Sunday, April 19, 2015

Energy (and Other) Events - April 19, 2015

Energy (and Other) Events is a weekly mailing list published most Sundays covering events around the Cambridge, MA and greater Boston area that catch the editor's eye.

Hubevents  http://hubevents.blogspot.com is the web version.

If you wish to subscribe or unsubscribe to Energy (and Other) Events email gmoke@world.std.com

What I Do and Why I Do It:  The Story of Energy (and Other) Events
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-i-do-and-why-i-do-it.html

---------------------------------------------------------
*******************************************

----------------------
Monday, April 20
----------------------

12pm  Current Trends in Liberation Theology
12pm  "How Much Energy do Building Energy Codes Really Save? Evidence from California"
12:15pm  The Politics of Openness: Technology, Corruption and Participation in Indian Public Employment
4pm  Beyond the Arab Transitions: Drivers of Long Term Change in the Middle East
6pm  African Americans Against the Bomb: Nuclear Weapons, Colonialism, and the Black Freedom Movement
7pm  Environmental Lawlessness

-----------------------
Tuesday, April 21
-----------------------

MIT Earth Days
12pm  Classes of defense for computer systems
12pm  Media & Politics: What's Next? A Conversation with the Shorenstein Fellows
4pm  Wahhabism: From Provincial Heresy to Arabian Hegemony
4:10pm  Getting to Yes (or No): Making Ballot Initiatives More Voter-Friendly and Deliberative
4:30pm  Aging Successfully
5pm  The Smartest Targets for the World
6pm  Manufacturing Across Scales:  Carbon Nanotube Sensors
6pm  Boston Quantified Self Show&Tell #BQS19 (NERD)
6pm  Boston New Technology April 2015 Product Showcase #BNT52
7pm  CafeSci Boston: "Why 60 Minutes? 5000 Years of Tradition and Science"

---------------------------
Wednesday, April 22
---------------------------

HLS Earth Day Celebration
11:30am  Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Earth and Lighting Fair
11:30am  Harvard Celebrates Earth Day
12pm  Libraries as a Platform: Enabling libraries to become community centers of meaning
12pm  Privacy: The Core Driving Feature of New Technology Services
12pm  3D Printed Bionic Nanomaterials
12:30pm  The Chinese Dream of Great Renewal: Challenges for China and the World
1:30pm  Earth Day at Fresh Pond: Think Globally - Lend a Hand Locally!
4pm  CIC Technology Showcase
4:10pm  Adopting a Cleaner Technology: The Effect of Driving Restrictions on Fleet Turnover
5pm  Housing Dynamics and Displacement in Cambridge
5:30pm  Sustainability unConference 2015
6pm Boston Living with Water Competition Pin-up
6:30pm  A National Policy for Food Health and Wellbeing in a Changing Climate
6:30pm  The Health of Democracy: Polarization and Ideologies
6:30pm  Solving for X: Preparing Our Children for an Uncertain World
6:30pm  Cambridge Science Festival Panel: Restoring Ecosystems to Reverse Global Warming
7pm  The Health of Democracy: A Polarized Public

------------------------
Thursday, April 23
------------------------

8am  Art Technology Psyche
11:45am  A Critical Comparison of Regulatory Regimes for Offshore Oil and Gas in the U.S., U.K, and Norway
12pm  New England Groundfish: A Story About Managing People
12pm  Managing Water in the West: the US Government's Role as the Largest Supplier of Fresh Water in the United States
12pm  How Interfaces Demand Obedience
12:15pm  Are You Certain? Leaders, Misplaced Certainty, and War in U.S. Foreign Policy
12:15pm  New Perspectives on Large-Scale Systems Change
2pm  The Benefits of Biomass Combined Heat and Power
3pm  A STEAM Conversation: Learning through the Lens of Art & Science
3:30pm   "It Takes MOXIE to Send People to Mars"
4pm  An Atmospheric Measurement Network and Modeling Framework to Quantify Methane Emissions from Natural Gas Losses in the Boston Urban Region
4pm  What Went Wrong?: The Causes of Democratic Breakdown in Egypt
4pm  Making Education Relevant in the Face of Global Challenges
5pm  Investing in Lower Income Communities: A Continuing Conversation
5pm  President’s Challenge Demo Day 2015
5:30pm  Fab Lab Hub Fundraiser
6pm  Islands: Natural Laboratories of Evolution
6pm  Thursday Evening Lecture Series: Global Health Includes US: Poverty, Race and Health in Mississippi
6pm  Google Wearables Challenge Final Smackdown
6:30pm  A Conversation with Krzysztof Wodiczko
6:30pm  Ford Hall Forum:  A Bumpy Ride
6:30pm  POVERTY, INC. - The Movie
7pm  SciEx: Extreme Science Film Festival

--------------------
Friday, April 24
--------------------

7:45am  Open Access, Copyright, and Academic Scholarship: Harvard and Beyond
8am  MIT Sustainability Summit 2015 - Farming, Food, and the Future
9am  Architecture & CAST Symposium: Active Matter Summit, Programming Materials to Sense, Transform, and Self-Assemble
10am  Friday Morning Seminar: Epidemic Projections and the Politics of Reckoning During the Ebola Crisis
12pm  Spring Music Concert: Dance Music from Northeastern Brazil
12:15pm  E-Waste Regimes in China and Japan: "Scalvagers" and Environmental Justice
12:30pm  Data: A Love Story: How Data Science, and A Great Deal of Tinkering, Created the Biggest Dating Site in the U.S.
1pm  Innovations in Urban Design
4pm  Lessons from Ferguson: Leadership in Times of Civil Unrest
4:30pm  How to become a Science YouTube Sensation: 3 million+ views and counting
6pm  The State of Solar in Massachusetts
7pm  'Exploring Neurobiology and Music,' Presented by the Harvard Museum of Natural History

-----------------------
Saturday, April 25
-----------------------

8am  MIT Sustainability Summit 2015 - Farming, Food, and the Future
RootsCamp MA
10am  PirateCon 2015
1pm  Pick a Tree, Plant a Tree: an Arbor Day workshop with Ranger Jean
3pm  Trends in Technology (part of Cambridge Science Festival)
3pm  Film: "Into the Ovoid: an Ovella"

----------------------
Sunday, April 26
----------------------

8am  Economic Prosperity For Peace Conference
5pm  Science Festival After Party at Aeronaut
7:30pm  Hi-Fi Sci Art: Preserving Our Planet

----------------------
Monday, April 27
----------------------

12pm  MASS Seminar - Clara Orbe (GSFC)
12pm  Low-carbon leapfrogging and globalization: How China developed its solar PV industry
12:10pm  Urban Nature / Human Nature
12:15pm  "Cities, Technologies and Political Imaginaries"
2pm  Israel’s Triangular Cyber Eco-system, Academia, Government and Industry
4pm  The Value of Regulatory Discretion: Estimates from Environmental Inspections in India - joint with IO and Development
5pm  The Arab Networked Public Sphere: Social Mobilization Post-Revolutions
5pm  Gadda Goes To War
5:15pm  Driving the Future: Combating Climate Change with Cleaner, Smarter Cars
7pm  Catalyst Conversations Faces, Genes, Patterns, Stories: Alberta Chu and Murray O. Robinson
7pm  Art, Culture and Technology Lecture: MICHAEL RAKOWITZ

-----------------------
Tuesday, April 28
-----------------------

12pm  Intellectual Privacy
12pm Religion in the News - Inflicting Death: Should the State Execute Dzhokhar Tsarnaev?
12:30pm  Looking inside moons with gravity and topography
4pm  Building Newborn Minds in Virtual Worlds
4:30pm  Migration, National Security, and New forms of Policing: Dubai and Abu Dhabi
6pm  Boston Green Drinks - April Happy Hour
6pm  Disease Gone Global:  What Causese Epidemics?
7pm  Healthy Places in the Transition Century
7pm  Science at MIT: From the Cold War to the Climate Crisis

---------------------------------------------------------
*******************************************

My rough notes on some of the events I go to and notes on books I’ve read are at:
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com

Making Conflict Work
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2015/04/making-conflict-work.html

---------------------------------------------------------
*******************************************

----------------------
Monday, April 20
----------------------

Current Trends in Liberation Theology
WHEN  Mon., Apr. 20, 2015, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Andover 117, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Humanities, Lecture, Religion, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR HDS Religious Anarchist Collective
SPEAKER(S)  Filipe Maia

---------------------------

"How Much Energy do Building Energy Codes Really Save? Evidence from California"
Monday, April 20
12:00PM - 1:30PM
Harvard, HKS, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

with Arik Levinson, Georgetown University

ETIP/Consortium Energy Policy Seminar
http://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/

Contact Name:  Louisa Lund
Louisa_Lund@hks.harvard.edu

--------------------------------

The Politics of Openness: Technology, Corruption and Participation in Indian Public Employment
Monday, April 20
12:15PM - 2:00PM
Harvard, Room 100F, Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Rajesh Veeraraghavan, UC Berkeley/Harvard Berkman Center

Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to sts@hks.harvard.edu by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/

Contact Name:  Shana Rabinowich
sts@hks.harvard.edu

--------------------------------

Beyond the Arab Transitions: Drivers of Long Term Change in the Middle East
WHEN  Mon., Apr. 20, 2015, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, HKS, Nye Conference Room A, Taubman Building, Fifth Floor, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR The Middle East Initiative
SPEAKER(S)  A seminar with Paul Salem, Vice President for Policy and Research at the Middle East Institute in Washington, D.C.
Moderated by Michael C. Hudson, MEI Visiting Scholar Spring 2015.
COST  Free and Open to the Public
LINK http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/events/6605/beyond_the_arab_transitions.html

-----------------------------

African Americans Against the Bomb: Nuclear Weapons, Colonialism, and the Black Freedom Movement
WHEN  Mon., Apr. 20, 2015, 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sever 113, Harvard Yard, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Humanities, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Cosponsored by the Mahindra Humanities Center's Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Seminar on Violence and Non-Violence and the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research.
SPEAKER(S)Vincent J Intondi, author, African Americans Against the Bomb: Nuclear Weapons, Colonialism, and the Black Freedom Movement
Elaine Scarry, Walter M. Cabot Professor of Aesthetics and General Theory of Value, Harvard University
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO 617-495-0738; humcentr@fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Free and open to the public. Seating is limited.
Learn more about the book here: http://www.sup.org/books/title/?id=23490
LINK http://mahindrahumanities.fas.harvard.edu/content/vincent-j-intondi-his-new-book-emafrican-americans-against-bomb-nuclear-weapons-colonialism

-----------------------------

Environmental Lawlessness
Monday, April 20
7:00–8:30pm
Arnold Arboretum, Hunnewell Building, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain
RSVP at https://my.arboretum.harvard.edu/Info.aspx?DayPlanner=1391&DayPlannerDate=4/20/2015

Richard Lazarus, Howard and Katherine Aibel Professor of Law, Harvard University
What happens when laws and regulations don’t keep pace with changes in technology, science, and society? The answer, according to Harvard Law School Professor Richard Lazarus, is lawlessness. Come learn some of the history and circumstances behind the country’s current but outdated environmental laws, how the original scope and intentions of these laws may no longer match the scope of the problems we face today, and the lawmaking challenges we now face as we seek to address the mounting environmental risks posed by deepwater drilling, natural gas fracking, and climate change. Professor Lazarus, who teaches environmental law, natural resources law, Supreme Court advocacy, and torts at Harvard Law School, was the principal author of Deep Water–The Gulf Oil Disaster and the Future of Offshore Drilling (GPO 2011), the Report to the President of the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling Commission. He will speak of lessons learned from this environmental disaster and how new regulations in line with current technologies are needed to better protect the environment as we tap our natural resources.

-----------------------
Tuesday, April 21
-----------------------

MIT Earth Days
Tuesday, April 21
All day
http://mit.edu/earthday

Join us for a week-long celebration of our planet! This year, the theme is "little things add up". Together, we can take big steps towards a sustainable planet. This year, clubs and organizations across campus have come together for an action-packed week of events, including Environmental Film Festival; "Compost Collection in your Office/Lab" workshop; Choose to Reuse; Waste Research & Innovation Night; MIT Sustainability Summit; and W20 Public Waste Audit. 

Visit our website for a complete list of MIT Earth Days events: mit.edu/earthday
Don't miss an event! Subscribe to our MIT Earth Days Google Calendar: https://mitearthday.wordpress.com/calendar/

Web site: mit.edu/earthday
Open to: the general public
This event occurs daily through April 24, 2015.
Sponsor(s): GSC Meetings, MIT Office of Sustainability
For more information, contact:  GSC Sustainability
gsc-sustainability@mit.edu 

----------------------------

Classes of defense for computer systems
Tuesday, April 21
12:00 pm
Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, 23 Everett Street, Second Floor, Cambridge
RSVP required for those attending in person at https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/events/luncheon/2015/04/Wolff#RSVP
Event will be webcast live on https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/events/luncheon/2015/04/Wolff at 12:00 pm.

with Berkman Fellow, Josephine Wolff
There is no silver bullet for defending computer systems. Strengthening security means negotiating a balance among a variety of defenses that fall into several different categories and rely on the cooperation and support of many different actors, including technologists, managers, and policy-makers. Therefore, one crucial element of security involves understanding the multiplicity of defenses and the ways they can be combined and recombined to protect systems. Yet, there is no clear model of how different classes of computer system defense relate to classes of attack, or what defensive functions are best suited to technical, policy, or managerial interventions. Drawing on case studies of actual security incidents, as well as the past decade of security incident data at MIT, this talk will analyze security roles and defense design patterns for application designers, administrators, and policy-makers. It will also discuss the interplay between defenses designed to limit access to computer systems and those oriented towards limiting and mitigating the resulting damage.

About Josephine
Josephine is a PhD candidate in the Engineering Systems Division at MIT studying cybersecurity and Internet policy. Her dissertation research focuses on understanding combinations of different types of defenses for computer systems, including the interactions among technical, social, and policy mechanisms. She has interned with Microsoft's Technology Policy Group, the Center for Democracy & Technology, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, and the Department of Defense. She has also written on computer security topics for Slate, Scientific American, and Newsweek. She holds an AB in mathematics from Princeton University, and an SM in Technology & Policy from MIT.

-----------------------------------

Media & Politics: What's Next? A Conversation with the Shorenstein Fellows
WHEN  Tue., Apr. 21, 2015, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Kennedy School, Taubman Building, Room 275, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Humanities, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  William E. Buzenberg, former executive director of The Center for Public Integrity, has been researching journalistic collaboration in the digital age.
Jackie Calmes, national correspondent for The New York Times, has been researching partisan media.
Michele Norris, NPR host and special correspondent, has been leading study groups on race and cultural identity.
David Weinberger, senior researcher at Harvard’s Berkman Center, has been researching news media through the lens of open platforms.
Moderated by Alex S. Jones, director of the Shorenstein Center
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO tim_bailey@hks.harvard.edu
LINK http://shorensteincenter.org/media-politics-whats-next/

-----------------------------------

Wahhabism: From Provincial Heresy to Arabian Hegemony
WHEN  Tue., Apr. 21, 2015, 4 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS South Bldg, Belfer Case Study Room (S020), 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Religion, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR CMES Lecture Series on Arabian Peninsula Studies
SPEAKER(S)  David Commins, professor of history, Dickinson College
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO elizabethflanagan@fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Rescheduled from March 5.
This event is off the record. The use of recording devices is strictly prohibited.
LINK http://cmes.hmdc.harvard.edu/node/3833

-----------------------------------

Getting to Yes (or No): Making Ballot Initiatives More Voter-Friendly and Deliberative
WHEN  Tue., Apr. 21, 2015, 4:10 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, 124 Mt. Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Humanities, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation
SPEAKER(S)  John Gastil, professor and head, Department of Communication Arts and Sciences, Penn State University
Jon Hecht, MA State Representative (D-Watertown)
Tyrone Reitman, Executive Director, Healthy Democracy Oregon
Carmen Sirianni (moderator), Morris Hillquit Professor of Labor and Social Thought, Brandeis University
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS  Join academics and practitioners in a panel discussion on the Citizens’ Initiative Review, an innovative approach to direct democracy through ballot initiatives.
More than 70% of the people in the US live in a state or city where direct democracy is available. In 2014, Americans in 42 states voted on altogether 158 ballot measures. Topics featured in these ballots included burning questions such as the minimum wage, criminal justice, guns, immigration and insurance. As an effect of citizens’ participation in these ballots, four states for example raised the minimum wages from the beginning of this year. Europe, on the other hand, awaited for the result of the Scottish independence referendum with fear and excitement in 2014. However, the complexity of current policy issues and investments of large interest organizations in referendum campaigns have raised concerns about the functioning of direct democracy.
In Oregon, the state legislature together with a civil society organization Healthy Democracy Oregon have come up with a new type of ballot process – one that aims to overcome the challenges of voters’ ignorance and the polarization of discourse in referendum campaigns. The Citizens’ Initiative Review (CIR) combines a deliberative citizens’ assembly to a direct citizens’ initiative and ballot vote. This panel discussion will explore ways to reform direct democracy using the CIR as an example. After presenting the experiences and preliminary research findings of Oregon case, panelists will discuss how direct democratic institutions, referendum campaigns and voter competence could be improved today in the U.S. and abroad.
LINK http://ash.harvard.edu/event/getting-to-yes-or-no-making-ballot-initiatives-more-voter-friendly-and-deliberative

-----------------------------------

Aging Successfully
Tuesday, April 21
4:30p–6:30p
MIT, Wong Auditorium-E51, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Join a Cognitive Neuroscientist, and the Directors of MIT's Media Lab and Dalai Lama Center to learn how Mindfulness Meditation can change our brains and enhance our lives. This ancient tradition has gained popularity in supporting creativity, focus and ethics at high tech companies and even MIT's own Media Lab. Drawing from current neuroscience research and Buddhist contemplative practices, the program will highlight new ways mindfulness practices are being used to support creativity, concentration, and well being as well as healthy aging.

Moderator
Maryanne Kirkbride, Clinical Director for Campus Life and leader of Community Wellness at MIT Medical, will outline the topic and facilitate both the panel discussion and audience questions.

Panelists
David Vago, PhD, Neuroscientist at Brigham and Women's Functional Neuroimaging Laboratory and instructor at Harvard Medical School, will share his research on the basic neuroscientific mechanisms by which mindfulness-based practices function.
Joichi "Joi" Ito, Director of MIT's Media Lab, will discuss the contribution that awareness and focus bring to creativity and innovation.
The Venerable Tenzin Priyadarshi, Founding Director of MIT's Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values, will take the audience through a guided mindfulness meditation.

A question and answer period will follow the presentations.

Web site: http://web.mit.edu/womensleague/pdf/Stratton-Aging-2015.pdf
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): MIT Women's League
For more information, contact:  Sis de Bordenave
617-253-3656
wleague@mit.edu 

-----------------------------------

The Smartest Targets for the World
Tuesday, April 21
5:00PM - 6:15PM
Geological Lecture Hall (Room 100), Harvard Geological Museum, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Presented by Dr. Bjorn Lomborg, one of TIME Magazine's 100 most influential people
The UN, with its 2015-2030 process, is going to set the global goals for the next 15 years in September, following the success of the Millennium Development Goals. Since these could end up determining a large part of the period's $2.5 trillion development aid, it is important we pick targets more effectively.

