virus due to deep-rooted issues of race in our country. Through her work studying COVID-19, Gladden-Young is calling for the scientific community and public-health world to confront these deep inequities and the racial divide of our nation head-on.

Don’t miss this important symposium with Adrianne Gladden-Young as she shares her research on our current pandemic, emphasizing how and why systemic racism has allowed the Black community to be disproportionally impacted and affected, and why it is necessary that the health establishment begins to engage Black scientists as leaders and problem-solvers.

Please consider making a gift to support #MOSatHome and our SubSpace virtual Fall season at donate.mos.org/mosathome and become a vital partner in helping us provide access to free STEM experiences online.

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Native Bees: Our Pollination Powerhouses
Wednesday, September 23
7:00pm to 8:30pm
Online
RSVP at https://grownativemass.org/Our-Programs/evenings-experts

A free lecture by Heather Holm on Sept 23 at 7:00pm, presented by Grow Native Massachusetts.

Grow Native Massachusetts is proud to present our 2020 Evenings with Experts lecture series! These talks are free and open to all—check our website for registration information.

Join us for this talk with Heather Holm, the author of Bees: An Identification and Native Plant Forage Guide.

Native bees are the most important and effective pollinators for our flowering plants. Although they play a crucial role in sustaining biodiversity, they are poorly understood and under threat from human activity. Heather Holm will teach us how to recognize common bee genera, and enlighten us about their fascinating life cycles, nesting habitat, and foraging needs. Come learn more about the mutualistic relationships that they have with native plants— a powerful reminder that the salvation of one is inextricably linked to the proper stewardship of the other.

Heather Holm is an expert on pollinators whose first book, Pollinators of Native Plants, brought her national attention. She is a sought-after speaker who is passionate about educating audiences. Her recent book, Bees: An Identification and Native Plant Forage Guide, won the 2018 American Horticultural Society Book Award.

Thank you to our community partners— the Cambridge Public Library, Mount Auburn Cemetery and the Boston Society of Landscape Architects— for their support of this series.

Continuing education credits will be available.

More information is available on our website: https://grownativemass.org/Our-Programs/evenings-experts

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Thursday, September 24
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Doing More With Less: Economically-efficient Management of Pavement Networks
Thursday, September 24
11:00am to 12:00pm
Online
RSVP at https://mit.webex.com/mw3300/mywebex/default.do?nomenu=true&siteurl=mit&service=6&rnd=0.7561419524067577&main_url=https%3A%2F%2Fmit.webex.com%2Fec3300%2Feventcenter%2Fevent%2FeventAction.do%3FtheAction%3Ddetail%26%26%26EMK%3D4832534b00000004818a54dc07d2c79cea91cdd33e603dd43905d82fff6aed2e99a6ebbecd100bea%26siteurl%3Dmit%26confViewID%3D172020172594381816%26encryptTicket%3DSDJTSwAAAASgt5fZoB3-ZdivQt0rFbnjzmWiZLHKapX6Hqaa1zchvg2%26

Budgets for transportation agencies are insufficient to deal with increasing traffic levels and as a consequence, the condition of pavement networks is worsening. This presentation will highlight the outcomes of research from the MIT Concrete Sustainability Hub on three tools for economically-efficient management of pavement networks including competitive paving prices, life cycle cost analysis, and asset management.

This webinar will be presented by CSHub Executive Director Jeremy Gregory.

The MIT Concrete Sustainability Hub (CSHub) webinar series offers information of general interest to members of the building, paving, and construction communities, as well as to educators, students, journalists, and law and policy-makers interested in the environmental and economic impacts of decision-making concerning infrastructure. Videos of past webinars are archived to the CSHub YouTube Channel at https://www.youtube.com/user/CSHubMIT

Webinars are free and open to the public. Presentations are geared toward a lay audience.

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When Fast-Growing Great Powers Slow Down: Historical Evidence and Implications for China
Thursday, September 24
12:15 – 2 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://harvard.zoom.us/j/96550562494?pwd=REx3b1RWaVYxZWdhVW5Hbk9Ra3JEQT09#success

SPEAKER(S)  Michael Beckley, Associate Professor, Tufts University
LINK  https://www.belfercenter.org/event/when-fast-growing-great-powers-slow-down-historical-evidence-and-implications-china
CONTACT INFO  susan_lynch@harvard.edu

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2020 State of Demand-Side Energy Management in PJM
Thursday, September 24
2 p.m.- 3 p.m. ET
Online
RSVP at https://info.cpowerenergymanagement.com/WBN-PJM_SOTM_2020_LP-Registration.html

2020 was expected to be a year of change in PJM. As the region now works its way through the COVID-19 pandemic’s maze, organizations are reexamining their energy management strategies in search of optimization for an increasingly uncertain future. 

Join CPower on September 24, 2020, at 2 pm ET for a one-hour webinar designed to give organizations like yours the demand-side energy management insights you need to make the most of 2020 and beyond in PJM. 

Topics to be covered include:
Policy and regulatory changes in PJM
How Zonal Aggregation can help you optimize demand response performance
Opportunities to monetize distributed energy resources in PJM
How energy efficiency projects can lead to revenue
And more...
CPower’s PJM experts Dann Price, Bruce Campbell, and Ed Drew will host this live webinar that will include a question and answer session.

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JULIET SCHOR AND HAZEL HENDERSON IN CONVERSATION
Thursday, September 24
2pm
Online
RSVP at https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_aJJBRZjfR2armHkUQy_ZkQ

Moderated by David Bollier
In celebration of 40 years of the Annual E. F. Schumacher Lectures, and in anticipation of the October 25, 2020 Lectures with Kali Akuno and George Monbiot, we are highlighting the work of past speakers, asking for updates of their earlier remarks, and inviting them to reflect on current conditions.

On Thursday, September 24 at 2pm Eastern, Juliet Schor and Hazel Henderson will engage in a live, virtual conversation on Zoom moderated by David Bollier. They will be reflecting on their original talks given current political, economic, and social realities, with comments on each other’s work. Registration is free. A question and answer period will follow initial presentations. If you are unable to attend, a recording of the event will be available.

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VIRTUAL EVENT: Starr Forum: Russia’s Information War on America
Thursday, September 24
3:30pm to 4:30pm
Online
RSVP at  http://bit.ly/RussiasInfoWar

Peter Pomerantsev is a Soviet-born British journalist, author and TV producer. He is a visiting senior fellow at the Institute of Global Affairs at the London School of Economics, where he co-directs the Arena program. He is also an associate editor at Coda Story, a position he has held since at least 2015. Pomerantsev has written two books about Russian disinformation and propaganda: Nothing Is True and Everything Is Possible (2014) and This Is Not Propaganda (2019).

Nina Jankowicz studies the intersection of democracy and technology in Central and Eastern Europe. She is currently a disinformation fellow at the Wilson Center’s Science and Technology Innovation Program. Jankowicz is the author of How To Lose the Information War: Russia, Fake News, and the Future of Conflict. Her writing has been published by The New York Times, The Washington Post, and The Atlantic. She is a frequent commentator on disinformation and Russian and Eastern European affairs. 

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Author E.J. Dionne, Jr. with Code Red: How Progressives and Moderates Can Unite to Save Our Country
Thursday, September 24
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM
Online
RSVP at https://boston-public-library.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_biwlULJ6QUqbqO5DOuR9Ug

Boston Public Library presents this virtual program in The Arc of History: Contested Perspectives featuring BPL President David Leonard, who will moderate this program. We kindly ask that people who are interested in attending please register in advance. While we are not setting a limit on the number of registrants, we do want to note that our Zoom webinar platform has a capacity of 100 people. Anyone exceeding that number will be automatically directed to the live-stream on our YouTube page, which may be accessed via the following:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5S1IQFki7WM&feature=emb_title

Looking at recent U.S. history, presidents, and politics, The New York Times bestselling author and Washington Post columnist provides insight into where we are today, and where we could be headed in this election year. E.J. Dionne, Jr. offers a blueprint for how progressives and moderates can come together to build a lasting political majority. He explores innovative ideas about the economy, identity politics, nationalism, and foreign policy to present a genuinely fresh take on America’s current political crisis. Don’t miss hearing from this celebrated thought-leader at this important time.

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Money for Nothing: An Author Talk with Thomas Levenson and Carl Zimmer
Thursday, September 24
7:30pm to 8:30pm
Online
RSVP at http://mitmuseum.mit.edu/program/money-nothing-author-talk-thomas-levenson-and-carl-zimmer

Join the MIT Museum for an evening discussion with author Thomas Levenson and his friend and fellow science writer Carl Zimmer as they explore the intersection of science, math, and the birth of the modern financial system that took place in London in the early 1700’s by way of Levenson’s newly published book, “Money for Nothing: The Scientists, Fraudsters, and Corrupt Politicians who Reinvented Monday, Panicked a Nation, and Make the World Rich”

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Friday, September 25
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Economy-Wide Decarbonization Pathways, Policies, and Programs in New England
Friday, September 25
9:00am-12:15pm
Online
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/economy-wide-decarbonization-pathways-policies-and-programs-in-new-england-tickets-114354808310
Cost:  $0 -$90

Convener/Moderator:  Dr. Jonathan Raab, Raab Associates, Ltd.
Forging Decarbonization Plans & Essential Policies
Co-Keynotes:  Secretary Kathleen Theoharides, Massachusetts EEA
Commissioner Katie Dykes, Connecticut DEEP 
New England’s two largest states, Massachusetts and Connecticut, are currently engaged in detailed modeling and analysis of decarbonization pathways, and concurrently developing comprehensive decarbonization roadmaps to meet their clean energy/climate goals and mandates. Both states are on track to complete major plans this year: the Clean Energy & Climate Plan in Massachusetts and the Integrated Resource Plan in Connecticut. These states build on a historic foundation of innovative programs and policies, and look to new ones in every sector, including a current effort to forge a “cap and invest” program in the transportation sector (aka TCI).

Hear from the leaders of these initiatives on what they see emerging as the key ingredients to ensure that their states, and New England as a whole, are on the glide path to economy-wide decarbonization.

Implementing Decarbonization Strategies — It Takes The Whole Village
Successfully decarbonizing New England’s economy will require assertive and coordinated policies and programs at every level of government (federal, state, and local). This will also require a myriad of investments and behavior changes from all our citizens and businesses. To do this right, we will all need to be more intentional in addressing climate justice issues in both the design and the implementation of these policies and programs.

Our esteemed panelists will share the important activities that they are leading; elucidate the need for coordinated local, state, and federal action; and discuss better ways to integrate climate justice into all of these efforts.