The Post-2015 Consensus is a project to determine which targets will deliver the most good per dollar spent. Dr. Lomborg's team has commissioned in-depth research and cost-benefit analyses on 22 diverse topics of development, ranging from education to gender and energy. Sixty teams of internationally renowned economists, including several Nobel Laureates, are taking into account not just the economic, but also health, social and environmental benefits to the world.

Dr. Bjorn Lomborg researches the smartest ways to improve the environment and the world. His top-ranked think tank works with over 100 economists including 7 Nobel Laureates. He is one of TIME Magazine's 100 most influential people in the world, one of the 75 most influential people of the 21st century according to Esquire magazine, and one of the 50 people who could save the planet according to the UK Guardian. Lomborg has repeatedly been named one of Foreign Policy's Top 100 Global Thinkers.

Hosted by:
Consortium for Energy Policy Research at Harvard
Harvard Environmental Economics Program
Harvard University Center for the Environment

Contact Name:   Bryan Galcik
Bryan_Galcik@harvard.edu

-----------------------------------

Manufacturing Across Scales:  Carbon Nanotube Sensors
Tuesday, April 2
6PM - 8PM
swissnex Boston, 420 Broadway, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/manufacturing-across-scales-carbon-nanotube-sensors-with-prof-dr-ing-christofer-hierold-of-ethz-tickets-16518198376

Prof. Dr. Ing. Christofer Heirold, ETH Zurich
On Tuesday, April 21, swissnex Boston will host a talk by Prof. Dr. Christofer Hierold of the Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETHZ). 

It is our pleasure to invite you to attend both Prof. Dr. Hierold's talk titled, "Manufacturing Across Scales - Carbon Nanotube Sensors", as well as the networking reception that will follow.

“Manufacturing Across Scales” is a strategic initiative of ETH Zurich, the ETH Zurich Foundation and the Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering. It focuses on fundamental and engineering research for the foundation of new technologies, fabrication processes and products for a mid to long-term technology transfer option. Engineering research is needed, to establish a sound knowledge base for manufacturing processes, to make them predictable and thus controllable.
The Details

Prof. Dr. Ing. Christofer Heirold 
Prof. Dr. Christofer Hierold has been Professor of Micro and Nanosystems at ETH Zurich since April 2002. He was Head and Deputy Head of the Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering from 2009 until 2011, and from 2011 until 2014, respectively. Further he has been appointed Executive Coordinator ETH Zurich of the Binnig and Rohrer Nanotechnology Center (BRNC) at Rüschlikon. Before he joined ETH Zurich in 2002 he was with Siemens AG, Corporate Research, and Infineon Technologies AG in Germany. At ETH Zurich his research is focused on the evaluation of new materials for MEMS, on advanced microsystems, and on carbon nanotubes for sensors. Christofer Hierold is Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems. He is member of the Swiss Academy of Engineering Sciences (SATW).

-----------------------------------

Boston Quantified Self Show&Tell #BQS19 (NERD)
Tuesday, April 21
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Microsoft NERD New England Research & Development Center, One Memorial Drive, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.meetup.com/BostonQS/events/220016995/

Sign in at the front desk and then take the elevators to the 1st floor.
Price: $7.00/per person

Please come join us on Tuesday, April 21st for another fun night of self-tracking presentations, sharing ideas, and showing tools. If you are self-tracking in any way -- health stats, biofeedback, life-logging, mood monitoring, biometrics, athletics, etc. -- come and share your methods, results and insights.

We're happy to hosted by our friends at Microsoft. Be sure to RSVP early to grab your spot! Come to meet new people, check out new hands-on gadgets and tools, enjoy healthy food, and learn from personal stories.

QS Boston is dedicated to hosting events that are safe and comfortable for everyone. All QS Boston events will follow the QS Boston Code of Conduct. Questions/feedback can be sent to Maggie (maggie.delano@gmail.com).

6:00 - 7:00 pm DEMO HOUR & SOCIAL TIME
Are you a toolmaker? Come demo your self-tracking gadget, app, project or idea that you're working on and share with others in our "science fair for adults." If you are making something useful for self-trackers – software, hardware, web services, or data standards – please demo it in this workshop portion of the Show&Tell. Want to participate in Demo Hour? Please let us know when you RSVP or contact Michael at myams@me.com for a spot.

7:00 - 8:00 pm IGNITE SHOW&TELLS
If you'd like to talk about your personal self-tracking story, please let us know in your RSVP or contact Maggie at maggie.delano@gmail.com, so you can discuss your topic. In your talk, you should answer the three prime questions: What did you do? How did you do it? What did you learn?

If you've never been to a meetup before, you can get a sense of what the talks are like from watching videos of previous QS talks.

Don't know what Ignite means? Click here for more info and here for tips on how to deliver a fantastic quick-fire presentation.

8:00 - 9:00 pm MORE SOCIAL TIME & NETWORKING
Talk to the speakers, chat with new and old friends, ask other people what they're tracking, and generally hang out and have a great time.

---------------------------------

Boston New Technology April 2015 Product Showcase #BNT52
Tuesday, April 21
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology, 41 Berkeley Street, Boston
Enter at the Berkeley St Entrance, look for BNT signs and come to our check-in table to print your name tag. Showcase will take place in the auditorium off the lobby.
RSVP at http://www.meetup.com/Boston_New_Technology/events/220504973/

Free event! Come learn about 7 innovative and exciting technology products and network with the Boston/Cambridge startup community! Each presenter gets 5 minutes for product demonstration and 5 minutes for Questions & Answers. And yes, we will have chairs! Please follow @BostonNewTech and use the #BNT52 hashtag in social media posts: details here.

----------------------

CafeSci Boston: "Why 60 Minutes? 5000 Years of Tradition and Science"
Tuesday, April 21
7:00pm - 8:00pm
Le Laboratoire Cambridge, 650 East Kendall St. Cambridge

Join WGBH's NOVA at our monthly event, CafeSci Boston. Science Cafes are live and lively events that bring scientists, researchers, artists, and professionals out to have a conversation about their work with the general public. This month, Robert Coolman will discuss why mechanical clocks were incapable of measuring minutes and seconds until the 16th century, yet the 60 used then is the same used by the Sumerians over 5000 years ago. This will be the story of how 60 was handed from civilization to civilization.

http://www.cambridgesciencefestival.org/2015Festival/2015ScheduleOfEvents.aspx

---------------------------
Wednesday, April 22
---------------------------

HLS Earth Day Celebration
Wednesday, April 22
11:30AM - 1:30PM
Harvard Law School, 1563-1585 Massachusetts Avenue, HLS WCC Plaza, Cambridge

Join the Office for Sustainability, HLS Green Team staff, and Green Living Reps for a celebration of Earth Day

Highlights:
Eco vendors
Artisans
Informational booths
Local products from community innovators
E-waste drop off (including batteries, cell phones, computers)
CSA farm share sign-up

Contact Name:  Diane Long
dlong@law.harvard.edu

---------------------------

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Earth and Lighting Fair
Wednesday, April 22
11:30 am–1:30 pm
Earth Fair: Kresge Auditorium, 677 Huntington Avenue, Cambridge
Lighting Fair: FXB Atrium, 651 Huntington Avenue, Cambridge

Local and sustainable food vendors and lab supply vendors will be available to showcase green practices, plus an EcoOp booth and LED lighting pre-orders (visit www.techniart.com/lma April 6-20).  Join us for raffles, prizes, food samples, and more!
---------------------------

Harvard Celebrates Earth Day
Wednesday, April 22
11:30 am–5 pm
Harvard, Science Center Plaza, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Join us we celebrate Earth Day, with booths from campus groups, local farmers, and the Cambridge Community. Learn about sustainability initiatives on campus and places to volunteer, listen to student performances, participate in a freecycle, play recycling-related lawn games, or get your bike tuned up!

Sponsored by the Office for Sustainability, Harvard University Dining Services, and Harvard's Common Spaces.

-------------------------------

Libraries as a Platform: Enabling libraries to become community centers of meaning
Wednesday, April 22
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building E25-202, 45 Carleton Street, Cambridge

Speaker: David Weinberger, Harvard University
Libraries are in a unique position to reflect a community back to itself, enabling us to see what matters, and to use that information so that the community learns from itself. This is one of the primary use cases for developing and widely deploying library platforms. But becoming a community center of meaning can easily turn into creating an echo chamber. The key is developing interoperable systems that let communities learn from one another. We'll look at one proposal for a relatively straightforward way of doing so that's so dumb that it just might work.

Discussant: David Weinberger has worked in high tech for decades and writes about the effect of the Internet on how we think about ourselves, our world, and business. He has served as co-director of the Harvard Library Innovation Lab and am is currently a Senior Researcher at Harvard's Berkman Center.

Information Science Brown Bag talks, hosted by the Program on Information Science, consists of regular discussions and brainstorming sessions on all aspects of information science and uses of information science and technology to assess and solve institutional, social and research problems. These are informal talks. Discussions are often inspired by real-world problems being faced by the lead discussant.

Web site: http://informatics.mit.edu/event/brown-bag-david-weinberger-harvard-university-libraries-platform-enabling-libraries
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): MIT Libraries
For more information, contact:  Chen, Andrew
6172533044
achen0@mit.edu

-------------------------------

Privacy: The Core Driving Feature of New Technology Services
WHEN  Wed., Apr. 22, 2015, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Law School, WCC 2012, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Business, Information Technology, Law, Lecture, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Presented by the Harvard Law School Journal of Law and Technology (JOLT)
SPEAKER(S)  Auren Hoffman is currently CEO of LiveRamp (acquired by Acxiom in July 2014).
LiveRamp’s goal is to connect data to every marketing application. Auren was a board member of BrightRoll (acquired by Yahoo in December 2014). He is also an angel investor in over 75 technology companies. He was formerly Chair of Stonebrick Group. Previously, he founded and sold three Internet companies before age 30: BridgePath (sold in 2002), Kyber Systems (sold in 1997), and GetRelevant (sold in 2002). Auren holds a B.S.E. in Industrial Engineering and Operations Research from UC Berkeley.
You can find Auren on Twitter @ twitter.com… and on Quora @ www.quora.com…
LiveRamp is @ 667 Mission Street, Fourth Floor, San Francisco, CA 94105 - auren@liveramp.com - aurenh@gmail.com
DETAILS  The next 10 years will see the rise of more companies like SnapChat and WhatsApp that specifically promote privacy. Rather than privacy being under attack by technology companies, it will be be the core driving feature of new services. Auren Hoffman would know: He is an angel investor in over 75 technology companies, and he founded and sold three of his own Internet companies before age 30. Join JOLT in welcoming Auren for a discussion about the commercial future of privacy.
Lunch and Coffee will be served.

-------------------------------

3D Printed Bionic Nanomaterials
Wednesday, April 22
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building 34-401, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Michael McAlpine, Princeton University
The ability to interweave biology with nanomaterials in 3D could enable the creation of bionic systems possessing unique properties and functionalities. The coupling of 3D printing with novel nanomaterials and living platforms may enable next-generation 3D printed bionic nanodevices. Interfacing these devices with biology could yield breakthroughs in regenerative medicine, smart prosthetics, and human-machine interfaces.

MTL Seminar Series
Light lunch at 11:30am

Web site: http://www.mtl.mit.edu/seminars/spring2015.html
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Microsystems Technology Laboratories
For more information, contact:  Valerie DiNardo
253-9328
valeried@mit.edu

-------------------------------

The Chinese Dream of Great Renewal: Challenges for China and the World
WHEN  Wed., Apr. 22, 2015, 12:30 – 1:50 p.m.
WHERE Harvard, CGIS South, S020, Japan Friends of Harvard Concourse, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Humanities, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Critical Issues Confronting China Seminar Series; co-sponsored by the Harvard Asia Center and the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies
SPEAKER(S)  The Honorable Börje Ljunggren, former Swedish ambassador to the People's Republic of China and Vietnam

-------------------------------

Earth Day at Fresh Pond: Think Globally - Lend a Hand Locally!
Wednesday, April 22
1:30 - 3pm
Sprout the City Spring: Throw Seeds!
RSVP by April 20 with Kirsten at klindquist@cambridgema.gov, (617) 349-6489
Meet at the Ranger Station, 250 Fresh Pond Parkway, Cambridge
6-7:30pm
Garlic Mustard Muster 
Meet at Maher Park, 650 Concord Avenue, Cambridge

Sprout the City Spring: Throw Seeds!
Go guerilla in a good way: help sprout wildflowers all over Cambridge with “seed-bombs”! Native wildflower species are not only beautiful, they also provide nectar and seed for wildlife and reduce erosion. Join us in making “seed bombs” out of compost, clay and seeds to toss around town! Register by April 20th with Kirsten at klindquist@cambridgema.gov, (617) 349-6489.

Garlic Mustard Muster
We’ll tackle invasive, non-native garlic mustard to free up our woodland for native species like wild violet. No experience necessary! All tools are provided; long sleeves, pants and a water bottle are recommended. Latecomers are welcome; you’ll find us weeding near Black’s Nook. Contact: Kirsten at klindquist@cambridgema.gov, (617) 349-6489.  Groups: please contact Kirsten in advance.

-------------------------------

CIC Technology Showcase
Wednesday, April 22
4:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Cambridge Innovation Center, Venture Cafe (5th floor), 1 Broadway, Cambridge

CIC Cambridge houses over 700 startups under one roof in Kendall Square. Some amazing products such as the Android operating system, the Kindle Fire 2, and the Second Life virtual world have been developed here.  Join us April 22nd to see some of the coolest devices and applications being conjured up right here in Cambridge. This event is open to the public and co-hosted with the Cambridge Science Festival.

http://www.cambridgesciencefestival.org/

-------------------------------

Adopting a Cleaner Technology: The Effect of Driving Restrictions on Fleet Turnover
Wednesday, April 22
4:10-5:30
Harvard, Room L-382 (3rd Floor Littauer Building), 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Juan-Pablo Montero, Catholic University of Chile

Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy

--------------------------------

Housing Dynamics and Displacement in Cambridge
Wednesday, April 22
5:00p–7:00p
MIT, Building 9-450A, 105 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

The panel, moderated by MIT Department of Urban Studies and Planning Professor Balakrishnan Rajagopal, will explore issues of housing, gentrification, and displacement in Cambridge. Members of the Cambridge Residents Alliance (CRA) will present their experiences and findings on evolving housing dynamics as Cambridge undergoes redevelopment on and around its university campuses and across its neighborhoods.

The panel will also feature housing rights activists working in the Greater Boston area to discuss the effects they see in their neighborhoods and at the metropolitan scale. The event aims to make space for dialogue about both the larger political-economic forces shaping the present and future of housing in Cambridge, as well as MIT's role and responsibilities around these issues.

PANEL OF SPEAKERS:
LEE FARRIS, Chair, Cambridge Residents Alliance; Former Leader, Area 4/Port Coalition: JONATHAN KING, Professor, Department of Biology, MIT; KAREN NAREFSKY, Community Organizer, Somerville Community Corporation; KATHY WATKINS, Member, Alliance for Cambridge Tenants

Web site: radius.mit.edu
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): The Technology and Culture Forum at MIT, MIT Displacement Research and Action Network (DRAN)
For more information, contact:  Patricia-Maria Weinmann
617-253-0108
weinmann@mit.edu 

--------------------------------

Sustainability unConference 2015
Wednesday, April 22
5:30 PM to 10:00 PM (EDT)
District Hall 75 Northern Avenue, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/sustainability-unconference-2015-tickets-15880959377

Got Earth Day plans? Bring them to District Hall and be apart of the third annual Sustainability unConferenceon on Wednesday evening, April 22nd, from 5-10PM. EcoMotion, Impact Hub Boston, Greenovate Boston, District Hall, City Awake, and many others are providing a platform for diverse sectors to riff off one another and collaborate on the intersections of sustainability and innovation. We would love to engage you/your organization as a partner. The event is free to the public and will reflect the unique attendees who join the conversation.

What is an unConference? An unConference is an interactive event where participants propose topics and shape the agenda. There will be several planned exhibitors and thematic spaces, but the rest is up to you! Out-of-the-box ideas, idea paint walls, creative formatting, and props are encouraged. Proposed sessions will range from Sustainability in our Schools to Food Entrepreneurship, Cleantech and Eco-Districts to Beekeeping in the City, Women in Sustainability, Green Financing and many more!

If you are interested in hosting a session, you can propose your idea form by April 20th here.

Questions? Contact Sierra (sflanigan@ecomotion.us) or Helen (hfpetty@gmail.com). Looking forward to collaborating with you!

Session Proposals must be posted by 5:30pm. It is the responsibility of session leaders to ensure session title and description is posted on voting wall. Voting for session topics runs from 5:30pm to 6:00pm in the Assembly room.
Session locations will be finalized at 6:15pm.

5:00: Doors open for networking reception
5:30-6: Session voting, networking, and presentation tables
6: Welcoming address
6:30-7:30: Session Wave 1
8-9: Session Wave 2
9-10: Closing and Mingling

-----------------------------

Boston Living with Water Competition Pin-up
Wednesday, April 22
6:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
BSA Space, 290 Congress Street, #200, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-living-with-water-competition-pin-up-tickets-16433473963

Join us on Earth Day (April 22nd) from 6:00 to 8:30 PM at BSA Space for pin-up event involving all Boston Living with Water competition semi-finalists.

This is a valuable opportunity for teams to present their draft proposals for discussion and feedback from their peers, community members and other experts. Each team has 15 minutes to present their draft work before hearing back from participants.  Teams within each site will hear all three proposals presented and commented on.  They will then have another month to revise and finalize their submissions.

Space is limited, so please only RSVP if you plan to join us and participate in the discussion. We encourage team members from one site to spread out and participate in other site reviews as well. We look forward to seeing you there!

-----------------------------

A National Policy for Food Health and Wellbeing in a Changing Climate
Wednesday, April 22
6:30–7:30 pm
Harvard, Harvard Hall 201, Harvard Yard, Cambridge

Join the Harvard Food Literacy Project for a talk with Ricardo Salvador, Director, Food & Environment Program, Union of Concerned Scientists.

Policies are expressions of social, economic and political values and objectives. The increasing untenability of our dominant agricultural and food system, as attested by noxious impacts on the environment and public health, should spur policy innovations toward a more sustainable society. Environmental sustainability is inseparable from socioeconomic justice. A new vision for our agriculture and food system, informed by scientific understanding of how the planet works and a commitment to social equity, can shape a different and brighter reality for the 21st century. 

-----------------------------

The Health of Democracy: Polarization and Ideologies
Wednesday, April 22
6:30pm
Cambridge Forum, 3 Church Street, Cambridge

Can a polarized public maintain a healthy democracy? It;s not just the Congress that is ideologically divided.? The Pew Research Center recently documented how the American people have become polarized over the past 50 years. Michael Dimock, President of the Pew Research Center, discusses this ground-breaking study and its implications for the health of our democracy. What can citizens do to create and support effective community dialogues aimed at strengthening social bonds?

This program is funded in part by a grant from MassHumanities.

617-495-2727
www.cambridgeforum.org

-----------------------------

Solving for X: Preparing Our Children for an Uncertain World
Wednesday, April 22
6:30p–8:00p
MIT, Building 4-270, 182 Memorial Drive (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: John Hunter, Scot Osterweil, Peter Stidwill, Tenzin Priyadarshi
John Hunter, master teacher and creator of the World Peace Game, will share the subtle mechanics of his geo-political simulation, how it has for 35 years proved to be a successful interdisciplinary classroom tool, and why now his work has been hailed as a tool for peace by institutions ranging from the US Pentagon to the United Nations.