Hal Harvey is the CEO of Energy Innovation (and former founder and CEO of the Energy Foundation). Hal will discuss the policies and programs the U.S. federal government needs to implement in order to do its part to decarbonize the economy, drawing on the firm’s recent major national study on achieving a 90% zero carbon grid by 2035 and its accompanying policy piece Rewiring the U.S. for Economic Recovery, as well as its other multi-sector federal work.

Hannah Pingree is the Director of Maine Governor's Office of Policy Innovation/Future and is the former Speaker of the Maine House of Representatives. Hannah will discuss Maine’s current Climate Action Plan update process, including the key recommendations emerging from its innovative and comprehensive Climate Action Council process. 

Chris Cook is the Chief of Environment, Energy & Open Space for the City of Boston. Chris will discuss the implementation of Boston’s 2019 Climate Action Plan, including the next wave of policies and programs the city is undertaking as well as the cutting-edge approach it used to incorporate climate justice issues in the development of its Plan.

Eugenia Gibbons is the Director of Climate Policy at Healthcare Without Harm and the Co-Chair of Massachusetts’ Climate Justice Working Group. Eugenia will discuss the design and implementation of carbon mitigation strategies that explicitly benefit environmental justice populations and redress longstanding burdens in historically marginalized communities. 

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The Centenary of the 19th Amendment: New Reflections (Online Conference)
Friday, September 25
9:15 AM – 3:45 PM EDT
Online
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-centenary-of-the-19th-amendment-new-reflections-online-conference-registration-113916938630

Join legal and political science scholars to discuss lessons learned from the centenary of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution.

This one-day conference will feature presentations and discussions by legal and political science scholars, political practitioners, and others reflecting on lessons from the centenary of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution for understanding the past, present, and future of gender, empowerment, representation and citizenship rights. The conference is sponsored by the Boston University School of Law, the Department of Political Science, and the Research in American Politics Workshop. Conference organizers and contacts are: Linda C. McClain (BU Law), lmcclain@bu.edu and Virginia Sapiro (Political Science), vsapiro@bu.edu.

For program and schedule information, visit http://www.bu.edu/law/2020/01/29/19th-amendment-program/

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How We Decide to Get Serious about Climate Solutions: Politics, Communication, and Framing
Friday, September 25
10:00 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://climateadaptationforum.org/event/political-action/
Cost:  $5 - $15

Webinar login information is included in the registration confirmation email.

Climate change has evolved into a hot-button, politically charged issue whether you are on the right or left. Communicating messages across audiences is challenging not only because the threat has been politicized but because climate change is often not seen as the emergency it is.

Join the Climate Adaptation Forßum and our panel of national leaders to explore climate change communication and framing efforts across the political spectrum. Our panel will answer today’s most pressing questions: How is climate change internalized by different audiences? How have the panelists succeeded in communicating messages across audiences? Does it matter whether climate is framed as a greenhouse gas emissions problem or an adaptation/resilience problem? How does the framing of climate change intersect with structural racism?

Renowned climate change journalists, communication experts, and behavioral analysts will address why more people won’t respond to the threats of climate change with urgency. Are there easy ways to implement knock-out strategic messaging and remove obstacles to ambitious action? Do most people respond to messages of danger, opportunity, injustice, or something else?

This is a can’t-miss virtual event!
Speaker Agenda
Release of the Sustainable Solutions Lab Report – Views that Matter: Race and Opinions on Climate Change of Boston Area Residents
Lorena M. Estrada-Martinez, Ph.D., MPH, Assistant Professor of Environment and Public Health, School for the Environment. University of Massachusetts Boston
Climate Across the Spectrum: Bare-Knuckles Politics in the Field
Jacqueline Patterson, Director, NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program
Benji Backer. President and Founder, American Conservation Coalition
Psychology, Semantics, and Strategy: Accelerating Response to Climate Change
Elke Weber, Ph.D., Gerhard R. Andlinger, Professor in Energy and the Environment, Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs, Princeton University
Justin Worland, Washington D.C.-based correspondent for TIME
covering energy and the environment
John Marshall, Senior Client Advisor

Lippincott Forum Co-Chairs:
David W. Cash, Ph.D., Dean, John W. McCormack Graduate School of Policy and Global Studies, University of Massachusetts Boston
Sarah Finnie Robinson, Director, “The 51 Percent Project”, Institute for Sustainable Energy; Senior Fellow and Adjunct Clinical Professor, College of Communication, Boston University
Kathryn Meng Elmes, Ph.D., Carbon Strategic Partnerships, Indigo Agriculture
Alex Papali, Forum Steering Committee Member, Political Director, Center for Economic Democracy

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The Hispanic Republican:  The Shaping of an American Political Identity, from Nixon to Trump
Friday, September 25
12:00 PM
Online
RSVP at https://www.harvard.com/event/virtual_event_geraldo_cadava/
Free - $3 contribution suggested at registration

Harvard Book Store's virtual event series welcomes GERALDO CADAVA—associate professor of history and Latina and Latino studies at Northwestern University—for a discussion of his latest book, The Hispanic Republican: The Shaping of an American Political Identity, from Nixon to Trump.