His heart-felt message of hope has evolved from a regular, introspective and intensive practice of engaging his students in the chaos and uncertainty of life through transformative experiences of give and take, and the innovative and critical thinking demanded of the impossible goals of his "game" the welfare of all nations and practical solutions to global crisis.

Hunter hopes to inspire others with the stories of immense compassion, courage, and optimism that have sprung from the collective wisdom of the children, our best hopes for peace tomorrow.

Web site: http://thecenter.mit.edu/cent_events/solving-x/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values
For more information, contact:  The Center at MIT
617 254-6030
DalaiLamaCenter@mit.edu

-----------------------------

Cambridge Science Festival Panel: Restoring Ecosystems to Reverse Global Warming
Wednesday, April 22
6:30 PM to 8:00 PM
Cambridge Public Library, Lecture Hall, 449 Broadway, Cambridge

Human impact has “broken” some ecosystems on the planet and significantly compromised most others. Is it possible restoring ecological health to impacted areas could address the worst threat yet faced by human civilization: the climate crisis?

Vast amounts of atmospheric carbon dioxide can be returned to soil through innovative land management practices. Benefits include greater agricultural productivity, improved nutrition, enhanced drought resilience, and the return of water to dried-up rivers and lakes.

This panel discussion, a free Cambridge Science Festival event, will focus on the latest science and field trials indicating that significant carbon drawdown is not only possible, it's essential.

Presented by Biodiversity for a Livable Climate, a 501c3 nonprofit based in Lexington, MA
http://bio4climate.org

--------------------------------

The Health of Democracy: A Polarized Public
WHEN  Wed., Apr. 22, 2015, 7 – 8:30 p.m.
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Humanities, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Cambridge Forum
SPEAKER(S)  Michael Dimock, president, Pew Research Center
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO 617-495-2727
director@cambridgeforum.org
DETAILS  Can a polarized public maintain a healthy democracy? It’s not just the Congress that is ideologically divided. The Pew Research Center recently documented how the American people have become polarized over the past 50 years. Michael Dimock, president of the Pew Research Center, discusses this ground-breaking study and its implications for the health of our democracy. What can citizens do to create and support effective community dialogues aimed at strengthening social bonds?
LINK www.cambridgeforum.org

------------------------
Thursday, April 23
------------------------

Art Technology Psyche
WHEN  Thu., Apr. 23, 2015, 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard University Arts @ 29 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Art/Design, Conferences, Humanities, Information Technology, Music, Opera
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR DARTH Crimson, Harvard Library, Digital Futures, Arts @ 29 Garden
SPEAKER(S)  Tod Machover, Brian Knep, Hans Tutschku, Kathy King, Leire Asensio-Villoria, Jake Rudin, Kythe Heller, Mary Hale, James Yamada, Panagiotis Michalatos, and more!
COST  Free and open to the public; RSVP required
TICKET WEB LINK  www.arttechnologypsyche.com
CONTACT INFO christopher_morse@harvard.edu
LINK www.arttechnologypsyche.com

------------------------------

A Critical Comparison of Regulatory Regimes for Offshore Oil and Gas in the U.S., U.K, and Norway
Thursday, April 23
11:45-1
Harvard, Bell Hall (5th Floor Belfer Building), 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Lori Bennear, Associate Professor of Environmental Economics and Policy, Duke University

Regulatory Policy Program Seminar

--------------------------------

New England Groundfish: A Story About Managing People
Thursday, April 23
12:00-1:00pm
Tufts, Lincoln Filene Center, Rabb Room, 10 Upper Campus Road, Medford

Brett Alger, Fishery Management Specialist, NOAA Fisheries
New England fisheries date back several centuries, with the iconic Atlantic cod playing a key role in our countries' development. In the 1970's, faced with declining fish stocks, Congress passed the Magnuson-Stevens Act to create sustainable fisheries that benefit our fishermen and our Nation. The Act created eight Fishery Management Councils made up of fishermen, along with state and federal managers to develop measures to manage fisheries within the legal requirements. The New England Council is responsible for developing a management plan for 13 groundfish species, including cod. The fishery is managed using a variety of tools, including catch limits, effort controls, and a catch share system. Despite being one of the most scrutinized and highly regulated fisheries in the world, several groundfish stocks including cod, are in extremely poor condition. A concoction of political, environmental, economic, and scientific factors has left cod and the fishing industry in peril, and fisheries management with few options. Brett's presentation will cover the legal, scientific, and management process of New England groundfish, and highlight what has happened with Atlantic cod, and where the fishery might be headed.

Brett Alger is a Fishery Management Specialist for NOAA Fisheries in the Greater Atlantic Regional Fisheries Office in Gloucester, MA, a region that extends from the Canadian border to North Carolina. He helps to manage commercial and recreational fisheries in Federal waters of the Atlantic Ocean, including developing policy, implementing management measures, and monitoring catch. Before coming to NOAA Fisheries six years ago, Brett earned a B.S. in Biology from Central Michigan University, an M.S in Fisheries Management and Science from Michigan State University, and worked for the United States Fish and Wildlife Service and several State agencies in the Midwest.

-----------------------------

Managing Water in the West: the US Government's Role as the Largest Supplier of Fresh Water in the United States
Thursday, April 23
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building E51-149, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Camille Calimlim Touton, Counselor to the Assistant Secretary for Water and Science at the United States Department of the Interior
Camille Calimlim Touton joins the MIT Water Club to discuss the institutional, technical, and political challenges faced by the US Department of the Interior as the largest supplier of freshwater in the nation. As Counselor to the Assistant Secretary for Water and Science, she works with Interior's two bureaus most active in water resources management: the Bureau of Reclamation and the US Geological Survey. Camille will outline the Department???s complex relationships with tribal nations, state and local municipalities, and other regional interests. Camille will also brief MIT scholars on new initiatives promoted by the Department, including the new Open Water Data Initiative.

Web site: http://waterclub.scripts.mit.edu/wp/events/event/managing-water-in-the-west/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): MIT Water Club, Graduate Student Council
For more information, contact:  Neha Mehta
waterclub-officers@mit.edu
-----------------------------

How Interfaces Demand Obedience
Thursday, April 23
12:00pm to 1:30pm
MIT Media Lab, 3rd floor, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://civic.mit.edu/event/civic-media-lunch-mushon-zer-aviv-how-interfaces-demand-obedience

Mushon Zer-Aviv
The internet, once associated with openness and decentralization, is increasingly understood in terms of the control exerted by government agencies (like the NSA) and advertising (targeted ads). What is less commonly discussed is how this subliminal control is embedded in interface design. In this talk Mushon Zer-Aviv argues that web interfaces demand our silent obedience with every page load and he tries to offer tactics and strategies for challenging the politics of the interface.

Zer-Aviv is a designer, an educator and a media activist based in Tel Aviv. His work and writing explore the boundaries of interface and the biases of techno-culture as they are redrawn through politics, design and networks. Among Mushon’s collaborations, he is the co-founder of Shual.com – a foxy design studio; YouAreNotHere.org – a tour of Gaza through the streets of Tel Aviv; Kriegspiel – a computer game version of the Situationist Game of War; the Turing Normalizing Machine – exploring algorithmic prejudice; the AdNauseam extension – clicking ads so you don’t have to; and multiple government transparency and civic participation initiatives with the Public Knowledge Workshop; Mushon also designed the map for Waze.com. Mushon is an alumni of Eyebeam – an art and technology center in New York. He teaches digital media as a senior faculty member at Shenkar School of Engineering and Design. Previously he taught new media research at NYU and Open Source design at Parsons the New School of Design and in Bezalel Academy of Art & Design. Read him at Mushon.com and follow him at @mushon.

-----------------------------

Are You Certain? Leaders, Misplaced Certainty, and War in U.S. Foreign Policy
WHEN  Thu., Apr. 23, 2015, 12:15 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, HKS,  Belfer Center Library, Littauer-369, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR International Security Program
SPEAKER(S)  Robert Schub, research fellow, International Security Program
CONTACT INFO susan_lynch@harvard.edu
LINK http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/events/6626/are_you_certain_leaders_misplaced_certainty_and_war_in_us_foreign_policy.html

-----------------------------

New Perspectives on Large-Scale Systems Change
WHEN  Thu., Apr. 23, 2015, 12:15 – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Law Schoo, Wasserstein Hall B010 (Basement level), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Humanities, Law, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR The Program on Negotiation
SPEAKER(S)  Joel Cutcher-Gershenfeld, professor and former dean in the School of Labor and Employment Relations (LER) at the University of Illinois, United States
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO Polly Hamlen, mhamlen@law.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Broad societal challenges, such as global climate change, industrial revitalization, and personalized medicine depend on effective models for large-scale systems change. This seminar will feature two powerful lenses into these large-scale challenges – a focus on deeply embedded operating assumptions and a focus on system-level stakeholder alignment. 

-----------------------------

The Benefits of Biomass Combined Heat and Power
Thursday, April 23
2 p.m. Eastern
webinar
RSVP at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3533308468996012289?utm_source=SCN+InBox+e-Newsletter&utm_campaign=a1c67323e1-HurstInvite_4-2-15&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_11e7ac761c-a1c67323e1-188562049

featuring Sullivan County's Combined Heat & Power System
In December, 2013, Sullivan County New Hampshire flipped the switch on a new $3.4 million biomass Combined Heat and Power (CHP) district energy system to serve its 166-bed nursing home and 168-bed prison complex, as well as two smaller on-site buildings in Unity, N.H.

The system is almost entirely fueled by locally sourced, renewable wood chips and produces inexpensive heat and electricity for the more than 215,000 sq. ft. of conditioned space. The system has replaced 95 percent of fuel oil purchases and 10 percent of electric purchases in the nursing home.

The county estimates the annual fuel savings will pay for the construction bond within 15 years.

In this free, one-hour webinar, Sullivan County Facilities Director John Cressy will explain how the project was conceived and implemented, and how it has performed in its first full year of operation. He'll be joined by Bob Waller of Thermal Systems, Inc., who managed all specification and procurement services for the project.

Sustainable City Network operates a website (http://www.sCityNetwork.com), customized e-newsletters and interactive tools dedicated to providing quality and timely information on sustainability products, services and best practices to leaders in government, education and healthcare.

-----------------------------

A STEAM Conversation: Learning through the Lens of Art & Science
Thursday, April 23
3:00pm - 4:30pm
Lesley University College of Art and Design, Lower Arts Commons in Lunder Art Center, 1801 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

This 2nd annual STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, Math) Conversation, a collaboration between Catalyst Conversation (CC) and the Cambridge Creativity Commons (CCC) is a lecture and workshop that explores the fertile overlap between the arts and sciences and how teaching them together can promote excitement and engagement in learning. A local artist and scientist will give presentations on a common theme followed by a hands-on workshop with ideas on how to merge science and arts education. We welcome educators, youth, artists, scientists and those interested in this rich ground for learning!

http://www.cambridgesciencefestival.org/2015Festival/2015ScheduleOfEvents.aspx

-----------------------------

 "It Takes MOXIE to Send People to Mars"
Thursday, April 23
3:30p
BU, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Room 502, Boston

Michael Hecht

-------------------------------

An Atmospheric Measurement Network and Modeling Framework to Quantify Methane Emissions from Natural Gas Losses in the Boston Urban Region
Thursday, April 23
4:00p–5:00p
MIT, Building 48-316, 15 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Dr. Kathryn McKain, Harvard University

Environmental Sciences Seminar Series
Join us for a weekly series of EFM/Hydrology topics by MIT faculty and students, as well as guest lecturers from around the globe.

Web site: https://sites.google.com/site/parsonsseminars/home
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Parsons Lab, Civil and Environmental Engineering
For more information, contact:  Brenda Pepe
617-258-5554
pepebe@mit.edu

-----------------------------

What Went Wrong?: The Causes of Democratic Breakdown in Egypt
WHEN  Thu., Apr. 23, 2015, 4 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS, Knafel 262, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR The Middle East Seminar, co-chairs: Herbert C. Kelman, Lenore G. Martin, Sara Roy; sponsored by the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies.
SPEAKER(S)  Carrie R. Wickham, professor, Department of Political Science, Emory University
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO sroy@fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  This event is off the record. The use of recording devices is strictly prohibited.
LINK http://cmes.hmdc.harvard.edu/node/3822

-----------------------------

Making Education Relevant in the Face of Global Challenges
WHEN  Thu., Apr. 23, 2015, 4 – 6:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT Discussion, Forum, Lecture, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Alumni, AskWith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT EMAIL  askwith_forums@gse.harvard.edu
CONTACT PHONE  617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED  No
ADMISSION FEE This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Education
DETAILS  Moderator: Fernando Reimers, Ed.M.’84, Ed.D.’88, Ford Foundation Professor of Practice in International Education and Faculty Director, International Education Policy Program, HGSE
Panelists:
William Clark, Harvey Brooks Professor of International Science, Public Policy and Human Development and Faculty Chair, Energy and Natural Resources Program, Belfer Center for International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School
Diana Eck, Professor of Comparative Religion and Indian Studies and Fredric Wertham Professor of Law and Psychiatry in Society, Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences and Member of the Faculty of Divinity
Rosabeth Moss Kanter, Ernest L. Arbuckle Professor of Business Administration, Harvard Business School and Chair, Harvard Advanced Leadership Initiative
Howard Koh, Professor of the Practice of Public Health Leadership, Harvard School of Public Health and Co-Chair, Harvard Advanced Leadership Initiative
This panel opens a think tank focused on the question of how to make education relevant. How do we align what schools and universities teach w some of the biggest global challenges we face? the challenges of including all, of preventing and addressing the potential for religious, ethnic and racial conflict, the challenge of closing gender gaps, promoting health and fostering environmental sustainability.

-----------------------------

Investing in Lower Income Communities: A Continuing Conversation
WHEN  Thu., Apr. 23, 2015, 5 – 6:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Building, B-500, Bell Hal, l79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Education, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Joint Center for Housing Studies and Rappaport Institute for Greater Boston
SPEAKER(S)  Elizabeth B. Smith, Janelle Chan, Joe Flatley, Chrystal Kornegay, and Esther Schlorholtz
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS  Lower income communities face continuing challenges in attracting capital for housing and other types of investments. This panel discussion, with speakers representing key stakeholder groups, is aimed at furthering the conversation about the current investment needs facing lower income areas and how lending efforts can best be focused – viable strategies and new ideas. Although the focus will be on the Boston area, the issues discussed have broader relevance.
LINK http://www.jchs.harvard.edu/event/investing-lower-income-communities-continuing-conversation

-----------------------------

President’s Challenge Demo Day 2015
Thursday, April 23
5:00 PM to 7:00 PM (EDT)
Harvard innovation lab, 125 Western Avenue, Lobby Area, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/presidents-challenge-demo-day-2015-tickets-16384751232

We are pleased to invite you to the President’s Challenge Demo Day here at the i-lab. The President's Challenge encouraged students from across Harvard to apply their knowledge and come up with creative solutions to the world's most pressing problems. In March, ten finalist teams were announced and awarded a seed grant of $5,000 and support from the i-lab, which includes mentoring, workshops and workspace. At Demo Day these ten finalist teams will showcase their efforts and progress in making impact on the world around them.
We hope you can attend and meet the students to speak with them in person about their ideas and plans. 

-----------------------------

Fab Lab Hub Fundraiser
April 23
5:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Venture Cafe – Cambridge Innovation Center, 1 Broadway, 5th floor,  Cambridge

Fab Lab Hub is raising funds through C3 Community Member, SocialSeam, to outfit a group in Cambridge with 3D printers and materials to crowdsource prosthetic hands for kids and adults in need at zero cost. They’re hosting a campaign launch party on May 1 at Venture Café and you can get details at their table.

Website:   http://www.vencaf.org/calendar
-----------------------------

Islands: Natural Laboratories of Evolution
Thursday, April 23
6:00PM
Harvard Museum of Natural History, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Tahiti, Bermuda, Madeira, Bali. Everyone loves islands, but no one loves them more than an evolutionary biologist. From the dwarf elephants of Crete to the carnivorous caterpillars of Hawaii and the snaggly-fingered aye-aye of Madagascar, islands present a cornucopia of biodiversity. Darwin drew much of his inspiration from island stopovers on his fabled Beagle voyage, as did Alfred Russel Wallace on his own perambulations through the East Indies. Ever since Darwin and Wallace jointly proposed their theory of evolution by natural selection, biologists have returned to islands to gain fresh insights. In this illustrated, public lecture Jonathan Losos, Monique and Philip Lehner Professor for the Study of Latin America, Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Curator in Herpetology, Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, will discuss the relevance of islands to our understanding of evolution and its processes.

---------------------------

Thursday Evening Lecture Series: Global Health Includes US: Poverty, Race and Health in Mississippi
Thursday, April 23
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building 4-237, 182 Memorial Dr (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: H. Jack Geiger, City University of New York Medical School
The Global Health and Medical Humanities Initiative (GHMHI), with support from SHASS Anthropology, began hosting a Thursday Evening Lecture Series on campus on topics related to global and mental health during the fall 2014 semester. This talk featuring H. Jack Geiger is the fourth event in this lecture series. Dr. Geiger launched the Community Health Center Model in the United States, a network that now provides primary care for 28 million low-income patients, in 1965, with health centers in the Mississippi Delta and Boston. He is a founding member and past president of Physicians for Social Responsibility and Physicians for Human Rights, which shared in the Nobel Peace Prize in 1986 and 1988, respectively.

Appetizers and refreshments will be served. We hope you will be able to join us!

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Anthropology Program, Global Health and Medical Humanities Initiative
For more information, contact:  Brittany Peters

---------------------------

Google Wearables Challenge Final Smackdown
Thursday, April 23
6:00 PM to 9:30 PM
Google Cambridge, 355 Main Street, Cambridge
Reserve your tickets here: http://goo.gl/Hbj9D4

In our second iteration of this event following on the huge success of last year's "Google Glass Challenge", Google and Medstro widen the focus to include all wearable technology, regardless of manufacturer or OS. As of the submission deadline for the online portion of this year's challenge (March 14), we received 89 amazing submissions, surpassing last year by 34. During the voting period, which ends on March 28, you, the "crowd" will get to vote on your favorites along with a panel of expert judges. The top eight finalists will be invited to pitch their idea live at Google's Cambridge Center campus in Kendall Square on April 23. This event will also feature a "networking & demonstration" happy hour with hors d'oeuvres, beer and wine where you'll be able to try on the latest brain sensing headbands, myoelectric gesture sensing input devices, wearable body temperature trackers, fitness trackers plus some secret new stuff from Google!

---------------------------

A Conversation with Krzysztof Wodiczko
WHEN  Thu., Apr. 23, 2015, 6:30 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, Lecture Hall, 24 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Art/Design, Special Events
DETAILS  In association with John Harvard Projection Krzysztof Wodiczko will discuss his work followed by a conversation with James Voorhies, the John R. and Barbara Robison Family Director of the Carpenter Center, and Silvia Benedito, Assistant Professor in Landscape Architecture at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design.

---------------------------

Ford Hall Forum:  A Bumpy Ride
Thursday, April 23
6:30 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
C. Walsh Theatre, Suffolk University, 55 Temple Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/a-bumpy-ride-tickets-16223060611

Stephanie Pollack (Secretary, MassDOT)
Steve Regan (spokesman, MA Regional Taxi Advocacy Group)
Steve DelBianco (Executive Director, NetChoice)
Sabrina Maloney (driver, Lyft)
Uber and Lyft are warring with cab companies in every major city and the controversy is heating up in Boston. Are Lyft and Uber skirting regulations and is this related to the safety issues that have arisen with these services? Or are the taxi companies simply crying foul because their business model is outdated? In this conversation on a pivotal local issue, we talk about what’s fair to the companies when the rules of the road change, and what’s best for Bostonians on the move.

-------------------------

POVERTY, INC. - The Movie
Thursday, April 23
6:30 PM to 9:30 PM (EDT)
Harvard Graduate School of Education, 13 Appian Way, Larson 203, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/poverty-inc-harvard-school-of-education-tickets-16622000852

The Harvard School of Education proudly presents the award-winning documentary POVERTY, INC.
Watch the film trailer. Share with your friends on Twitter and Facebook.
This screening is free and open to the public. EventBrite RSVP required for admission.
Premiering at the Austin Film Festival last October, Poverty, Inc. has earned 27 international film festival honors and has been invited to numerous top universities. The film was recently picked up by the renowned distributor RoCo Films (16 Oscar-nominated documentaries in their portfolio), which has big plans for the film in the educational space and internationally.
FIGHTING POVERTY IS BIG BUSINESS. BUT WHO PROFITS THE MOST?
“I see multiple colonial governors,” says Ghanaian software entrepreneur Herman Chinery-Hesse of the international development establishment in Africa. “We are held captive by the donor community.”
The West has positioned itself as the protagonist of development, giving rise to a vast multi-billion dollar poverty industry — the business of doing good has never been better.
Yet the results have been mixed, in some cases even catastrophic, and leaders in the developing world are growing increasingly vocal in calling for change. Drawing from over 200 interviews filmed in 20 countries, Poverty, Inc. unearths an uncomfortable side of charity we can no longer ignore.
From TOMs Shoes to international adoptions, from solar panels to U.S. agricultural subsidies, the film challenges each of us to ask the tough question: Could I be part of the problem?

-------------------------

SciEx: Extreme Science Film Festival
Thursday, April 23
7:00p–9:00p
MIT, Building N51, MIT Museum, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Can a video about science be as exciting as an extreme sports video? It sure can, but you should be the judge! Join the student filmmakers who created cool video shorts, vote for your favorite original extreme science video, and see who will walk away with the grand prize! And, meet the season 3 hosts of Science Out Loud, the original web series written and hosted by MIT students. This season covers everything from the science of snot to regenerating lizard tails and human livers to making semiconductors!

Web site: http://sciex.mit.edu
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): SCIEX, MIT Museum
For more information, contact:  Josie Patterson
617-253-5927
museuminfo@mit.edu

--------------------
Friday, April 24
--------------------

Open Access, Copyright, and Academic Scholarship: Harvard and Beyond
WHEN  Thu., Apr. 23, 2015, 7:45 – 9:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Faculty Club, Room 10, 2nd floor, 20 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Health Sciences, Information Technology, Law, Lecture, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Harvard University Technology Assessment in Healthcare, Seminar Series
SPEAKER(S)  Kyle K. Courtney, copyright adviser, program manager, Office for Scholarly Communication, Harvard University Library
CONTACT INFO debra_milamed@hms.harvard.edu
617.327.5612
DETAILS  Breakfast served.

------------------------

MIT Sustainability Summit 2015 - Farming, Food, and the Future
Friday, April 24, 2015 at 8:00 AM - Saturday, April 25, 2015 at 4:00 PM
MIT, McDermott Court, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mit-sustainability-summit-2015-farming-food-and-the-future-tickets-15693724352
Cost:  $50-$150

Farming, Food, and the Future:  Changing the Shape of Agricultural Systems
Sponsored by Abdul Latif Jameel World Water and Food Security Lab and Pure Strategies
The 7th Annual MIT Sustainability Summit will focus on understanding—and offering solutions to—the complex problems facing local and global agriculture systems. This year’s Summit will tackle food and farming challenges through the lens of the “Circular Economy,” a systems-thinking approach that demonstrates that a flourishing, sustainable world is built on intentionally cycling resources between production and consumption: from farm to table and back again.
Speakers include:
Britt Lundgren ~ Director of Organic and Sustainable Agriculture, Stonyfield Farm
Fedele Bauccio ~ CEO, Bon Appetit Management Company and 2014 EY Entrepreneur of the Year
Kathleen Merrigan ~ Executive Director, George Washington Sustainability Institute and Former Undersecretary, US Department of Agriculture

Our full agenda will be announced shortly on the Sustainability Summit website at http://sustainabilitysummit.mit.edu

We encourage you to buy tickets early - we do have limited attendance capacity this year.

Interested in volunteering at the Summit? Please reach out to the Summit Operations Team.

We will not be able to refund tickets after purchase.

----------------------------

Architecture & CAST Symposium: Active Matter Summit, Programming Materials to Sense, Transform, and Self-Assemble
Friday, April 24
9:00a–6:00p

If today we program computers and machines, tomorrow we will program matter itself. This conference is about the emerging field of active matter and programmable materials that bridges the worlds of art, science, engineering and design, demonstrating new perspectives for computation, transformation and dynamic material applications. This two-day conference will consist of a range of talks and lively discussion from leading researchers in materials science, art & design, synthetic biology and soft-robotics along with leaders from government, public institutions and industry.

Conference is organized by Skylar Tibbits & Athina Papadopoulou, Self-Assembly Lab at MIT in collaboration with: the Center for Arts Science and Technology at MIT (CAST), the Department of Architecture at MIT, the International Design Center at MIT (IDC) & Autodesk Inc.

The Active Matter Summit is funded in part by the MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology (CAST) through the generosity of Ronald A. Kurtz '54, in recognition of the exemplary career of Merton C. Flemings, Toyota Professor Emeritus and founding director of the Materials Processing Center at MIT.

MIT Architecture Lecture Series

Web site: http://www.selfassemblylab.net
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
This event occurs daily through April 25, 2015.
Sponsor(s): Department of Architecture, Center for Art, Science & Technology, MIT-SUTD International Design Centre
For more information, contact:  Athina Papadopoulou
617-253-4412
athpap@mit.edu

---------------------------

Friday Morning Seminar: Epidemic Projections and the Politics of Reckoning During the Ebola Crisis
Friday, April 24
10:00a–11:50a
Harvard, 1550 William James Hall, 33 Kirkland Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Adia Benton, Brown University
The Friday Morning Seminar, as it is widely known, has been meeting every year since 1984, when it was launched as the foundational seminar for a postdoctoral fellowship program in culture, psychiatry, and mental health and the predoctoral program in medical anthropology. Since that time, the seminar has brought together an interdisciplinary group of social scientists and clinicians, including faculty, fellows, students, and visiting scholars from across the University and the teaching hospitals, and universities across greater Boston.

The seminar features presentations of new research and writing by faculty, fellows, and students, and by invited guests. Its perspective is global and international, with a focus on comparative and cross-cultural studies. Some seminars have led to edited books (recently, Postcolonial Disorders; Subjectivity: Ethnographic Investigations; and Shattering Culture), and special issues for journals such as Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry: An International Journal of Cross-Cultural Research.

The seminar will take place on Friday, 4/24/15, and will feature Adia Benton who will be giving a presentation entitled, Epidemic Projections and the Politics of Reckoning During the Ebola Crisis.

We hope you will be able to join us!

Open to: the general public

Sponsor(s): Global Health and Medical Humanities Initiative, Anthropology Program, Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Program in Medical Anthropology at Harvard University, Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard University

For more information, contact:
Brittany Peters
bapeters@mit.edu

-----------------------------

Spring Music Concert: Dance Music from Northeastern Brazil
WHEN  Fri., Apr. 24, 2015, 12 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Science Center Plaza, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Art/Design, Concerts, Dance, Exhibitions, Lecture, Music, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR This event is organized by ARTS @DRCLAS in collaboration with the Brazil Studies Program
SPEAKER(S)  Forró Zabumbeca
Paddy League, G3 in ethnomusicology, Harvard
Adam Bahrami, postdoctoral fellow in evolutionary biology, Harvard
Marié Abe, assistant professor of ethnomusicology, Boston University
Catherine Bent, instructor, Berklee College of Music
Kenny Kozol, performing arts coordinator, Brookline Public Schools
DETAILS
Program:
Talk: 12:00-12:10 p.m.
Dance lesson - 12:10 - 12:20 p.m.
Concert - 12:20 - 1:00 p.m.
LINK http://drclas.harvard.edu/event/artsdrclas-spring-music-concert15%27

---------------------------

E-Waste Regimes in China and Japan: "Scalvagers" and Environmental Justice
WHEN  Fri., Apr. 24, 2015, 12:15 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, S153, 1st Floor, CGIS South, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Environmental Sciences, Humanities, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Modern Asia Seminar Series, Harvard University Asia Center; co-sponsored by the Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies and the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies
SPEAKER(S)  Professor Anna Lora-Wainwright, associate professor in the human geography of China, University of Oxford

---------------------------

Data: A Love Story: How Data Science, and A Great Deal of Tinkering, Created the Biggest Dating Site in the U.S.
WHEN  Fri., Apr. 24, 2015, 12:30 – 2 p.m.
WHERE Harvard SEAS, Maxwell Dworkin Bldg. G115, 33 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Business, Information Technology, Lecture, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Institute for Applied Computational Science (IACS) at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
SPEAKER(S)  Christian Rudder, co-founder of OkCupid
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO 617.496.2623
nrbaker@seas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Lunch 12:30-1 p.m.; talk 1 p.m.
Second Annual Dean's Lecture on Computational Science and Engineering. Christian Rudder will discuss OkCupid's data-based social engineering and online experiments.
LINK http://www.seas.harvard.edu/calendar/event/82896

---------------------------

Innovations in Urban Design
Friday, April 24
1:00p–4:00p
MIT, Building N51, MIT Museum, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Learn about ways in which MIT researchers are using sustainable materials to create environmentally friendly buildings, discover innovation in architecture and design in the local community, and hear about changes in the Kendall Square and Central Square areas from historical and personal perspectives. Also, design and build your own green roof model!

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free with Museum admission
Tickets: MIT Museum
Sponsor(s): MIT Museum
For more information, contact:  Josie Patterson
617-253-5927
museuminfo@mit.edu
---------------------------

Lessons from Ferguson: Leadership in Times of Civil Unrest
Friday, April 24
4:00 PM to 6:00 PM (EDT)
Harvard Graduate School of Education, Longfellow Hall, Rm. 319, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/lessons-from-ferguson-leadership-in-times-of-civil-unrest-tickets-16622014894

Lessons from Ferguson: Leadership in Times of Civic Unrest
An interactive case study followed by interdisciplinary discussion
Join the Harvard Black Graduate Student Alliance (HBGSA) as we unite around and engage in academic discourse with Black students and professionals from across the University in understanding events like the non-indictments in Ferguson. By approaching the case through the work and interplay of multiple academic disciplines, the event will encourage greater dialogue among students from different areas of specialty and unify dialogue as we examine leadership in times of civic unrest in Ferguson. The event will take place in the form of an interactive case study moderated by Tracey Benson (EdLD '16) and Veronica Benavides (EdLD '16) followed by interdisciplinary discussion.
Friday, April 24
4 - 6 p.m.
Larsen 319 (Harvard Graduate School of Education)
*Dinner will be provided.
Schedule
4:00 - 4:10: Introduction
4:10 - 4:30: Reading of case
4:30 - 5:15: Moderated case discussion
5:15 - 5:20: Break to serve dinner
5:20 - 6:00  Interdisciplinary group and open discussion (over dinner)

---------------------------

How to become a Science YouTube Sensation: 3 million+ views and counting
Friday, April 24
4:30p–5:30p
MIT, Building 32-123, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Join the GSC Academics, Research, and Careers Committee for their largest and final event in the alternative careers series! Come hear from a panel of 3 Science communication YouTube stars:
Dianna Cowern, creator of Physics Girl
Michael Stevens, creator of Vsauce
Derek Muller, creator of Veritasium

All attendees will be entered in a raffle for an exclusive dinner with the panelists!
Space is limited, so sign up today at: http://tinyurl.com/mfxodco!

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): GSC Academics, Research, and Careers, Graduate Student Council
For more information, contact:  gsc-arc@mit.edu 

---------------------------

The State of Solar in Massachusetts
Friday, April 24
6:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
NonProfit Center, 89 South Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-state-of-solar-in-massachusetts-tickets-16299008774

The State of Solar:
A networking event and panel discussion for business leaders on solar power in Massachusetts
Over the past decade, Massachusetts has positioned itself as a solar leader in the United States. The state has 776 MW of installed solar capacity - ranking it 6th in the country - and is planning on reaching 1600 MW by 2020. 9,400 jobs have been created by the solar industry in Massachusetts, the 2nd largest solar industry employer in the country.
But the real question is: How will Massachusetts continue to regulate this market while also sustaining its growth?
Join Senator Jamie Eldridge as well as other forward-thinking legislators and industry leaders in a discussion on the future of the solar industry and the challenges that will need to be overcome to reach our solar goal.

Climate Action Business Association  http://cabaus.org

------------------------------

'Exploring Neurobiology and Music,' Presented by the Harvard Museum of Natural History
WHEN  Fri., Apr. 24, 2015, 7 – 8 p.m.
WHERE  Broad Institute, 415 Main Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Music, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Harvard Museum of Natural History, Harvard Museums of Science & Culture
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO hmnh@hmnh.harvard.edu, 617-495-3045
DETAILS  The Harvard Museums of Science & Culture present a special evening of music and science featuring Project LENS, a performance collaborative that seeks to reveal connections between music and a wide variety of topics as eclectic as evolution, 3D printing, humor, law, and birdsong. Join Project LENS members Ariel Mitnick, Rainer Crosett, and Alan Toda-Ambaras, along with neuroscientist David Silbersweig, to explore the field of neurobiology. Together they will present a TalkThread that reveals an idea, theory, or story; and a MusicThread spun of selections from the classical repertoire.
LINK http://hmnh.harvard.edu/event/exploring-neurobiology-and-music-1

-----------------------
Saturday, April 25
-----------------------

MIT Sustainability Summit 2015 - Farming, Food, and the Future
Friday, April 24, 2015 at 8:00 AM - Saturday, April 25, 2015 at 4:00 PM
MIT, McDermott Court, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mit-sustainability-summit-2015-farming-food-and-the-future-tickets-15693724352
Cost:  $50-$150

Farming, Food, and the Future:  Changing the Shape of Agricultural Systems
Sponsored by Abdul Latif Jameel World Water and Food Security Lab and Pure Strategies
The 7th Annual MIT Sustainability Summit will focus on understanding—and offering solutions to—the complex problems facing local and global agriculture systems. This year’s Summit will tackle food and farming challenges through the lens of the “Circular Economy,” a systems-thinking approach that demonstrates that a flourishing, sustainable world is built on intentionally cycling resources between production and consumption: from farm to table and back again.
Speakers include:
Britt Lundgren ~ Director of Organic and Sustainable Agriculture, Stonyfield Farm
Fedele Bauccio ~ CEO, Bon Appetit Management Company and 2014 EY Entrepreneur of the Year
Kathleen Merrigan ~ Executive Director, George Washington Sustainability Institute and Former Undersecretary, US Department of Agriculture

Our full agenda will be announced shortly on the Sustainability Summit website at http://sustainabilitysummit.mit.edu

We encourage you to buy tickets early - we do have limited attendance capacity this year.

Interested in volunteering at the Summit? Please reach out to the Summit Operations Team.

We will not be able to refund tickets after purchase.

----------------------------

RootsCamp MA
April 25-26
1199SEIU in Dorchester.

Not familiar with RootsCamp MA? This is a cross-issue, progressive, movement building "unconference" where the attendees drive the agenda.
Learn more at www.RootsCampMA.org.

*Registration is open*
You are invited to attend. We encourage you to register for the event this week at www.rootscampma15.eventbrite.com. Tickets are $20 and include breakfast, lunch, and snacks for two days. A limited number of $10 tickets are available. Sponsorships of $100, $250, and $500 help keep the ticket price accessible.

*Call for volunteers*
RootsCamp MA is an all-volunteer effort that is organized in just 10 weeks.  We will need additional help throughout the weekend of the event. Please
fill out the volunteer interest form
so we can match your availability, skills, and interest as we schedule volunteers.

*What will YOU present?*
Since this is a participant-driven event so we are strongly encouraging you to come prepared to present a session or facilitate a dialogue. You know what you know, and you know what you are curious about. Bring that and we'll all benefit from the shared learning and relationship building. It's an "unconference", so all sessions are chosen the morning of the event. Let us know what session you might lead so we can create some buzz about it!

*Who will you invite?*
Invite your friends to the Facebook event and share this Facebook
graphic .
On Twitter? Follow @RootsCampMA and click the links below to share these tweets:

ClickToTweet: .@RootsCampMA progressive
"unconference" April 25-26 @ 1199SEIU in Dorchester. $10-$20
http://ctt.ec/3_92D+ #Boston #p2 #rootsma Pls RT

ClickToTweet: Looking for RootsCamp MA call for proposals? "Unconference" = agenda decided on the spot. Sign up!
www.RootsCampMA.org  #rootsma #p2 #Boston

p.s. Curious what to expect? Check out the 2013 RootsCamp MA Storify
for photos, videos, and tweets. You'll see the magic we created together.

Robbie Samuels & David Sloane
RootsCamp MA Lead Organizers
www.RootsCampMA.org

-------------------------------

PirateCon 2015
Saturday, April 25
10:00am
The Community Church of Boston, 565 Boylston St # 2, Boston, Massachusetts

PirateCon 2015 will be Saturday, April 25th. It will be all day and we plan to end at 6pm. After the conference, we will go out for dinner. We will hold elections for the Pirate Council. Special guest Rick Falkvinge will address the con by video uplink.

Registration is $10. Youth under 18 are free. Please pay on-line here:
https://secure.piryx.com/donate/ZeBuHGQi/Massachusetts-Pirate-Party/piratecon2015

If you are under 18 or want to pay at the conference, please register with this form.

https://masspirates.org/crew/forms/register-piratecon-2015

-------------------------------

Pick a Tree, Plant a Tree: an Arbor Day workshop with Ranger Jean
Saturday, April 25
1-1:30pm
Cambridge Water Department, Fresh Pond Reservation, Cambridge
RSVP by April 18 with jrogers@cambridgema.gov

Learn how to pick ideal tree species for your location, then learn how to plant a tree with Ranger Jean! 

Did you know that each human on Earth needs 7 mature trees to take up the CO2 we breathe out? Do you know where your 7 trees are? Learn about selecting and planting trees in your Cambridge location. After activity based learning inside the Maynard Ecology Center, apply what you've learned by planting a tree on the Reservation. Rain postpones to May 2. For directions on what to bring and wear, please register by April 18 by emailing jrogers@cambridgema.gov.

(617) 349-6489

-------------------------------

Trends in Technology (part of Cambridge Science Festival)
Saturday, April 25
3:00 PM to 4:30 PM
Cambridge Public Library Lecture Hall, 449 Broadway, Cambridge

Wondering how new technologies like 3D printing, Internet of Things, Wearable Tech, and Unmanned Civilian Vehicles will affect you? Read on!