About The Hispanic Republican
In the lead-up to every election cycle, pundits predict that Latino Americans will overwhelmingly vote in favor of the Democratic candidate. And it’s true—Latino voters do tilt Democratic. Hillary Clinton won the Latino vote in a “landslide,” Barack Obama “crushed” Mitt Romney among Latino voters in his reelection, and, four years earlier, the Democratic ticket beat the McCain-Palin ticket by a margin of more than two to one. But those numbers belie a more complicated picture. Because of decades of investment and political courtship, as well as a nuanced and varied cultural identity, the Republican party has had a much longer and stronger bond with Hispanics. How is this possible for a party so associated with draconian immigration and racial policies?

In The Hispanic Republican, historian and political commentator Geraldo Cadava illuminates the history of the millions of Hispanic Republicans who, since the 1960s, have had a significant impact on national politics. Intertwining the little understood history of Hispanic Americans with a cultural study of how post–World War II Republican politicians actively courted the Hispanic vote during the Cold War (especially Cuban émigrés) and during periods of major strife in Central America (especially during Iran-Contra), Cadava offers insight into the complicated dynamic between Latino liberalism and conservatism, which, when studied together, shine a crucial light on a rapidly changing demographic that will impact American elections for years to come.

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THE UNRAVELING OF AMERICA  - does COVID-19 signal the end of the American era?  
Friday September 25
1 pm (EST)
Online
RSVP at https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_wzIXl8VfSOSqN43skbTVLw

WADE DAVIS recently attracted global attention with this opinion piece in Rolling Stone magazine. https://rol.st/3i9nwHa
Davis will speak about why he wrote the piece and why he believes it struck such a chord, around the world.  He will also talk about his latest book, "MAGDALENA: River of Dreams" which brings to life the story of the great Río Magdalena, illuminating Colombia's complex past, present, and future. National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence for more than a decade, Davis became an honorary Citizen of Colombia in 2018.

Professor Davis is an internationally acclaimed anthropologist, who currently holds the Leadership Chair in Cultures and Ecosystems at Risk, at the University of British Columbia. He holds degrees in anthropology and biology and received his Ph.D. in ethnobotany, all from Harvard University.  

Please join us for this compelling conversation with an exceptional individual, who seems to have been almost everywhere.
Register in advance for this webinar:
https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_wzIXl8VfSOSqN43skbTVLw

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

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Virtual: Helen Macdonald with Kathryn Schulz, Vesper Flights [Ticketed]
Friday, September 25
7:00pm
Online
RSVP at https://www.portersquarebooks.com/product/virtual-ticket-signed-copy-vesper-flights
Cost:  $27
An entry link will be emailed to ticket holders in the week of the event. The signed book included in your ticket can be shipped or picked up, simply choose your preferred method at check out. Books will be available prior to the event, once signed books have arrived.*

Porter Square Books is pleased to present a virtual talk with Helen Macdonald, author of H Is For Hawk, for the release of her new book Vesper Flights, in conversation with Kathryn Schulz! *This virtual event is ticketed, and your ticket includes a signed copy of the book.

Animals don't exist in order to teach us things, but that is what they have always done, and most of what they teach us is what we think we know about ourselves.

In Vesper Flights Helen Macdonald brings together a collection of her best loved essays, along with new pieces on topics ranging from nostalgia for a vanishing countryside to the tribulations of farming ostriches to her own private vespers while trying to fall asleep.

Meditating on notions of captivity and freedom, immigration and flight, Helen invites us into her most intimate experiences: observing the massive migration of songbirds from the top of the Empire State Building, watching tens of thousands of cranes in Hungary, seeking the last golden orioles in Suffolk's poplar forests. She writes with heart-tugging clarity about wild boar, swifts, mushroom hunting, migraines, the strangeness of birds' nests, and the unexpected guidance and comfort we find when watching wildlife.

By one of this century's most important and insightful nature writers, Vesper Flights is a captivating and foundational book about observation, fascination, time, memory, love and loss and how we make sense of the world around us.

Helen Macdonald is a writer, poet, naturalist and historian of science. Her book H is for Hawk won many prizes, including the Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction, the Costa Book of the Year, the Prix du Meilleur Livre Etranger in France, and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Kirkus Prize for Nonfiction. She is a frequent contributor to the New York Times Magazine, and lives in Suffolk, England.

Kathryn Schulz is a staff writer at The New Yorker. In 2016, she won the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing for “The Really Big One,” her story on seismic risk in the Pacific Northwest. Previously, she was the book critic for New York, the editor of the environmental magazine Grist, and a reporter and editor at The Santiago Times, in Santiago, Chile. Her new book, Lost & Found, will be published next year. 

Join our virtual event on Friday, 9/25 by purchasing a ticket! Ticket holders will receive a link to join the virtual event in the week of the event. Your ticket includes a signed copy of the book, which can be shipped or picked up, and will be available to you before the event once we have received signed books.

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Saturday, September 26
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Fredrik Logevall discusses JFK: Coming of Age in the American Century
Saturday, September 26
7:00 PM EDT
Online
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fredrik-logevall-discusses-jfk-coming-of-age-in-the-american-century-tickets-118220547841
Cost:  $0 – $48

Join Brookline Booksmith and the JFK National Historic Site in a conversation with author Fredrik Logevall and Seth Blumenthal!

Register to receive a Zoom link on the day of the event. You can register for free, leave a donation (thank you for your support!), or buy the book to enter the event. If you don't receive a confirmation email after registering , contact us right away.