The Greater Boston Chapter of ACM is proud to be a part of the Festival.  We are producing a presentation which will  explore some of the latest headline­-grabbing technology trends. Our speaker, Greg Page, will describe and de­mystify 9 areas of technology that are changing everyone's life: 3D printing, Internet of Things, Wearable Tech, IPv6, Bitcoin, NFC, Cloud Computing, Ephemeral Communication Apps, and Unmanned Civilian Vehicles. He explains the meaning behind the related buzzwords, and the impact of each of these emerging tech fields for individuals, small businesses, and society in general.

We plan to provide some light refreshments before and after the talk, so please RSVP at http://www.meetup.com/ACM-Boston/events/221218999/ so we can plan appropriate quantities.

Speaker: Greg Page, is a 2014 graduate of the MIT Sloan School of Management, affiliate of MIT's Venture Mentoring Service, former US Navy Intelligence Officer, and now a Captain in the United States Army Reserve.  Greg is also an Adjunct Computer Science Lecturer at Boston University and CEO and co-founder of Merrimack Analysis Group.

----------------------------

Film: "Into the Ovoid: an Ovella"
Saturday, April 25
3:00p–4:30p
MIT, Building W79-074, 229 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Film Maker Tina Brand
Screen premier of "Into the Ovoid: an Ovella" - a short, stop-animation film featuring Pysanky (Ukrainian easter eggs). Local artist, Tina Brand, has created intricate and unusual designs on eggs for over three decades using the traditional wax-resist process. Now, as a filmmaker, she has created an on-screen experience featuring her decorated eggs - in a colorful, gravity-defying world of friendship, movement, acceptance, and heart breaking loss. An original soundtrack of improvisations by local musicians Christa Rakich, Aristides Rivas, and Joe K. This event includes a Q & A with Tina and the animators of Abbott Imaging, a display of her amazingly fragile Pysanky eggs, and an egg breaking event.

Web site: http://intotheovoid.com/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Tickets: None required
Sponsor(s): Division of Student Life, Residential Scholars @ Simmons Hall, Funded with a generous contribution from Bill R. ('56) and Betsy P. Leitch.
For more information, contact:  Ellen M. Essigmann
617-225-1403
emessig@mit.edu

----------------------
Sunday, April 26
----------------------

Economic Prosperity For Peace Conference
Sunday, April 26
8:00 AM to 3:00 PM (EDT)
Harvard Business School, 117 Western Avenue, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/economic-prosperity-for-peace-conference-tickets-16004624262
Cost:  $16.82 - $27.37

The goal of the "Economic Prosperity for Peace" conference is to explore the role that the private sector can play in building and promoting economic prosperity for Arabs and Israelis alike as a catalyst for regional stability and cooperation. The conference will take place over one day and through addresses from keynote speakers and several different panels, explore how entrepreneurship, infrastructure development, skills-based training and education can play an important role in laying the groundwork for an eventual and sustainable peace in the region.

-----------------------------

Science Festival After Party at Aeronaut
Sunday, April 26
5:00pm - 10:00pm
Aeronaut Brewery, 14 Tyler Street, Somerville

Sip the science festival brew and toast to geeky science love everywhere with festival revelers. Cheers!

http://www.cambridgesciencefestival.org/2015Festival/2015ScheduleOfEvents.aspx
----------------------------

Hi-Fi Sci Art: Preserving Our Planet
Sunday, April 26
7:30p–9:00p
MIT, Building N51, MIT Museum, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Dinosaur Annex
Hear five new compositions commissioned specially for the Festival, performed by Dinosaur Annex professionals, young guest musicians and dancers, and inspired by visual artists whose displayed works compel us to preserve our fragile ecosystems. At the close, audience members will have a chance to ask questions of the collaborators.

Web site: http://web.mit.edu/museum/programs/festival.html
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): MIT Museum
For more information, contact:  Josie Patterson
617-253-5927
museuminfo@mit.edu

----------------------
Monday, April 27
----------------------

MASS Seminar - Clara Orbe (GSFC)
Monday, April 27
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus)

Speaker: Clara Orbe

MASS Seminar

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): MIT Atmospheric Science Seminars (MASS)
For more information, contact:  MASS organizing committee
mass@mit.edu

------------------------------

Low-carbon leapfrogging and globalization: How China developed its solar PV industry
Monday, April 27
12:00PM - 1:30PM
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, HKS, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

with Christian Binz, Giorgio Ruffolo Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Sustainability Science Program and Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group, Harvard Kennedy School

ETIP/Consortium Energy Policy Seminar
http://www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/cepr/

Contact Name:  Louisa Lund
Louisa_Lund@hks.harvard.edu

------------------------------

Urban Nature / Human Nature
Monday, April 27
12:10 pm
Arnold Arboretum, Weld Hill Lecture Hall, Jamaica Plain

Peter Del Tredici, Arnold Arboretum and Harvard Graduate School of Design
------------------------------

"Cities, Technologies and Political Imaginaries"
Monday, April 27
12:15 pm - 2:00 pm
Room 100F, Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Antoine Picon, Harvard, GSD

STS Circle at Harvard

-------------------------------

Israel’s Triangular Cyber Eco-system, Academia, Government and Industry
Monday, April 27
2:00 PM to 3:30 PM
MIT, Stata Center, 32 Vassar Street, Room- D463, Cambridge

Hear from Major Gen. (Res.) Professor Isaac Ben-Israel serves as Head of the Interdisciplinary Cyber Research Center (ICRC). Additionally, he serves as Chairman of the Yuval Ne’eman Workshop for Science, Technology and Security, Chairman of the Israeli Space Agency and Chairman of the National Council for Research and Development in the Ministry of Science.

This is the first event in the CyberSecurity@CSAIL Lecture Series.

CyberSecurity@CSAIL

Cyber systems cover nearly every aspect of our lives. Current systems have vulnerabilities that, when compromised, can result in devastating and costly damage. Exposure to breaches in security grow as companies invest in technologies such as the cloud, mobile, and social media.

"There are two kinds of companies today. Those that have experienced a security breach and those that don't know it yet." ~Howard Shrobe

The goal of CyberSecurity@CSAIL is to identify and develop technologies to address the most significant security issues confronting organizations in the next decade. Presently, approaches to system security do not give overall security guarantees, but rather attacks are fought individually - “patch and pray” style. CyberSecurity@CSAIL aims to provide an integrated and formal approach to the security of systems, combining design and analysis methods from cryptography, software and hardware.

Directed by Dr. Howard Shrobe, the effort involves a focused group of industry partners. Throughout the year members will participate in a series of meetings to discuss key issues, learn about ongoing CSAIL research, and suggest new lines of research in the space. The initiative is meant to address the technical challenges of cybersecurity more holistically. Shrobe says that many companies assume that security vulnerabilities are inevitable and therefore adopt "patch-and-pray" strategies that manage attacks retroactively rather than fight them systematically.

-------------------------------

The Value of Regulatory Discretion: Estimates from Environmental Inspections in India - joint with IO and Development
Monday, April 27
4:00p–5:30p
MIT, Building E62-650, 100 Main Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Rohini Pande (Harvard University)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Microeconomic Applications
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal@mit.edu 

-------------------------------

The Arab Networked Public Sphere: Social Mobilization Post-Revolutions
Monday, April 27
5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
Harvard Law School, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East C (second floor), 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP required for those attending in person at http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/events/2015/04/NetworkedPublicSphere#RSVP

With special guests, Lina Attalah, Rob Faris (moderator), Jazem Halioui, Fares Mabrouk, Dalia Othman and Nagla Rizk
Join us for a round-table discussion on the networked public sphere and social mobilization post-revolutions in the Arab world. Researchers working with Harvard’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society, the American University in Cairo’s Access to Knowledge for Development Center, Innova Tunisia and the Arab Policy Institute will discuss current research conducted on the evolution of the networked public sphere in Egypt and Tunisia.

The networked public sphere has emerged as an influential medium for sharing news, disseminating information, and mediating collective action. Many have pointed to the impact of digital media on politics and public affairs, particularly in promoting and coordinating popular protests. Digitally mediated collective action continues to play a prominent role in the political landscape in Egypt and Tunisia. Nevertheless, rigorous assessments of the networked public sphere’s impact, modalities, and relationship to collective action offline are still rare.

In this session, we will present and discuss research that focuses on tracking and analyzing the socio-political topics in online content and their interplay with offline networks based on fieldwork research in Egypt and Tunisia.

This research is part of a joint effort by the Berkman Center, the American University in Cairo’s Access to Knowledge for Development Center (A2K4D), Innova Tunisia and the Arab Policy Institute.

Lina Attalah is the chief editor of Mada Masr, a Cairo-based news website. She is also a research fellow with the Access to Knowledge for Development Center.

Rob Faris (moderator) is the Research Director of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University.

Jazem Halioui is the CEO of Innova Tunisia and an entrepreneur with eighteen years of experience in bootstrapping and managing companies in Tunisia and France.

Fares Mabrouk is the Director of the Arab Policy Institute, a Tunis-based think tank. He also leads Yunus Social Business (YSB) global acceleration programs.

Dalia Othman is a Berkman Fellow and Visiting Scholar at MIT's Center for Civic Media.

Nagla Rizk is a professor of economics and founding director of the Access to Knowledge for Development Center at the American University in Cairo.

Event Hashtag: #ArabNPS

-------------------------------

Gadda Goes To War
WHEN  Mon., Apr. 27, 2015, 5 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Science Center, Theater C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Theater
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Romance Languages and Literatures, Harvard University, in collaboration with the Italian Consulate General Boston, the Edinburgh Gadda Prize, the Italian Colloquium and Chiasmi 2015. Event sponsored by the Lauro De Bosis Foundation and Tony Crolla, Vittoria Group Edinburgh UK.
SPEAKER(S)  Fabrizio Gifuni and Federica G. Pedriali
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  http://www.gaddaprize.ed.ac.uk/events.php
TICKET INFO  Seat reservation is highly recommended. To reserve your seats email fpedriali@fas.harvard.edu
CONTACT INFO fpedriali@fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Lecture-performance based on Carlo Emilio Gadda's WWI Diaries and anti-Mussolini's writings.
When do we start going to war with our country, and why? What did it mean to go to war from WWI to WWII and beyond, in Italy, before and after Mussolini?
Italy’s leading actor Fabrizio Gifuni takes these questions on board as he presents his award-winning show "Gadda Goes to War" (Ubu Prize for Best Actor and Best Show) in this unique lecture-performance addressed to all those with a passion for civic commitment and political theater.
The show had a sold-out British premiere at the Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh, as part of Edinburgh 2012.
Languages: English and Italian
LINK http://www.gaddaprize.ed.ac.uk/events.php

-------------------------------

Driving the Future: Combating Climate Change with Cleaner, Smarter Cars
Monday, April 27
5:15PM
Harvard, Geology Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street 1st Floor, Cambridge

Margo Oge, Vice Chairman of the Board of Deltawing Technologies, and former director of the Office of Transportation Air Quality at the US Environmental Protection Agency, author of Driving the Future:  Combatting Climate Change with Cleaner, Smarter Cars

“The author has a vision for the future of the automobile. It's not exactly the flying car of the future, but almost, as it comes with smartphone-synced scheduling, zero-emissions technology, and the ability to park itself. . . . Astute . . . Oge knows her stuff.”  —Kirkus Reviews

In Driving the Future: Combating Climate Change with Cleaner, Smarter Cars (Arcade Publishing, April 7, 2015), Margo Oge envisions a future of clean, intelligent vehicles with lighter frames and alternative power trains, such as plug in electric and fuel cell vehicles that produce zero emissions and average 100+ mpg. The cars of tomorrow will have more in common with our smart phones than with the vehicles we drive today. With electronic architectures more like that of airplanes, they will be smarter and safer, will park themselves, and will network with other vehicles on the road to drive themselves, save fuel and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. These innovative vehicles will be necessary to combat climate change as the transportation sector accounts for one-third the global greenhouse gas emissions in the US.

Oge also provides the ultimate insider’s account of the partnership between federal agencies, California and car manufacturers that led to President Obama’s historic 2012 deal targeting greenhouse gas emissions from passenger vehicles. The deal will double the fuel efficiency of cars by 2025, avoid burning 12 billion barrels of oil and prevent the creation of 6 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, all while saving the consumer $1.7 trillion. She describes the efforts of a wide-ranging group of people— from a staunchly Republican Texas hedge fund millionaire to a former California public school teacher to the Georgetown lawyer who prepared the winning argument for a Supreme Court decision on greenhouse gases, to dedicated EPA engineers in Ann Arbor who play critical roles in the first national climate action in the US.

In large part because of strengthening clean air regulations, Americans are seeing more innovation and faster adoption of advanced technologies.  Today, we can already buy several models that achieve 100 mpg, and there are seventy-six alternative powertrain vehicle models in showrooms. Yet, to avert the worst impact of climate change by 2050, Oge claims that it will be necessary for cars and light trucks to average 180 mpg by 2050—a bold but not impossible target.

To pursue this goal more broadly, Oge also takes the reader through the convergence of macro global trends, advanced power train technologies, energy sources and social trends that will continue to drive car innovation over the next forty years and be every bit as transformative as those wrought by Karl Benz and Henry Ford.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:
Margo Oge is the Vice Chairman of the Board of Deltawing Technologies, a company bringing a fuel-efficient racing car from the track to the road. Ms. Oge also serves on the boards of the Union of Concerned Scientists, the National Academy of Sciences for Energy and Environment, the International Council for Clean Transportation and the Alliance for Climate Education. Additionally, she is a member of the Department of Energy’s Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Advisory Committee and the National Academies of Science Advisory Committee for the U.S. Global Climate Change Research Program.

Margo Oge served at the US Environmental Protection Agency for 32 years, the last 18 of which she directed the Office of Transportation Air Quality. While there, she was a chief architect of some of the most important achievements in reducing transportation-related air pollution. As a result of these rules, emissions from cars, trucks, buses, off-road vehicles, locomotives and marine vessels—as well as gasoline and diesel fuel—were reduced up to 99 percent. These regulations prevent over 40,000 premature deaths and hundreds of thousands of respiratory illnesses each year.

Ms. Oge led the Obama Administration’s landmark 2012 Clean Air Act deal with automakers, the nation’s first action targeting greenhouse gases. This regulation will double the fuel efficiency of automakers’ fleets to 54.5 mpg and cut greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2025. In the New York Times, Tom Friedman praised the new rules as the “Big Deal” that redeemed the administration’s previous inaction.

In Driving the Future: Combating Climate Change with Cleaner, Smarter Cars, Ms. Oge provides an insider’s account of the science, politics, policy, legal battles and, most importantly, the people who made possible this historic regulation. She then describes the technological, social, economic and regulatory terrain in which even larger reductions in greenhouse gases could be achieved. Finally, she lays out the future of technology that will enable a global market for super-efficient, zero carbon-emitting vehicles and other sustainable personal mobility options. According to Jerry Brown, Governor of California, “This is the story of how hard it is to combat climate change—and also how imaginative and determined leaders can get it done.“

Ms. Oge holds an MS in Engineering from University of Massachusetts-Lowell. She has received presidential awards for her work at the EPA from President Bill Clinton and President George W Bush.

Contact Name:  Lisa Matthews
matthew@fas.harvard.edu

-------------------------------

Catalyst Conversations Faces, Genes, Patterns, Stories: Alberta Chu and Murray O. Robinson
Monday, April 27 
7:00p–8:30p
MIT, Building E15, Bartos Theater, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Catalyst Conversations is pleased to present filmmaker Alberta Chu and research scientist Murray Robinson as they discuss the ideas and results of their current collaboration: FaceTopo. This project stems from their interest in the genetics of faces and a big question: how does one approach quantifying faces? Together, they have set out to build a taxonomy of 3D faces by conceiving a global citizen project to crowd-source data. The FaceTopo App collects data from users, so anyone with an smart phone can create a 3D facemap and join the community.

Web site: http://listart.mit.edu/events-programs/catalyst-conversations-faces-genes-patterns-stories-alberta-chu-and-murray-o
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): List Visual Arts Center
For more information, contact:  Deborah Davidson
deborahdavidson@catalystconversations.net 

-------------------------------

Art, Culture and Technology Lecture: MICHAEL RAKOWITZ
Monday, April 27
7:00p–9:00p
MIT, Building E15-070, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

MIT Architecture Lecture Series
Part of the Spring 2015 Department of Architecture Lecture Series, "Experiments in Architecture".

Part of the 2015 ACT Lecture Series, Civic Art: The lecture series investigates the critical spatial practices that claim manifold definitions of public art, through a diverse array of visual forms argued by key practitioners across the disciplines of art, pedagogy, architecture, and urban studies to identify the tools, tactics and consequences of actively reclaiming public space.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Department of Architecture, ACT
For more information, contact:  Amanda Moore
617-253-4415
amm@mit.edu

-----------------------
Tuesday, April 28
-----------------------

Intellectual Privacy
Tuesday, April 28
12:00 pm
Harvard Law School, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East A (second floor)
RSVP required for those attending in person at http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/events/luncheon/2015/04/Richards#RSVP
Event will be webcast live on http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/events/luncheon/2015/04/Richards at 12:00 pm.

with author Neil Richards
Why is it bad when the government or companies monitor our reading or web-surfing? We have intuitions that this kind of surveillance is bad, but have failed to explain why digital monitoring in an age of terror and innovation is really a problem. In Intellectual Privacy, Neil Richards offers a new way of thinking about monitoring of our thinking, reading, and communications, one that ensures that our ideas and values keep pace with our technologies.

Although we often think of privacy and free speech as being in conflict, Richards shows how privacy and free speech are often essential to each other. He explains the importance of 'intellectual privacy,' protection from surveillance or interference when we are engaged in the processes of generating ideas - thinking, reading, and speaking with confidantes before our ideas are ready for public consumption. In our digital age, in which we increasingly communicate, read, and think with the help of technologies that track us, increased protection for intellectual privacy has become an imperative.

A timely and provocative book on a subject that affects us all, Intellectual Privacy will radically reshape the debate about privacy and free speech in our digital age.

About Neil
Neil Richards is an internationally-recognized expert in privacy law, information law, and freedom of expression. He is a professor of law at Washington University School of Law, an affiliate scholar with the Stanford Center for Internet and Society, a member of the Advisory Board of the Future of Privacy Forum, and a consultant and expert in privacy cases. He graduated in 1997 with degrees in law and history from the University of Virginia, and served as a law clerk to Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist.

Professor Richards is the author of Intellectual Privacy (Oxford Press 2015). His many writings on privacy and civil liberties have appeared in many academic journals including the Harvard Law Review, the Columbia Law Review, the Virginia Law Review, and the California Law Review. He has written for a more general audience in Time, Slate, Wired, CNN.com, Forbes, the Boston Review, and the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Professor Richards regularly speaks about privacy, technology, and civil liberties throughout the United States and Europe, and also appears frequently in the media. At Washington University, he teaches courses on privacy, free speech, and constitutional law, and is a past winner of the Washington University School of Law's Professor of the Year award. He was born in England, educated in the United States, and lives with his family in St. Louis. He is an avid cyclist and a lifelong supporter of Liverpool Football Club.

Twitter:  @neilmrichards
Web:  neilrichards.com

--------------------------

Religion in the News - Inflicting Death: Should the State Execute Dzhokhar Tsarnaev?
WHEN  Tue., Apr. 28, 2015, 12 – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Conference Room, CSWR, 42 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Religion
SPONSOR Center for the Study of World Religions
CONTACT cswr@hds.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Harvard faculty, staff, and students are invited to join us for a discussion on this complex topic.
Lunch will be served. RSVPs are appreciated but not required: cswr@hds.harvard.edu

-----------------------------

Looking inside moons with gravity and topography
Tuesday, April 28
12:30 pm - 1:30 pm
MIT, Building 54-517 (the tallest building on campus)

Francis Nimmo, Professor Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz
Gravity measurements provide one of the few ways of looking inside a planetary body. In this talk I will discuss how gravity measurements of our Moon and the icy Saturnian satellites Titan and Enceladus provide insight into their internal structure and thermal evolution.

All are welcome.

If you have any questions regarding the lecture, please contact Alli Cocuzzo at 617.253.9317 or cocuzzo@mit.edu. Reservations not required.
Sponsored by  the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, MIT.

-----------------------------

Building Newborn Minds in Virtual Worlds
Tuesday, April 28
4:00p–5:30p
MIT, Building 46-3189, 15 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Justin Wood
Abstract:  What are the origins of high-level vision: Is this ability hardwired by genes or learned during development? Although researchers have been wrestling with this question for over a century, progress has been hampered by two major limitations: (1) most newborn animals cannot be raised in controlled environments from birth, and (2) most newborn animals cannot be observed and tested for long periods of time. Thus, it has generally not been possible to characterize how specific visual inputs relate to specific cognitive outputs in the newborn brain.

To overcome these two limitations, I recently developed an automated, high-throughput controlled-rearing technique. This technique can be used to measure all of a newborn animal's behavior (9 samples/second, 24 hours/day, 7 days/week) within strictly controlled virtual environments. In this talk, I will describe a series of controlled-rearing experiments that reveal how one high-level visual ability "invariant object recognition" emerges in the newborn brain. Further, I will show how these controlled-rearing data can be linked to models of visual cortex for characterizing the computations underlying newborn vision. More generally, I will argue that controlled rearing can serve as a critical tool for testing between different theories and models, both for developmental psychology and computational neuroscience.

Web site: http://cbmm.mit.edu/news-events/events/building-newborn-minds-virtual-worlds
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): Center for Brains, Minds and Machines (CBMM)
For more information, contact:  Kathleen D. Sullivan
cbmm-contact@mit.edu

---------------------------

Migration, National Security, and New forms of Policing: Dubai and Abu Dhabi
Tuesday, April 28
4:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building E40-464, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Noora A. Lori,Assistant Professor of International Relations, Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies, Boston University
Today non-citizens make up 90 percent of the population in the United Arab Emirates. This 'demographic imbalance' is an outcome of combining expansive temporary worker schemes with a highly exclusionary citizenship regime. Both policies are regulated by a security apparatus that is increasingly pervasive. The expatriate population is at once sanctioned as a necessary economic force and a threat to be 'managed'. But how is this uneasy balance maintained? This presentation will explore the instruments of population management developed by the UAE's security forces - including extensive surveillance networks, multi-cultural community policing, and DNA imaging - to pre-empt the security threats associated with migrant populations. The research finds that security forces loyal to the state are not always instruments of top-down social control. Rather, as the police forces have become more involved in embedded surveillance and active policing strategies, they are also increasingly pulled into the role of alleviating the tensions and responding to communal struggles to define the UAE's public sphere.

A session of the Myron Weiner Seminar Series on International Migration.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies, Inter-University Committee on International Migration
For more information, contact:  Phiona Lovett
253-3848
phiona@mit.edu

---------------------------

Boston Green Drinks - April Happy Hour
Tuesday, April 28
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
Scholars, 25 School Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/boston-green-drinks-april-happy-hour-tickets-16472527774

Join the conversation with sustainability professionals and hobbyists.  Enjoy a drink and build your connection with our green community!
Keep sending feedback to Lyn@bostongreendrinks.com for ideas about speakers or content for the future and mark your calendar for drinks on the last Tuesday of every month.  Also, if you RSVP and can't make it, e-mail us to let us know.

Boston Green Drinks  builds a community of sustainably-minded Bostonians, provides a forum for exchange of sustainability career resources, and serves as a central point of information about emerging green issues.  We support the exchange of ideas and resources about sustainable energy, environment, food, health, education.

---------------------------

Disease Gone Global:  What Causese Epidemics?
Tuesday, April 28
6pm - 7:30pm
Harvard Medical School, Joseph B Martin Conference Center, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston

Humankind is in an ongoing struggle against infectious invaders.  New diseases are spreading around the globe and diseases that were once considered eradicated are now making a comeback. What's driving the resurgence?  Where do these bugs come from?  How do they spread?  In this seminar researchers explain how they are developing ways to track, control and eventually cure these diseases.

More information:  seminar@hms.harvard.edu
http://hms.harvard.edu/minimedschool
617-423-3038

------------------------------

Healthy Places in the Transition Century
Tuesday, April 28
7:00PM - 8:30PM
Hunnewell Building, Arnold Arboretum, 125 Arborway, Boston
RSVP at http://my.arboretum.harvard.edu
Cost:  $10
Students: Email to register for free.

An Arnold Arboretum lecture with Ann Forsyth, PhD, Professor of Urban Planning, Harvard Graduate School of Design
In the coming century urban populations around the world will grow at uneven rates--some places will lose population in metropolitan areas and others gain it. Populations in most places will be older on average. How can the growing body of research on the connections between health and environments be used to make a positive contribution to evolving urban and suburban communities? Ann Forsyth will speak about the components that contribute to healthier and more sustainable cities, alternatives to sprawl, and the tensions that exist between social and ecological values in urban design.

https://my.arboretum.harvard.edu/Info.aspx?DayPlanner=1407&DayPlannerDate=4/28/2015
Contact Name:  Pamela Thompson
pam_thompson@harvard.edu

-------------------------------

Science at MIT: From the Cold War to the Climate Crisis
Tuesday, April 28, 2015
7:00p
MIT, Building 10-250, 222 Memorial Drive, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Noam Chomsky, Institute Professor Emeritus and Subrata Ghoshroy, Research Affiliate; MIT Program in Science, Technology and Society
Subrata Ghoshroy and Noam Chomsky will be discussing how scientific research at MIT has been affected for the past 50+ years by its relationship with outside funding agencies, in particular the US military.

Since the end of the World War II the federal government has largely funded scientific research at US universities. MIT has been receiving millions of dollars annually and a large part of the federal funding comes from the military.

Scientific research is driven by the passion of students and scholars. But what else shapes and influences our research? And what are the social and economical consequences of our research? At the height of the Vietnam War in 1969, in a campus wide protest, MIT students raised these very questions.

Today, the US government is engaged in a "war against terrorism" which has undermined the scope of our civil liberties. We also face social and political threats from climate change and an energy crisis. What should be the role of MIT in fighting these global challenges? 

Although the Vietnam War is in the past, the pressing issues and questions that were brought to the forefront then are stunningly relevant today. Please join us for this provocative discussion.

Web site: radius.mit.edu
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): The Technology and Culture Forum at MIT, MIT Chapter of Science for the People
For more information, contact:  Patricia-Maria Weinmann
617-253-0108
weinmann@mit.edu

*****************
----------------------
Upcoming Events
----------------------
*****************

---------------------------
Wednesday, April 29
---------------------------

 "Who's Arming Asia, and Why it Matters"
Wednesday, April 29
12:00p–1:30p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Wednesday Seminar Series, Security Studies Program

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:  Elina Hamilton
617-253-7529
elinah@mit.edu

-----------------------------------

Preserving Place: Issues and Insights in Documenting Cultural Heritage in the Modern Middle East
Wednesday, April 29
1:00p–2:00p
MIT, Building 3-370, 33 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
Registration is encouraged http://libcal.mit.edu/event.php?id=945938
Speaker: Dr. Sharon C. Smith, Program Head, Aga Khan Documentation Center, MIT Libraries
Throughout the Middle East, cultural heritage is being destroyed faster than we can document it. This paper examines the processes and praxes necessary to capture information documenting material and visual culture - from monumental to ephemeral - for future generations.


Open to: the general public
Cost: free
Sponsor(s): MIT Libraries
For more information, contact:  Jenn Morris
preserve@mit.edu 


-----------------------------------

Wired: A World Transformed by the Telegraph
Wednesday, April 29
2:30p–3:00p
MIT, Building 14N-130, 160 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Come check out the current exhibit at the Maihaugen Gallery with a guided tour led by Stephen Skuce, Program Manager for Rare Books, MIT Institute Archives and Special Collections.

Web site: http://libraries.mit.edu/preserve/preservation-week/
Open to: the general public
Cost: free
Sponsor(s): MIT Libraries
For more information, contact:  Jenn Morris
preserve@mit.edu 

-----------------------------------


Massachusetts Space Grant Consortium - Annual Distinguished Public Lecture
Wednesday, April 29, 2015
2:30p–4:00p
MIT, Building 37-212, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Astronaut Stanley Love

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): AeroAstro, Massachusetts Space Grant Consortium
For more information, contact:  Liz Zotos
617-253-7805
zotos@mit.edu 

-----------------------------------

Deciphering the Evolution of a Cancer, One Cell at a Time
WHEN  Wed., Apr. 29, 2015, 4 p.m.
WHERE  Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Sheerr Room, Fay House, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
SPEAKER(S)  2014-15 Grass Fellow in Honor of Professor W. B. Cannon and Cornelia Cannon at the Radcliffe Institute
COST  Free and open to the public
LINK http://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2015-itai-yanai-fellow-presentation

-------------------------------------

Translational Research in Mechanics and Structures: From Nano to Continuum
Wednesday, April 29
 4:00p–5:00p
MIT, Building 1-131, 

Speaker: Prof. Ken P. Chong
Abstract: Nano science and engineering is one of the frontiers in transformative and translational research. Led by NSF over the past decade, converging interdisciplinary areas of nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology, and cognitive science (NBIC) offer the potential of improving human lives as well as society well-being and productivity. Nanotechnology is a very efficient way for the creation of new materials, devices and systems at the molecular level which requires simulation in the multi-scale mechanics. Smart materials, intelligent structures, and sustainability on the other hand have also seen new advances. Mechanics is the common thread among these interdisciplinary areas. Research and challenges in nanotechnology, NBIC converging technologies, simulation-based engineering and sciences, multi-scale systems, energy, smart structures/materials and other related areas are to be presented.
Ken P. Chong, Ph.D.,P.E, was the former Interim Division Director, Engineering Advisor, and Program Director of Mechanics and Materials at the National Science Foundation (NSF), until 2009. Currently he is a Research Professor at George Washington University, advising graduate students, teaching, mentoring young faculty members, doing research, lectures, consulting and other activities.

Mechanics and Infrastructure

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Civil and Environmental Engineering
For more information, contact:  Oral Buyukozturk
617-253-7101
obuyuk@mit.edu 

-------------------------------

Hrant Dink Memorial Lecture on Human Rights: Forced Migration and Human Rights: Can we maintain the promise of protection?
Wednesday, April 29
4:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building E51-115, Wong Auditorium, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Jennifer Leaning
Dr. Jennifer Leaning is the guest speaker at the inauguration of a new lecture series honoring the late human-rights activist Hrank Dink.

About the Speaker:
Jennifer Leaning is the Francois-Xavier Bagnoud Professor of the Practice of Health and Human Rights Director, FXB Center for Health and Human Rights, at the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Leaning's research and policy interests include issues of public health, medical ethics, and early warning in response to war and disaster, human rights and international humanitarian law in crisis settings, and problems of human security in the context of forced migration and conflict. She has field experience in problems of public health assessment and human rights in a range of crisis situations (including Afghanistan, Albania, Angola, Kosovo, the Middle East, former Soviet Union, Somalia, the Chad-Darfur border, and the African Great Lakes area) and has written widely on these issues.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:  starrforum@mit.edu 

-------------------------------

Giving Voice to Values: The "How" of Values-Driven Leadership
Wednesday, April 29
5:30p–6:30p
MIT, Building 32-141, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Mary Gentile | Senior Research Scholar at Babson College
Dr. Gentile will share a ground-breaking new approach to preparing business managers and leaders for values-driven leadership. Drawing on both the actual experience of business practitioners as well as cutting edge research, GIVING VOICE TO VALUES (GVV) fills a long-standing and critical gap in our understanding of how to enable ethical practice. Rather than a focus on ethical analysis, GVV focuses on ethical implementation and asks the question: ???What if I were going to act on my values? What would I say and do? How could I be most effective???? 

GVV was launched by The Aspen Institute and Yale School of Management, and is now housed and funded by Babson College. Developed by Gentile, a veteran of Harvard Business School and pioneer in both ethics and diversity management curriculum, GVV is now being piloted in over 740 educational and executive settings. Giving Voice to Values holds the promise to transform the foundational assumptions upon which the teaching of business ethics is based, and importantly, to equip future business leaders to not only know what is right ??? but how to make it happen.

Legatum Lecture Series
The Legatum Lecture Series is intended to expose the broader MIT and neighboring communities to entrepreneurship in emerging markets.

Web site: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/giving-voice-to-values-the-how-of-values-driven-leadership-registration-16416697785
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/giving-voice-to-values-the-how-of-values-driven-leadership-registration-16416697785
Sponsor(s): Legatum Center for Development and Entrepreneurship
For more information, contact:  Kavan O'Connor
617-324-1875
legatum@mit.edu
-----------------------
Thursday, April 30
-----------------------

Lesley University Diversity Council presents Culture Fest 2015: Native American Cultures
Thursday, April 30
10am - 5pm
Lesley University Doble Campus, 34 Mellen Street, Cambridge

The Lesley University Diversity Council announces Culture Fest 2015 featuring Native American cultures on Thursday, April 30th. Gain a deeper understanding of Native American culture through daylong celebration and activities. Peruse authentic Native American wares, taste some Native American cuisine in White Dining Hall, view the film “Winter in the Blood” followed by a discussion, watch a performance by Joseph Firecrow – Cheyenne Flutist and Storyteller, and converse with the Wampanoag Native People from Plimouth Plantation. There will be gifts raffled off throughout the day. Come and learn about Native American cultures.

This event is free and open to the public. Below is a detailed agenda for the day.

Native American Vendors 10 am – 5 pm
Plimoth Plantation Table (2 Wampanoag Natives will have a demonstration table set up near the vendors) 10 am – 12 noon
Native American Cuisine 11 am – 2 pm
Film Screening & Dialogue “Winter in the Blood” (Marran Theater) 12:30 pm – 3 pm
Joseph Firecrow (Cheyenne Flutist and Storyteller) 3 – 5 pm

----------------------------

Calestous Juma on Reinventing African Development: Emerging Policy Perspectives
WHEN  Thu., Apr. 30, 2015, 11:45 a.m. – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, HKS< Bell Hall, 5th Floor Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Business, Humanities, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government (M-RCBG) at the Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Calestous Juma, professor of the practice of international development and director of the Science, Technology, and Globalization Project
CONTACT INFO Lunch will be served. Please RSVP to mrcbg@hks.harvard.edu

----------------------------

Optimizing Hydro-Reservoir operation using Model Predictive Control
Thursday, April 30
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building 48-308,

Speaker: Reetik Kumar
Environmental Fluid Mechanics/Hydrology
Join us for a weekly series of EFM/Hydrology topics by MIT faculty and students, as well as guest lecturers from around the globe.

This speaker Reetik Kumar (hosted by McLaughlin group)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Civil and Environmental Engineering
For more information, contact:  Noriko Endo
617-253-7101
enori@mit.edu

Editorial Comment:  I am assuming that this concerns hydroelectric power and pumped storage as well as possible ecological issues but I could be wrong.

----------------------------

Between Environmental Change, Hydropower and River Alterations
WHEN  Thu., Apr. 30, 2015, 12 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, 1730 Cambridge Street, Room S050, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Environmental Sciences, Lecture, Social Sciences, Sustainability
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies
SPEAKER(S)  Mauricio E. Arias, Giorgio Ruffolo Post-doctoral Research Fellow in Sustainability Science, Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Department
COST  Free and open to the public

----------------------------

Book Celebration/Panel on Health, Healthcare, and Inequalities in the United States
Thursday, April 30
3:30p–6:30p
MIT, Building 32-155, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Andrea Campbell, MIT; Jonathan Gruber, MIT; and Jennifer Hochschild, Harvard University
The Global Health and Medical Humanities Initiative (GHMHI), in conjunction with the Political Science Department and with support from SHASS Anthropology, is hosting a Book Celebration/Panel on Health, Healthcare, and Inequalities in the United States on 4/30/15. This event will feature Andrea Campbell, author of Trapped in America's Safety Net: One Family's Struggle, along with discussants Jonathan Gruber and Jennifer Hochschild.

Event Schedule:
3:30 PM - Reception
4:00 PM - Panel discussion
5:45 PM - Book signing/book sale

Paperback books will be available for sale at the event at a cost of $15.00 and payment will be accepted by cash, check, or credit card.

We hope you will be able to join us!

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Global Health and Medical Humanities Initiative, Anthropology Program, Political Science Department
For more information, contact:  Brittany Peters
bapeters@mit.edu
----------------------------

Climate Change and the Permafrost Carbon Feedback
Thursday, April 30
4:00p–5:00p
MIT, Building 48-316, 5 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Professor Ted Shuur, Northern Arizona University
Environmental Sciences Seminar Series
Join us for a weekly series of EFM/Hydrology topics by MIT faculty and students, as well as guest lecturers from around the globe.

Faculty Host: Dr. Benjamin Kocar, Assistant Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Web site: https://sites.google.com/site/parsonsseminars/home
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Civil and Environmental Engineering
For more information, contact:  Brenda E. Pepe
617-258-5554
pepebe@mit.edu
----------------------------

Compulsory Voting and Income Inequality
WHEN Thu., Apr. 30, 2015, 4:10 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Ash Center for Democratic Governance & Innovation, 124 Mount Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Law, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Ash Center for Democratic Governance & Innovation
SPEAKER(S)  John M. Carey is the John Wentworth Professor in the Social Sciences and the chair of the Government Department at Dartmouth College.
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS  John M. Carey is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the author or co-author of over 75 academic articles and 5 books, including Legislative Voting & Accountability (Cambridge UP 2009) and Presidents & Assemblies: Constitutional Design and Electoral Dynamics (Cambridge UP 1992). His research focuses on the design of constitutions and electoral systems, and on legislative politics. He has consulted on electoral system reform in Nepal, Afghanistan, Jordan, Tunisia, Yemen, South Sudan, Israel, Mexico, and the Philippines.
LINK http://ash.harvard.edu/Home/News-Events/Events/Comparative-Democracy-Seminar-Series

----------------------------

The Memory Factory
WHEN  Thu., Apr. 30, 2015, 4:15 p.m.
WHERE  Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Humanities, Lecture, Science, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
SPEAKER(S)  Elizabeth F. Loftus, Distinguished Professor of Social Ecology and Professor of Law and Cognitive Science at University of California, Irvine
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO events@radcliffe.harvard.edu
DETAILS  In this lecture, Loftus will explore the tricks that memory can play. For at least a century, scientists have demonstrated that memories are not always as they seem. More recently, they have shown that people can be led to develop entire memories for events that never happened: rich false memories. These findings have implications for the pursuit of justice in legal cases, for the practices of psychotherapists who listen to patients’ memories, and for everyday life.
LINK http://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2015-elizabeth-f-loftus-lecture

----------------------------

"Melville in the First Age of Viral Media"
Thursday, April 30
5:00p–7:00p
MIT, Building 4-231

Ryan Cordell, co-director of the Viral Texts project, will speak about his work uncovering pieces that "went viral" in nineteenth-century newspapers and magazines.