Order Books for Pickup or Delivery
STORE PICKUP- Pick up your book in person at Brookline Booksmith (click for directions). You will receive an email alert after the event when your book is ready.
SHIPPING - Have your book shipped via USPS priority mail. Shipping is only available in the United States. 

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Monday, September 28
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The Border Crisis and the Future of India-China Relations
Monday, September 28
11:00am to 12:30pm
Online
RSVP at https://watson.brown.edu/southasia/events/2020/border-crisis-and-future-india-china-relations

South Asian Politics Seminar. Join Shivshankar Menon (Brookings), Tanvi Madan (Brookings) and Taylor Fravel (MIT) to discuss recent conflicts surrounding the border between China and India. Moderator: Vipin Narang (MIT)

Joint Seminar sponsored by MIT, Harvard, and Brown University

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MIT Program on Atmospheres, Oceans and Climat [PAOC] Colloquium - Zeljka Fuchs
Monday, September 28
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Online
RSVP at http://paocweb.mit.edu/events/paoc-colloquium

The PAOC Colloquium is a weekly interdisciplinary seminar series that brings together the whole PAOC community. Seminar topics include all research concerning the physics, chemistry, and biology of the atmospheres, oceans and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars take place on Monday from 12-1pm. 

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Webinar: Trust, transparency & digitalization
Monday, September 28
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Online
RSVP at https://mit.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_4B1ouyJmQAu4Oyn1KrKsjg

Denmark is among the most digital countries in the EU according to the Digital Economy and Society Index (DESI) by the European Commission, and it was named the most digital country in the world in the International Digital Economy and Society Index 2018. But at a time when the threat for misuse of data is real and new concerns about data ethics are emerging, are Danes being too naïve? Or could their high standards on digital responsibility and transparency lead the way to a more harmonized digital future?

Join our discussion about digitalization in the Scandinavian context with Søren Juul Jørgensen, former CEO at the Innovation Center Denmark in Silicon Valley, research fellow at the Center for Human Rights and International Justice at Stanford University and Founder of Forest Avenue and Rasmus Hauch, Chief Technology Officer at 2021.AI. This session will be moderated by Kathleen Thelen, Ford Professor of Political Science at MIT and Faculty Director for the MIT-Denmark Program.

This webinar is part of the MIT-Denmark data-driven future series. In this series, we will focus on digitalization in a Scandinavian context and the role trust has played and continues to play in digitalizing Denmark. We will discuss digitalization of everyday activities and public services, how tech artificial intelligence can used to make the world a little greener, as well as some of the challenges we face in an increasingly high-tech society.

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Climate Change and the American Mind
Monday, September 28
12pm
Online
RSVP at https://www.belfercenter.org/program/environment-and-natural-resources#!energy-policy-seminar-series

Anthony Leiserowitz, Yale University
Hosted each semester at HKS, the Energy Policy Seminar Series provides a public forum for students, faculty, and interested community members to deepen their knowledge of current issues surrounding energy systems and sustainability. The EPSS features a range of speakers, from academic experts to science journalists to climate activists.

Energy Policy Seminar 
https://www.belfercenter.org/program/environment-and-natural-resources#!energy-policy-seminar-series
Contact Name:  Amanda Sardonis
amanda_sardonis@hks.harvard.edu

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Conversation With Jill Lepore
Monday, September 28
6:00 pm
Online
RSVP at https://ci.ovationtix.com/35123/production/1031298?performanceId=10565989

Meghna Chakrabarti, host of On Point, will join renowned historian and writer Jill Lepore for a conversation about her latest book, "If Then: How the Simulmatics Corporation Invented the Future." The book is a revelatory account of the Cold War origins of the data-mad, algorithmic twenty-first century.

This event, in partnership with Brookline Booksmith, is free and open to the public but advance registration is requested. You can pre-order "If Then" here.

Want to submit questions before the live event? Click here to send them to us.

About "If Then"
A revelatory account of the Cold War origins of the data-mad, algorithmic twenty-first century, from the author of the acclaimed international bestseller "These Truths."

The Simulmatics Corporation, launched during the Cold War, mined data, targeted voters, manipulated consumers, destabilized politics, and disordered knowledge—decades before Facebook, Google, and Cambridge Analytica. Jill Lepore, best-selling author of "These Truths," came across the company’s papers in MIT’s archives and set out to tell this forgotten history, the long-lost backstory to the methods, and the arrogance, of Silicon Valley.

Founded in 1959 by some of the nation’s leading social scientists—“the best and the brightest, fatally brilliant, Icaruses with wings of feathers and wax, flying to the sun”—Simulmatics proposed to predict and manipulate the future by way of the computer simulation of human behavior. In summers, with their wives and children in tow, the company’s scientists met on the beach in Long Island under a geodesic, honeycombed dome, where they built a “People Machine” that aimed to model everything from buying a dishwasher to counterinsurgency to casting a vote. Deploying their “People Machine” from New York, Washington, Cambridge, and even Saigon, Simulmatics’ clients included the John F. Kennedy presidential campaign, the New York Times, the Department of Defense, and dozens of major manufacturers: Simulmatics had a hand in everything from political races to the Vietnam War to the Johnson administration’s ill-fated attempt to predict race riots. The company’s collapse was almost as rapid as its ascent, a collapse that involved failed marriages, a suspicious death, and bankruptcy. Exposed for false claims, and even accused of war crimes, it closed its doors in 1970 and all but vanished. Until Lepore came across the records of its remains.

The scientists of Simulmatics believed they had invented “the A-bomb of the social sciences.” They did not predict that it would take decades to detonate, like a long-buried grenade. But, in the early years of the twenty-first century, that bomb did detonate, creating a world in which corporations collect data and model behavior and target messages about the most ordinary of decisions, leaving people all over the world, long before the global pandemic, crushed by feelings of helplessness. This history has a past; "If Then" is its cautionary tale.

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Voice, Choice, and Action:  The Potential of Young Citizens to Heal Democracy
Monday, September 28
7:00 PM
Online
RSVP at https://www.harvard.com/event/virtual_event_felton_earls_and_mary_carlson/
Free - $3 contribution suggested at registration

Harvard Book Store's virtual event series welcomes FELTON EARLS—Professor Emeritus of Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School—and MARY CARLSON—former Associate Professor of Psychiatry (Neuroscience) at Harvard Medical School—for a discussion of their co-authored book, Voice, Choice, and Action: The Potential of Young Citizens to Heal Democracy. They will be joined in conversation by journalist ALEX KOTLOWITZ, author of the award-winning books There Are No Children Here and An American Summer: Love and Death in Chicago.

About Voice, Choice, and Action
Voice, Choice, and Action is the fruit of the extraordinary personal and professional partnership of a psychiatrist and a neurobiologist whose research and social activism have informed each other for the last thirty years. Inspired by the 1989 United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, Felton Earls and Mary Carlson embarked on a series of international studies that would recognize the voice of children. In Romania they witnessed the consequences of infant institutionalization under the Ceaușescu regime. In Brazil they encountered street children who had banded together to advocate effectively for themselves. In Chicago Earls explored the origins of prosocial and antisocial behavior with teenagers. Children all over the world demonstrated an unappreciated but powerful interest in the common good.

On the basis of these experiences, Earls and Carlson mounted a rigorous field study in Moshi, Tanzania, which demonstrated that young citizens could change attitudes about HIV/AIDS and mobilize their communities to confront the epidemic. The program, outlined in this book, promoted children’s communicative and reasoning capacities, guiding their growth as deliberative citizens. The program’s success in reducing stigma and promoting universal testing for HIV exceeded all expectations.

Here in vivid detail are the science, ethics, and everyday practice of fostering young citizens eager to confront diverse health and social challenges. At a moment when adults regularly profess dismay about our capacity for effective action, Voice, Choice, and Action offers inspiration and tools for participatory democracy.

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Tuesday, September 29
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Virtual Community Engagement
Tuesday, September 29
9:00am - 12:00pm
Online
RSVP at https://melkinginstitute.org/events/community-enagement 
Cost:  $50

You will receive the Zoom Link for this training after you've registered, closer to the date of the Training.

Nowadays - it seems that everyone has had to embrace virtual ways of staying connected. Whether it is municipalities, institutions, and non-profit organizations - community engagement strategies have had to adjust across the board. The Metropolitan Area Planning Council, MetroBoston's Regional Planning Agency, has also had to make the shift, and their Community Engagement staff have developed this training for engagement practitioners who are actively looking to develop and practice their skills in using tools to increase digital participation.

This training will also allow you to connect with other engagement practitioners who are navigating the new normal of virtual participation. Together we can learn how to utilize methods and strategies to increase the impact and effectiveness of your engagement. This training will also allow us to reflect on the challenges that different engagement practitioners are sharing in this moment.

If you are hoping to learn about the tools and approaches that will help you engage stakeholders virtually, consider signing up for this training.

At registration please share your engagement challenges so that we can meet your needs as best as possible. We look forward to connecting with you. If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to Iolando Spinola, Community Engagement Specialist, ispinola@mapc.org.

Registration deadline: Monday, September 28, 2020
Email shirrondaa@macdc.org for Group Rates

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Tuesday Seminar Series: How COVID has Changed Latin American Economics
Tuesday, September 29
12 – 1:20 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_-A3OpVdDTDeoa5qHAkSpsA

SPEAKER(S)  Andres Velasco, Dean of the School of Public Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science; former Finance Minister of Chile
Ana Maria Ibanez, Professor of Economics, Universidad de los Andes; Economics Principal Advisor for the Interamerican Development Bank
Daniela Campello, Adjunct Professor, Brazilian Public and Business Administration School; Getulio Vargas Foundation
Gustavo Flores Macias, Associate Vice Provost for International Affairs and Associate Professor, Cornell University
Moderator: Frances Hagopian, Jorge Paulo Lemann Senior Lecturer on Government, Harvard University
CONTACT INFO drclas@fas.harvard.edu
LINK  https://drclas.harvard.edu/event/how-covid-has-changed-latin-american-economics?delta=0

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Author Talk: Photoromance by Paola Bonifazio
Tuesday, September 29
12:30 PM – 1:30 PM EDT
Online
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/author-talk-photoromance-by-paola-bonifazio-tickets-116744370555

MIT Press Live! Presents an author talk with Paola Bonifazio, author of Photoromance
Bonifazio examines the “convergence culture” of Italian media as photoromance magazines dispersed their content across multiple formats, narrative conventions, editorial and business strategies, and platforms. Bonifazio discusses the media habits of photoromance readers; the use of photoromances to promote political, religious, and social agendas, including a campaign for “birth control in comics”; and long-term fandom. While publishers built lifelong relationships with their readers, the readers built a common identity and culture.