The Viral Texts project seeks to develop theoretical models that will help scholars better understand what qualities--both textual and thematic--helped particular news stories, short fiction, and poetry "go viral" in nineteenth-century newspapers and magazines. What texts were reprinted and why? How did ideas--literary, political, scientific, economic, religious--circulate in the public sphere and achieve critical force among audiences? How might computational methods reveal Melville's popular reception and reputation or expose the shaping influence of the popular press on his writing? And how can these popular (perhaps even ephemeral) texts thicken our understanding of literary authors like Herman Melville?

Cordell is Assistant Professor of English and Core Founding Faculty Member in the NULab for Texts, Maps, and Networks at Northeastern University (http://nulab.neu.edu). His scholarship focuses on convergences among literary, periodical, and religious culture in antebellum American mass media. Prof. Cordell collaborates with colleagues in English, History, and Computer Science on the NEH-funded Viral Texts project (http://viraltexts.org).

Join our mailing list for an event reminder email: http://cmsw.mit.edu/signup

Web site: http://cmsw.mit.edu/event/ryan-cordell-melville-in-the-first-age-of-viral-media/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Comparative Media Studies/Writing
For more information, contact:  Andrew Whitacre
617-324-0490
cmsw@mit.edu 

----------------------------

SOLUTIONS with/in/sight: Blood, Sweat & Pioneers
Thursday, April 30
6:00p–8:30p
MIT, Building 76, Koch Institute at MIT, 500 Main Street, Cambridge

Speaker: David Baltimore, Michael Hemann, John Whitaker
Action against cancer takes many forms, and progress comes when we push the limits of what's possible. David Baltimore, a Nobel laureate and founding member of MIT's Center for Cancer Research (the predecessor of the Koch Institute), worked tirelessly with his colleagues in an old candy factory, scrutinizing one gene at a time for clues to cancer's origins. His pioneering discoveries laid the groundwork for today's researchers, like Koch Institute member Michael Hemann. Hemann uses newer, faster, higher-volume screening methods and computational models to identify combination therapies that target blood and other cancers to overcome drug resistance. John Whitaker founded the Go Mitch Go Foundation in response to his son's heroic battle with childhood leukemia, to support endurance athletes in raising money for leukemia and lymphoma research. Together, these visionaries exemplify passion and perseverance--both in and outside the lab.

Web site: http://ki.mit.edu/news/events/withinsight/april-2015
Open to: the general public
Cost: free with registration
Tickets: http://withinsight-april2015.eventbrite.com/?aff=mitevents
Sponsor(s): Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research
For more information, contact:  Wendy Brown
617-324-2169
kievents@mit.edu 

Editorial Comment:  Yes, that Koch.

----------------------------

Internet Security and Privacy with Google
Thursday, April 30
6:00PM - 9:00PM
Cambridge Community Television, CCTV, 438 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Google will cover "access", "malware" and "phishing" security to help you stay safe online.

In this class, a representative from Google will cover the basics of how to safeguard your privacy online. You’ll learn how to keep the bad guys out, how to keep evil software at bay, and how to not fall for tricks and scams.The topics covered include “access security,” “malware security” and “phishing security.” Instructor: Curt Fennell

----------------------------


Computing on Encrypted Data
Thursday, April 30
7:00p–9:00p
MIT, Building 32-G449, CSAIL, Kiva, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Vinod Vaikuntanathan
The basic nature of encryption has always been all-or-nothing: anyone who knows the secret key can decode and recover the entire data; but, without the key, nothing can be revealed. The requirements of our modern computing world raise
fundamentally new challenges: Can we compute on encrypted data without decrypting it, and without knowledge of the secret key? Which functions can be computed this way? Who can learn the results of such computations? In this talk, I will present homomorphic encryption and functional encryption schemes, two powerful methods of computing on encrypted data.

Vinod Vaikuntanathan joined the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT as an Assistant Professor of Computer Science in September 2013. After receiving a S.M. and Ph.D. from MIT, he spent two years as a Postdoctoral Fellow at IBM T.J. Watson, one year as a researcher at Microsoft Redmond, and two years as an Assistant Professor at the University of Toronto. He is broadly interested in cryptography, security and distributed algorithms. His current research focus in cryptography is in developing technologies for computing on encrypted data, guaranteeing privacy of sensitive data while at the same time enabling computations on it. His work has been recognized with many awards including the George M. Sprowls Ph.D. Thesis Award at MIT, an IBM Josef Raviv Postdoctoral Fellowship, a University of Toronto Connaught Foundation Award, and an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship.

IEEE/ACM Joint Seminar Series
Exploring the edge of computing technology.

Web site: http://ewh.ieee.org/r1/boston/computer/
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0
Sponsor(s): ACM & IEEE/CS
For more information, contact:  Dorothy Curtis
617-253-0541
dcurtis@mit.edu 

----------------------------

Feminist Pedagogy in a Digital Age: A Workshop on Teaching with Technology
Thursday, April 30
7:30p–9:00p
MIT, Building 32-144, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Kim Surkan (WGS, MIT) and Jennifer Musto (WGS, Wellesley College)
The near-ubiquitous use of use of social media (and particularly networked and mobile communications technology in one form or another) by students and faculty invites questions about how these tools might be used in the classroom to facilitate dialogue and to foster collaborations between students and even across institutions. FemTechNet , a group of feminist academic scholars and teachers located within and beyond academe, has proposed a DOCC (Distributed Online Collaborative Course) model of pedagogy that enables instructors engaged in feminist pedagogy to connect with each other and use technology to bring students and faculty from many different locations into shared dialogue.

This workshop will introduce participants to FemTechNet and demonstrate selected teaching techniques now available to instructors seeking to use technology in their courses, including: Electronic feedback and response; Creative use of video as a form of student writing and response; Classroom use of Google docs, Google+, and Twitter to created curated and collaborative learning environments; Wikipedia Edit-a-thons, geo-locative software, and shared open source maps (will demonstrate the FemTechNet Situated Knowledges map project); Feminist video dialogues, etc.

Web site: http://web.mit.edu/gcws/news+events/2015gendertechnology.html
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies, Office of Digital Learning
For more information, contact:  Andrea Sutton
617-324-2085
gcws@mit.edu 

---------------------
Friday,  May 1
--------------------

Ending Institutional Corruption
WHEN  Fri., May 1 – Sat., May 2, 2015
WHERE  Harvard Law School, Milstein Conference Suite, Wasserstein Building,
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Business, Conferences, Education, Ethics, Exhibitions, Humanities, Law, Lecture, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics
SPEAKER(S)  Featuring:  Keynote Lecture by Francis Fukuyama
What is Institutional Corruption? with Lawrence Lessig and Dennis Thompson
Panels on fixing institutional corruption in government, law, academia, nonprofits, finance, economics, public health, medicine, journalism
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO katy@ethics.harvard.edu
DETAILS  A two day conference to celebrate the end of the Edmond J. Safra Lab on Institutional Corruption.
What is Institutional Corruption?
with Lawrence Lessig and Dennis Thompson
Panel Discussions:
Insights from Psychology
Institutional Corruption & Government and Law
Institutional Corruption & Medicine and Public Health
Institutional Corruption & Finance and Economics
Institutional Corruption & Academia and Nonprofits
Workshops
Innovations in Ethics Training
Effective Whistleblower Programs
Using Litigation to Combat Institutional Corruption
Institutional Corruption and Investigative Journalism
Banking Corruption: Are Emerging Reforms Sufficient?
Combating Corruption through Rating and Accreditation
The Commitment Scorecard
Featuring a keynote lecture by Francis Fukuyama
LINK http://ethics.harvard.edu/event/ending-institutional-corruption

-------------------------

Symposium: "Descartes and the Enlightenment
Friday, May 1
8:00a–6:00p
MIT, Building W20-491, 84 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Sponsored by the MIT Ben Franklin Project with the support of the Jack Miller Center, and the Templeton Foundation

Web site: http://cheme.scripts.mit.edu/bfranklin-project/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free - Online registration by April 17.
Sponsor(s): Chemical Engineering Department, MIT Benjamin Franklin Project
For more information, contact:  Daniel Adam Doneson
ddoneson@mit.edu 

-------------------------

HTC Symposium: Revisiting CASE: The Conference of Architects for the Study of the Environment
Friday, May 1
9:00a–6:00p
MIT, Building 7-429, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Symposium hosted by the History, Theory & Criticism of Art and Architecture Program, Department of Architecture, MIT.

MIT Architecture Lecture Series
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0
This event occurs daily through May 2, 2015.
Sponsor(s): History, Theory and Criticism of Architecture and Art, Department of Architecture
For more information, contact:  Anne Deveau
(617) 258-8438
adeveau@mit.edu

-------------------------

EAPS Thesis Defense ~ Strong Wind Events across Greenland's Coast and their Influences on the Ice Sheet, Sea Ice and Ocean
Friday, May 1
11:00a–12:00p
MIT, Building 54-823, (the tallest building on campus) and WHOI, Clark 271
Speaker: Marilena Oltmanns (by video link)
EAPS Thesis Defense | Strong Wind Events across Greenland's Coast and their Influences on the Ice Sheet, Sea Ice and Ocean

Web site: http://eapsweb.mit.edu/events
Open to: the general public
Cost: n/a
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Roberta Allard
617-253-3382

-------------------------

"Experiments in Environing: An Alternative History of Environmentalism"
Friday, May 1
2:30p–4:30p
MIT, Building E51-095, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Etienne Benson, Assistant Professor of History and Sociology of Science, University of Pennsylvania
Seminar in Environmental and Agricultural History

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): History Office
For more information, contact:  Margo Collett
617-253-4965
history-info@mit.edu 

-------------------------

Jazz on the Plaza
WHEN  Fri., May 1, 2015, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  The Plaza adjacent to the Science Center, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Art/Design, Concerts, Music, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Office for the Arts
SPEAKER(S)  Harvard Jazz Bands conducted by tenor saxophonist Don Braden ’85, with special guests Vijay Iyer, piano, and Ralph Peterson, Jr., drums
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO arts@fas.harvard.edu
LINK http://ofa.fas.harvard.edu/cal/details.php?ID=45391

----------------------------

Technovation 2015: Regional Pitch Night & Showcase
Friday, May 1
5:30 PM to 9:00 PM (EDT)
Microsoft NERD Center, 1 Memorial Drive, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/technovation-2015-regional-pitch-night-showcase-registration-16306305599

Come out to the Microsoft NERD Center in Cambridge and celebrate the locally-made apps submitted for the Technovation Challenge!

Up to 7 teams will be presenting their pitches, vying for for the local Technovation crown!

ALL registered teams are welcome to set up their posterboards and show off their apps prior to the pitch contest. The first hour of the event is devoted to all teams showing off their work in a gallery style presentation!
Teachers/coaches can sign up their teams for the gallery when registering.

All teams who take part in the posterboard gallery will be considered in the pre-selection process.The pre-selection process determines which teams will pitch to the judges on the night of the event, but the selections will not be announced until the night of the event.

ALL TEAMS SHOULD BE PREPARED TO PITCH!

Registration closes on Wednesday, April 29th at noon -- make sure to register today!

The winner of this event will proceed to the official Technovation semifinal round.
Technovation will select 10 teams from the semifinal round  to compete at the World Pitch Event in June.


This event is sponsored by the MassTLC Education Foundation, Microsoft, CHEN PR, CSTA, and a grant from Technovation.
---------------------
Saturday, May 2
---------------------

Wake Up the Earth Festival
Saturday, May 2
11am - 6 pm
Stony Brook Southewest Corridor Park, Jamaica Plain

More information at http://www.spontaneouscelebrations.org/

Editorial Comment:  Always a fine time for all.

-----------------------------

Ending Institutional Corruption
WHEN  Sat., May 2, 2015
WHERE  Harvard Law School, Milstein Conference Suite, Wasserstein Building,
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Business, Conferences, Education, Ethics, Exhibitions, Humanities, Law, Lecture, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics
SPEAKER(S)  Featuring:  Keynote Lecture by Francis Fukuyama
What is Institutional Corruption? with Lawrence Lessig and Dennis Thompson
Panels on fixing institutional corruption in government, law, academia, nonprofits, finance, economics, public health, medicine, journalism
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO katy@ethics.harvard.edu
DETAILS  A two day conference to celebrate the end of the Edmond J. Safra Lab on Institutional Corruption.
What is Institutional Corruption?
with Lawrence Lessig and Dennis Thompson
Panel Discussions:
Insights from Psychology
Institutional Corruption & Government and Law
Institutional Corruption & Medicine and Public Health
Institutional Corruption & Finance and Economics
Institutional Corruption & Academia and Nonprofits
Workshops
Innovations in Ethics Training
Effective Whistleblower Programs
Using Litigation to Combat Institutional Corruption
Institutional Corruption and Investigative Journalism
Banking Corruption: Are Emerging Reforms Sufficient?
Combating Corruption through Rating and Accreditation
The Commitment Scorecard
Featuring a keynote lecture by Francis Fukuyama
LINK http://ethics.harvard.edu/event/ending-institutional-corruption

--------------------------

HTC Symposium: Revisiting CASE: The Conference of Architects for the Study of the Environment
Saturday, May 2
9:00a–6:00p
MIT, 7-429, 77 Vassar Street, Cambridge

MIT Architecture Lecture Series

Symposium hosted by the History, Theory & Criticism of Art and Architecture Program, Department of Architecture, MIT.

Open to: the general public
Cost: 0
This event occurs daily through May 2, 2015.
Sponsor(s): History, Theory and Criticism of Architecture and Art, Department of Architecture
For more information, contact:  Anne Deveau
(617) 258-8438
adeveau@mit.edu
--------------------------

Point to Point Camp
Saturday, May 2
9am - 8pm
MIT Media Lab, Cambridge
RSVP at http://ptp.camp/#rsvp

Point to Point Camp, a one day unconference, will bring together technologists, journalists, and lawyers – plus academics who think about those topics – to advance the interests of privacy, transparency, and democracy in the 21st Century.

As an unconference, most of the day’s programming will be created by the conference attendees. Sessions can be skillshares, panel talks, trainings, presentations, or something else entirely.

What do lawyers, journalists, and technologists have to talk about?
how to design systems to avoid man-in-the-middle attacks
101s on data privacy law for journalists and technologists
seeing latent power dynamics inherent in laws and technologies
the best tools to increase your digital privacy
how to combine our efforts to maximize government transparency
how to code for inclusion and social justice
you tell us …
The event will provide ample time for hallway and barstool relationship building among experts in fields that are increasingly reliant on one another.


-------------------------

ARTS FIRST Performance Fair
WHEN  Sat., May 2, 2015, 1 – 5 p.m.
WHERE  12 venues in and around Harvard Yard
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Art/Design, Concerts, Dance, Music, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Presented by Office for the Arts at Harvard and Board of Overseers of Harvard College
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO arts@fas.harvard.edu, 617.495.8676
DETAILS  ARTS FIRST Performance Fair, over 100 public performances and presentations at twelve venues in and around Harvard Yard, including Global Arts and “Make Art” stations on the Science Center Plaza.
LINK http://ofa.fas.harvard.edu/cal/details.php?ID=45393

---------------------------

Climate Change Session
Saturday, May 2
3:00 PM to 5:00 PM (EDT)
The Arnold Arboretum, Leventritt Shrub and Vine Garden, 125 Arborway, Jamaica Plain

Keeping in Tune with the Environment: Palaver Strings is teaming up with The Arnold Arboretum and ImprovBoston to address the issue of climate change.  We are excited to present a program featuring Tchaikovsky's Souvenir de Florence and Scandinavian folk tunes, interspersed with speeches from climate change experts and improvised theater from fun-having experts.  We look forward to an event inspiring reflection and forward action to help make our world a brighter place.

---------------------------

Winning the Future:  The Struggle for Privacy and Democracy in the Information Age
Saturday, May 2
4:30PM
Bartos Auditorium, MIT Media Lab, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

A discussion withJulia Angwin, James Bamford, and Bruce Schneier
Moderated by Ahmed Ghappour

No registration is necessary for the PTP Keynote, which caps off our day of unconferencing with lawyers, journalists, and technologists at the MIT Media Lab.

-------------------
Sunday, May 3
-------------------

Urban and Suburban Carbon Farming to Reverse Global Warming
Sunday, May 3
9:00 AM to 5:00 PM (EDT)
Harvard, Science Center, Hall C, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/urban-and-suburban-carbon-farming-to-reverse-global-warming-registration-15352859817
Cost:  $11.54 - $53.74

Editorial Comment:  I know the organizers of this conference and went to their previous conference at Tufts last November.  This is not fantasy but a practical way of reversing global warming while improving soil and human health.  The only hopeful approach to turning the clock back on atmospheric carbon that I know of.
--------------------------

Earthfest
Sunday, May 3
11am - 5 pm
Esplanade and Hatch Shell, Boston

-------------------------

Somerville Growing Center’s Spring Garden Day
Sundan, May 3
12:30-2:30pm
Vinal Avenue, Somerville
 
-------------------------

Spring Forward: Stories and Music for a New Season
WHEN  Sun., May 3, 2015, 1 – 2:30 p.m.
WHERE  The Plaza adjacent to the Science Center, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Art/Design, Concerts, Dance, Music, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Presented by Office for the Arts at Harvard and Board of Overseers of Harvard College
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO arts@fas.harvard.edu, 617.495.8676
DETAILS  “Spring Forward: Stories and Music for a New Season,” featuring members of “The Sloth” storytelling group telling tales on the theme of “spring,” followed by a performance of Aaron Copland’s “Appalachian Spring” by the Eurydice Chamber Ensemble.
LINK http://ofa.fas.harvard.edu/cal/details.php?ID=45394

-------------------
Monday, May 4
-------------------

The Women Sheriffs of Wall Street: A Discussion with Elizabeth Warren, Sheila Bair, and Mary Schapiro
WHEN  Mon., May 4, 2015, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
WHERE  Memorial Church Sanctuary, Harvard Yard
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Business, Ethics, Law, Social Sciences, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR The Project on Public Narrative at Harvard's Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics
SPEAKER(S)  Senator Elizabeth Warren, Sheila Bair (former FDIC chairwoman), and Mary Schapiro (former SEC chairwoman). Ron Suskind (Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and director of the Project on Public Narrative) will be moderating.
COST  Free and open to the public; tickets required
TICKET WEB LINK  womensheriffs.eventbrite.com
TICKET INFO  Event is free and open to the public but you will need a ticket for entry. Early Bird tickets are available now for the Harvard community on Eventbrite!
CONTACT INFO jhendel@law.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Don't miss this truly historic event in which the women sheriffs of Wall Street will reflect on the role that gender played in financial reform and regulation - before, during, and after the Great Financial Crisis of 2007-8.
Tickets are required. Seating is first-come, first-served. Please arrive at least 15 minutes early for seating!
LINK https://www.facebook.com/events/397288070395897/

------------------------------

MASS Seminar - Suzana Camargo (Columbia)
Monday, May 4
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus)

Speaker: Suzana Camargo
MASS Seminar

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): MIT Atmospheric Science Seminars (MASS)
For more information, contact:  MASS organizing committee
mass@mit.edu 

-------------------------------

The Art of Crowdsourcing Everything
Monday, May 4
5:00p–6:00p
MIT, Building E15-341, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Lior Zoref, crowdsourcing researcher and author of "Mindsharing"
MIT Media Lab, MISTI MIT-Israel, Sloan Israeli Business Club and the Israeli Student Association present "The Art of Crowd Sourcing Everything" with Lior Zoref, crowdsourcing researcher and author of "Mindsharing"

This talk explains how we can use social media and the power of big crowds to upgrade our brains, our thinking, and our lives. Mindsharing shows us how to use technology to tap into a collective wisdom that has the power to transform every aspect of our life from finance to romance to family to career. From the prospective of a leading crowd wisdom researcher, author, a former Microsoft vice president and a passionate speaker, Lior Zoref will inspire you to think about the future of thinking in the era of social networks and crowd wisdom.
If the old saying is true that two brains are better than one, get ready to benefit from the power of fifty, five hundred, or five thousand brains.
About Lior Zoref:
Lior Zoref is an author, crowdsourcing researcher and international speaker. He worked for fourteen years at Microsoft, most recently as vice president of marketing for consumer and online services.