About the Author
Paola Bonifazio is Associate Professor in the Department of French and Italian at the University of Texas at Austin. She is the author of Schooling in Modernity: The Politics of Sponsored Films in Postwar Italy.

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"No unseated crowd is liable to be orderly" : Organizing Audiences around Spectacle in the Industrial Era
Tuesday, September 29
5:15PM - 6:30PM
Online
RSVP at https://18308a.blackbaudhosting.com/18308a/No-unseated-crowd-is-liable-to-be-orderly-Organizing-Audiences-around-Spectacle-in-the-Industrial

Scott Kushner, University of Rhode Island
Comment: Derek Miller, Harvard University
Crowd control technologies—turnstiles, bleachers, stanchions, and seats—channel bodies through the spaces of cultural performance: theater, music, and sport. The increasing rationalization and standardization of crowd control in the early 20th century corresponds with a critical and popular understanding of crowds as dangerous and destabilizing. This paper mines archival evidence to show how industrial-age crowd control was framed as technology that ordered masses (into lines or rows), thereby rendering masses orderly (cooperative, docile, and non-threatening).

The Dina G. Malgeri Modern American Society & Culture Seminar invites you to come join the conversation. Seminars bring together a diverse group of scholars and interested members of the public to workshop a pre-circulated paper.

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Memory, Social Justice, and Mindfulness
Tuesday, September 29 
5:30 – 6:30 p.m.
Online
RSVP at https://edportal.harvard.edu/event/memory-social-justice-and-mindfulness

DETAILS  This 4-week series from the Harvard Ed Portal builds off of Dr. Angel Acosta's 400 Years Project, which centers contemplative practice around the history of inequality in the US.
The goal of this workshop is to engage with, acknowledge, and awaken ourselves to the dynamics of racism and oppression at all levels. Each session will have a mix of practices, including:
Mindfulness and compassion practices
Walking through the 400 Years Timeline
Guided storytelling and reflection
By understanding how history lives in each of us and the systems which surround us, we can begin to heal the wounds of historical trauma, both individually and collectively.
Please note: As this is a cumulative workshop, attendance is strongly encouraged at all four sessions, to help build a safe space for discussion and trust.

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Lowell Lecture with Barbara F. Berenson: Votes for Women: Massachusetts Leaders in the Woman Suffrage Movement
Tuesday, September 29, 2020 Add to Calendar
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM
Online
RSVP at https://wgbh.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_ilNyA8ceRKWQEl3pAa0bpA

Join the Boston Public Library in partnership with the GBH Forum Network for an online Lowell Lecture with Barbara F. Berenson, author of Massachusetts in the Woman Suffrage Movement. BPL President David Leonard will moderate this program, which is part of our "Arc of History: Contested Perspectives" series. This conversation is also part of the esteemed Lowell Lecture series at the Boston Public library. People who wish to attend will need to register at the GBH Forum Network event page.

Barbara Berenson is the author of Massachusetts in the Woman Suffrage Movement: Revolutionary Reformers (2018), Boston in the Civil War: Hub of the Second Revolution (2014), and Walking Tours of Civil War Boston: Hub of Abolitionism (2011, 2d ed. 2014). She is the co-editor of Breaking Barriers: The Unfinished Story of Women Lawyers and Judges in Massachusetts(2012). Barbara earned her undergraduate degree from Harvard College and her law degree from Harvard Law School. She is on the boards of Boston By Foot and the Royall House & Slave Quarters. She worked as a Senior Attorney at the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court until June 2019. She has taught a course on woman suffrage at Tufts University. She is currently a lecturer at Harvard Law School. Please see http://www.barbarafberenson.comfor more information.

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Being Property Once Myself:  Blackness and the End of Man and Owed:  Poems
Tuesday, September 29
7:00 PM
Online
RSVP at https://www.harvard.com/event/virtual_event_joshua_bennett/
Free - $3 contribution suggested at registration

Harvard Book Store's virtual event series welcomes acclaimed poet Dr. JOSHUA BENNETT—the Mellon Assistant Professor of English and Creative Writing at Dartmouth College and author of The Sobbing School: Poems—for a discussion of his latest books, Being Property Once Myself: Blackness and the End of Man and the poetry collection Owed. He will be joined in conversation by writer and scholar Dr. IMANI PERRY, author of the award–winning biography, Looking for Lorraine: The Radiant and Radical Life of Lorraine Hansberry.

About Being Property Once Myself
Throughout US history, black people have been configured as sociolegal nonpersons, a subgenre of the human. Being Property Once Myself delves into the literary imagination and ethical concerns that have emerged from this experience. Each chapter tracks a specific animal figure—the rat, the cock, the mule, the dog, and the shark—in the works of black authors such as Richard Wright, Toni Morrison, Zora Neale Hurston, Jesmyn Ward, and Robert Hayden. The plantation, the wilderness, the kitchenette overrun with pests, the simultaneous valuation and sale of animals and enslaved people—all are sites made unforgettable by literature in which we find black and animal life in fraught proximity.
Joshua Bennett argues that animal figures are deployed in these texts to assert a theory of black sociality and to combat dominant claims about the limits of personhood. Bennett also turns to the black radical tradition to challenge the pervasiveness of antiblackness in discourses surrounding the environment and animals. Being Property Once Myself is an incisive work of literary criticism and a close reading of undertheorized notions of dehumanization and the Anthropocene.

About Owed
Gregory Pardlo described Joshua Bennett's first collection of poetry, The Sobbing School, as an "arresting debut" that was "abounding in tenderness and rich with character," with a "virtuosic kind of code switching." Bennett's new collection, Owed, is a book with celebration at its center. Its primary concern is how we might mend the relationship between ourselves and the people, spaces, and objects we have been taught to think of as insignificant, as fundamentally unworthy of study, reflection, attention, or care. Spanning the spectrum of genre and form—from elegy and ode to origin myth—these poems elaborate an aesthetics of repair. What's more, they ask that we turn to the songs and sites of the historically denigrated so that we might uncover a new way of being in the world together, one wherein we can truthfully reckon with the brutality of the past and thus imagine the possibilities of our shared, unpredictable present, anew.

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Living With Heat - Urban Land Institute report on expected climate impact in Boston
https://boston.uli.org/about/impact/

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Solar bills on Beacon Hill: The Climate Minute Podcast
https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-cs87v-b6dbac

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Envision Cambridge citywide plan
https://www.cambridgema.gov/CDD/News/2019/5/~/media/A0547DC0640E4ABD86B519CA6FEEFF38.ashx

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Climate Resilience Workbook
https://sustainablebuildingsinitiative.org/toolkits/climate-resilience-guidelines/climate-resilience-workbook

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Sustainable Business Network Local Green Guide
SBN is excited to announce the soft launch of its new Local Green Guide, Massachusetts' premier Green Business Directory!
To view the directory please visit: http://www.localgreenguide.org
To find out how how your business can be listed on the website or for sponsorship opportunities please contact Adritha at adritha@sbnboston.org

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Boston Food System
"The Boston Food System [listserv] provides a forum to post announcements of events, employment opportunities, internships, programs, lectures, and other activities as well as related articles or other publications of a non-commercial nature covering the area's food system - food, nutrition, farming, education, etc. - that take place or focus on or around Greater Boston (broadly delineated)."
The Boston area is one of the most active nationwide in terms of food system activities - projects, services, and events connected to food, farming, nutrition - and often connected to education, public health, environment, arts, social services and other arenas.   Hundreds of organizations and enterprises cover our area, but what is going on week-to-week is not always well publicized.
Hence, the new Boston Food System listserv, as the place to let everyone know about these activities. 

To subscribe to the Boston Food System list:
https://elist.tufts.edu/wws/subscribe/bfs
To be removed / unsubscribe from the Boston Food System list:
https://elist.tufts.edu/wws/signoff/bfs

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The Boston Network for International Development (BNID) maintains a website (BNID.org) that serves as a clearing-house for information on organizations, events, and jobs related to international development in the Boston area. BNID has played an important auxiliary role in fostering international development activities in the Boston area, as witnessed by the expanding content of the site and a significant growth in the number of users.
The website contains:
A calendar of Boston area events and volunteer opportunities related to International Development - http://www.bnid.org/events
A jobs board that includes both internships and full time positions related to International Development that is updated daily - http://www.bnid.org/jobs
A directory and descriptions of more than 250 Boston-area organizations - http://www.bnid.org/organizations
Also, please sign up for our weekly newsletter (we promise only one email per week) to get the most up-to-date information on new job and internship opportunities -www.bnid.org/sign-up
The website is completely free for students and our goal is to help connect students who are interested in international development with many of the worthwhile organizations in the area.
Please feel free to email our organization at info@bnid.org if you have any questions!

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Boston Maker Spaces - 41 (up from 27 in 2016) and counting:  https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=zGHnt9r2pQx8.kfw9evrHsKjA&hl=en
Solidarity Network Economy:  https://ussolidarityeconomy.wordpress.com
Bostonsmart.com's Guide to Boston:  http://www.bostonsmarts.com/BostonGuide/

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Links to events at over 50 colleges and universities at Hubevents:  http://hubevents.blogspot.com

Thanks to
MIT Events:  http://calendar.mit.edu
Harvard Events:  http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/harvard-events/events-calendar/
Harvard Environment:  http://environment.harvard.edu/events/calendar/
Sustainability at Harvard:  http://green.harvard.edu/events
Boston Science Lectures:  https://sites.google.com/view/bostonsciencelectures/home
Meetup:  http://www.meetup.com/
Eventbrite:  http://www.eventbrite.com/
Startup and Entrepreneurial Events:  http://www.greenhornconnect.com/events/
Cambridge Civic Journal:  http://www.rwinters.com
Cambridge Happenings:   http://cambridgehappenings.org
Cambridge Community Calendar:  https://www.cctvcambridge.org/calendar
Adam Gaffin’s Universal Hub:  https://www.universalhub.com/
Extinction Rebellion:  https://xrmass.org/action/
Sunrise Movement:  https://www.facebook.com/SunriseBoston/events/

Mission-Based Massachusetts is an online discussion group for people who are interested in nonprofit, philanthropic, educational, community-based, grassroots, and other mission-based organizations in the Bay State. This is a moderated, flame-free email list that is open to anyone who is interested in the topic and willing to adhere to the principles of civil discourse. To subscribe email 
mbm-SUBSCRIBE@missionbasedmassachusetts.net

If you have an event you would like to see here, the submission deadline is 11 AM on Sundays, as Energy (and Other) Events is sent out Sunday afternoons.