Please RSVP at the link below.

Web site: tinyurl.com/crowdsourcingrsvp
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Tickets: tinyurl.com/crowdsourcingrsvp
Sponsor(s): MISTI MIT-Israel Program, MIT Media Lab, Israeli Association, Sloan Israeli Business Club
For more information, contact:  Kylie Fisher
617-253-3938
kgfisher@mit.edu 

-----------------------------

The Outsider: book talk with author Patricia Gercik
Monday, May 4
5:30p–7:15p
MIT, Building E51-325, 70 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Patricia Gercik
Come hear Pat, former Program Director of MIT-Japan Program and Associate Director, of MISTI talk about her recently published novel, The Outsider set in the chaos of post-war Japan. Reception to follow book talk and book signing with sushi!

Web site: https://misti.mit.edu/outsider-book-talk-author-patricia-gercik
Open to: the general public
Cost: free
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies, MIT-Japan Program, MISTI
For more information, contact:  Christine Pilcavage
617-258-8208
csp18@mit.edu 

---------------------
Tuesday, May 5
---------------------

 Boston TechBreakfast
Tuesday, May 5
8:00 AM
Microsoft NERD - Horace Mann Room
1 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, MA (map)
Interact with your peers in a monthly morning breakfast meetup. At this monthly breakfast get-together techies, developers, designers, and entrepreneurs share learn from their peers through show and tell / show-case style presentations.
And yes, this is free! Thank our sponsors when you see them :)

Agenda for Boston TechBreakfast:
8:00 - 8:15 - Get yer Bagels & Coffee and chit-chat
8:15 - 8:20 - Introductions, Sponsors, Announcements
8:20 - ~9:30 - Showcases and Shout-Outs!
GeoOrbital: GeoOrbital Wheel - Michael Burtov
Ulula - Antoine Heuty
Cospan Design: Nysa - David McCoy
Shelfie - CJ Acosta
~9:30 - end - Final "Shout Outs" & Last Words  Boston TechBreakfast Sponsors

-----------------------------

The 10th Annual Plant Biology Initiative Symposium:  "From Leaves to Ecosystems: Plants in a Changing World”
Tuesday, May 5 and Wednesday May 6
Arnold Arboretum, Weld Hill Research Building, 1300 Centre Street, Boston
RSVP at http://hwpi.harvard.edu/pbi/

Please save May 5th and 6th for the 10th Annual Harvard Plant Biology Initiative Symposium: "From Leaves to Ecosystems: Plants in a Changing World”. This year the Symposium is being co-sponsored by HUCE.

This year’s symposium will kick off with a special lecture on May 5th by Chris Field, Carnegie Institution for Science, at 4:00PM in the Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford St., Cambridge, MA. The title of Chris’s talk is, "Understanding, Managing, and Reducing the Risks of Climate Change”.  There will be a reception for faculty, and the Symposium speakers, in HUCE following the lecture.

On May 6th, we will hold a full-day symposium from 8:45AM – 5:30PM at the Arnold Arboretum's Weld Hill Research Building, 1300 Centre St., Boston, MA.  The symposium will wrap up with a panel discussion, with remarks by Harvard Plant Biology faculty. There will be a reception at the end of the symposium.

Confirmed speakers:
Carol Augspurger, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Joe Berry, Carnegie Institution of Washington
Zoe Cardon, Marine Biological Laboratory
Todd E. Dawson, University of California at Berkeley
Jim Ehleringer, The University of Utah
Graham Farquhar, Australian National University
Christian Körner, Institute of Botany, University of Basel
Beverly Law, Oregon State University
Joy Ward, The University of Kansas

Because we are providing lunch on May 6, we are asking everyone who will attend - faculty and students included - to pre-register. To learn more about the symposium and to register, please visit the PBI Website:  http://hwpi.harvard.edu/pbi 

Contact Name:
pbi@fas.harvard.edu
http://hwpi.harvard.edu/pbi/contact-pbi

------------------------

EAPS Thesis Defense ~ Variability of the Polar Stratospheric Vortex and its Impact on Surface Climate Patterns
Tuesday, May 5
3:30p–4:30p
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus)

Speaker: Aditi Sheshadri

Web site: http://eapsweb.mit.edu
Open to: the general public
Cost: n/a
Sonsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Roberta Allard
617-253-3381
------------------------

PBI Special Lecture: Understanding, Managing, and Reducing the Risks of Climate Change
WHEN  Tue., May 5, 2015, 4 – 5 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Environmental Sciences, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Harvard Plant Biology Initiative
SPEAKER(S)  Chris Field, Carnegie Institution for Science
COST  Free and open to the public
TICKET WEB LINK  http://hwpi.harvard.edu/pbi/register
LINK http://hwpi.harvard.edu/pbi/schedule

-----------------------

Why We Should Trust Science: Perspectives from the History & Philosophy of Science
Tuesday, May 5
4:00p–5:30p
MIT, E51-115, Wong Auditorium, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Naomi Oreskes, Harvard
2015 Arthur Miller Lecture on Science and Ethics

The annual Arthur Miller Lecture on Science and Ethics is funded by the family of MIT alumnus Arthur Miller (B.S., 1934; Ph.D., 1938), this lecture provides an opportunity to present issues of science and ethics to the larger MIT community.

Web site: web.mit.edu/sts
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): HASTS, SHASS Dean's Office
For more information, contact:  Randyn Miller
617-253-3452
randyn@mit.edu 

------------------------

Climate Resilient Financing
Tuesday, May 5
5:30 PM to 7:00 PM (EDT)
Goulston & Storrs, 400 Atlantic Avenue, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/climate-resilient-financing-tickets-16469473639

Thanks to the tremendous work of nearly 350 entrants to the Boston Living with Water design competition, we now have a far better understanding of how climate resilient design can help Boston prepare for increased coastal flooding.

What also became clear is that Boston is looking at a third round--after the Big Dig and Harbor cleanup--of major public and private investment in the city's built environment to prevent widespread flooding in the 1/3 of the city that lies within eight feet of today's high tide.

How and who will pay for this?  How much of this investment will be public and how much can we count on, incentivize, or require private investment?  What’s the role of insurance? How do we make sure investment is equitable, to prevent islands of protected properties surrounded by flooded neighborhoods?

Join Matt Kiefer, real estate lawyer with Goulston and Storrs, for a panel discussion with experts on residential, commercial and infrastructure preparedness financing and insurance.  We look forward to a lively, hopeful conversation focused on maintaining and enhancing Boston's economic and social vibrancy. See you there!

------------------------

Architecture Lecture / HTC Forum: Basile Baudez, "Drawing for the Prize: Architectural Competition Drawings from Europe to America"
Tuesday, May 5
6:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building 7-429, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Basile Baudez
MIT Architecture Lecture Series
Part of the Spring 2015 Department of Architecture Lecture Series

Hosted by the HTC Forum, History, Theory and Criticism of Architecture and Art Program

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Sponsor(s): History, Theory and Criticism of Architecture and Art, Department of Architecture
For more information, contact:  Anne Simunovic
617-253-4412
annesim@mit.edu 

------------------------


BASG May 5th: Population with Alan Weisman, Author of Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth?
Boston Area Sustainability Group
Tuesday, May 5
6:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Cambridge Innovation Center, Venture Cafe - 5th Floor, One Broadway, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/basg-may-5th-population-with-alan-weisman-author-of-countdown-our-last-best-hope-for-a-future-on-tickets-16504403114
Cost:  $8 - $10

Population is undoubtedly a root cause of climate change, but it is also the third rail of sustainability. The statistic of human's exponential growth is oft cited to introduce the topic of sustainability and to invite consideration of what changes we might make to accommodate one million more of us every 4 1/2 days on the planet. Rarely though do we delve deeper into the topic to understand the historical, political, religious, and cultural circumstances that incentivize continued growth, even as current events suggest reducing numbers may be in our own best interest. For our May 5th event, the Boston Area Sustainability Group (BASG) brings acclaimed journalist and author, Alan Weisman, to lead us on an important global exploration and intimate discussion of the future of humanity.

About Alan Weisman
Journalist Alan Weisman has worked in more than 50 countries and on all seven continents. His reports from around the world have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Atlantic Monthly, Harper's, The Los Angeles Times Magazine, Vanity Fair, Mother Jones, Discover, Orion, Wilson Quarterly, and on National Public Radio. His latest book is Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope for a Future on Earth? (Little, Brown and Company, 2013, and in 13 foreign language editions). Countdown was awarded the Los Angeles Times Book Prize, the Paris Book Festival Prize for Nonfiction, the Nautilus Gold Book Award, the Population Institute’s Global Media Award for Best Book, and was a finalist for the Orion Prize and the Books for a Better Life Award. 

His previous book, The World Without Us, an international bestseller translated into 34 languages, was named Best Nonfiction Book of 2007 by Time Magazine and Entertainment Weekly, and was the iTunes #1 Nonfiction Audiobook. It was also winner of the Wenjin Book Prize of the National Library of China, and a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Rachel Carson Prize, the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize, and the Orion Book Prize.

His other books include An Echo In My Blood; Gaviotas: A Village to Reinvent the World; and La Frontera: The United States Border With Mexico.  He is a senior documentary writer and producer for Homelands Productions, and lives in western Massachusetts with his wife, sculptor Beckie Kravetz.

************
--------------
Opportunity
--------------
************

The Boston Network for International Development (BNID) maintains a website (BNID.org) that serves as a clearing-house for information on organizations, events, and jobs related to international development in the Boston area. BNID has played an important auxiliary role in fostering international development activities in the Boston area, as witnessed by the expanding content of the site and a significant growth in the number of users.

The website contains:

A calendar of Boston area events and volunteer opportunities related to International Development
- http://www.bnid.org/events
A jobs board that includes both internships and full time positions related to International Development that is updated daily - http://www.bnid.org/jobs
A directory and descriptions of more than 250 Boston-area organizations - http://www.bnid.org/organizations

Also, please sign up for our weekly newsletter (we promise only one email per week) to get the most up-to-date information on new job and internship opportunities -www.bnid.org/sign-up

The website is completely free for students and our goal is to help connect students who are interested in international development with many of the worthwhile organizations in the area.

Please feel free to email our organization at info@bnid.org if you have any questions!

———————————

Intern with Biodiversity for a Livable Climate!
Biodiversity for a Livable Climate (BLC) is a nonprofit based in the Cambridge, MA area. Our mission is to mobilize the biosphere to restore ecosystems and reverse global warming.
Education, public information campaigns, organizing, scientific investigation, collaboration with like-minded organizations, research and policy development are all elements of our strategy.

Background: Soils are the largest terrestrial carbon sink on the planet. Restoring the complex ecology of soils is the only way to safely and quickly remove carbon from the atmosphere and store it in the ground, where it’s desperately needed to regenerate the health of billions of acres of degraded lands. Restoring carbon to soils and regenerating ecosystems are how we can restore a healthy hydrologic cycle and cool local and planetary climates safely, naturally, and in time to ensure a livable climate now and in the future.

Our Work: immediate plans include
Organizing the First International Biodiversity, Soil Carbon and Climate Week, October 31-November 9, 2014, and a kick-off conference in the Boston area, “Mobilizing the Biosphere to Reverse Global Warming: A Biodiversity, Water, Soil Carbon and Climate Conference – and Call to Action” to expand the mainstream climate conversation to include the power of biology, and to help initiate intensive worldwide efforts to return atmospheric carbon to the soils.
Coordination of a global fund to directly assist local farmers and herders in learning and applying carbon farming approaches that not only benefit the climate, but improve the health and productivity of the land and the people who depend on it.
Collaboration with individuals and organizations on addressing eco-restoration and the regeneration of water and carbon cycles; such projects may include application of practices such as Holistic Management for restoration of billions of acres of degraded grasslands, reforestation of exploited forest areas, and restoring ocean food chains.

Please contact Helen D. Silver, helen.silver@bio4climate.org for further information.
781-316-1710
Bio4climate.org
SharedHarvestCSA.com

—————————————

Climate Stories Project
http://www.climatestoriesproject.org

What's your Climate Story?
Climate Stories Project is a forum that gives a voice to the emotional and personal impacts that climate change is having on our lives. Often, we only discuss climate change from the impersonal perspective of science or the contentious realm of politics. Today, more and more of us are feeling the effects of climate change on an personal level. Climate Stories Project allows people from around the world to share their stories and to engage with climate change in a personal, direct way.

———————————

Where is the best yogurt on the planet made? Somerville, of course!

Join the Somerville Yogurt Making Cooperative and get a weekly quart of the most thick, creamy, rich and tart yogurt in the world. Membership in the coop costs $2.50 per quart. Members share the responsibility for making yogurt in our kitchen located just outside of Davis Sq. in FirstChurch.  No previous yogurt making experience is necessary.

For more information checkout.
https://sites.google.com/site/somervilleyogurtcoop/home

---------------------

Cambridge Residents: Free Home Thermal Images

Have you ever wanted to learn where your home is leaking heat by having an energy auditor come to your home with a thermal camera?  With that info you then know where to fix your home so it's more comfortable and less expensive to heat.  However, at $200 or so, the cost of such a thermal scan is a big chunk of change.

HEET Cambridge has now partnered with Sagewell, Inc. to offer Cambridge residents free thermal scans.

Sagewell collects the thermal images by driving through Cambridge in a hybrid vehicle equipped with thermal cameras.  They will scan every building in Cambridge (as long as it's not blocked by trees or buildings or on a private way).  Building owners can view thermal images of their property and an analysis online. The information is password protected so that only the building owner can see the results.

Homeowners, condo-owners and landlords can access the thermal images and an accompanying analysis free of charge. Commercial building owners and owners of more than one building will be able to view their images and analysis for a small fee.

The scans will be analyzed in the order they are requested.

Go to Sagewell.com.  Type in your address at the bottom where it says "Find your home or building" and press return.  Then click on "Here" to request the report.

That's it.  When the scans are done in a few weeks, your building will be one of the first to be analyzed. The accompanying report will help you understand why your living room has always been cold and what to do about it.

With knowledge, comes power (or in this case saved power and money, not to mention comfort).

---------------------

Free solar electricity analysis for MA residents
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dHhwM202dDYxdUZJVGFscnY1VGZ3aXc6MQ

-----------------------

HEET has partnered with NSTAR and Mass Save participating contractor Next Step Living to deliver no-cost Home Energy Assessments to Cambridge residents.

During the assessment, the energy specialist will:

Install efficient light bulbs (saving up to 7% of your electricity bill)
Install programmable thermostats (saving up to 10% of your heating bill)
Install water efficiency devices (saving up to 10% of your water bill)
Check the combustion safety of your heating and hot water equipment
Evaluate your home’s energy use to create an energy-efficiency roadmap
If you get electricity from NSTAR, National Grid or Western Mass Electric, you already pay for these assessments through a surcharge on your energy bills. You might as well use the service.

Please sign up at http://nextsteplivinginc.com/heet/?outreach=HEET or call Next Step Living at 866-867-8729.  A Next Step Living Representative will call to schedule your assessment.

HEET will help answer any questions and ensure you get all the services and rebates possible.

(The information collected will only be used to help you get a Home Energy Assessment.  We won’t keep the data or sell it.)

(If you have any questions or problems, please feel free to call HEET’s Jason Taylor at 617 441 0614.)

*********
-----------
Resource
-----------
*********

Sustainable Business Network Local Green Guide

SBN is excited to announce the soft launch of its new Local Green Guide, Massachusetts' premier Green Business Directory!

To view the directory please visit: http://www.localgreenguide.org
To find out how how your business can be listed on the website or for sponsorship opportunities please contact Adritha at adritha@sbnboston.org

--------------------------------------------------

Free Monthly Energy Analysis

CarbonSalon is a free service that every month can automatically track your energy use and compare it to your past energy use (while controlling for how cold the weather is). You get a short friendly email that lets you know how you’re doing in your work to save energy.

https://www.carbonsalon.com/

---------------------------------------

Boston Food System

"The Boston Food System [listserv] provides a forum to post announcements of events, employment opportunities, internships, programs, lectures, and other activities as well as related articles or other publications of a non-commercial nature covering the area's food system - food, nutrition, farming, education, etc. - that take place or focus on or around Greater Boston (broadly delineated)."

The Boston area is one of the most active nationwide in terms of food system activities - projects, services, and events connected to food, farming, nutrition - and often connected to education, public health, environment, arts, social services and other arenas.   Hundreds of organizations and enterprises cover our area, but what is going on week-to-week is not always well publicized.
Hence, the new Boston Food System listserv, as the place to let everyone know about these activities.  Specifically:
Use of the BFS list will begin soon, once we get a decent base of subscribers.  Clarification of what is appropriate to announce and other posting guidelines will be provided as well.

It's easy to subscribe right now at https://elist.tufts.edu/wws/subscribe/bfs

----------------------

Artisan Asylum  http://artisansasylum.com/

Sprout & Co:  Community Driven Investigations  http://thesprouts.org/

Greater Boston Solidarity Economy Mapping Project  http://www.transformationcentral.org/solidarity/mapping/mapping.html
a project by Wellesley College students that invites participation, contact jmatthaei@wellesley.edu

------------------------

Bostonsmart.com's Guide to Boston  http://www.bostonsmarts.com/BostonGuide/

********************************************
-----------------------------------------------------

Links to events at 60 colleges and universities at Hubevents   http://hubevents.blogspot.com

Thanks to

Fred Hapgood's Selected Lectures on Science and Engineering in the Boston Area:  http://www.BostonScienceLectures.com

MIT Events:  http://events.mit.edu

MIT Energy Club:  http://mitenergyclub.org/calendar

Harvard Events:  http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/harvard-events/events-calendar/

Harvard Environment:  http://www.environment.harvard.edu/events/calendar/

Sustainability at Harvard:  http://green.harvard.edu/events

Mass Climate Action:  http://www.massclimateaction.net/calendar/events/index.php

Meetup:  http://www.meetup.com/

Eventbrite:  http://www.eventbrite.com/

Microsoft NERD Center:  http://microsoftcambridge.com/Events/

Startup and Entrepreneurial Events:   http://www.greenhornconnect.com/events/

Cambridge Civic Journal:  http://www.rwinters.com

Cambridge Happenings:  http://cambridgehappenings.org

Cambridge Community Calendar:  https://www.cctvcambridge.org/calendar

Boston Area Computer User Groups:  http://www.bugc.org/

Arts and Cultural Events List:  http://aacel.blogspot.com/

Boston Events Insider:  http://bostoneventsinsider.com/boston_events/

Nerdnite:  http://boston.nerdnite.com/