Sunday, November 16, 2014

Energy (and Other) Events - November 16, 2014

Energy (and Other) Events is a weekly mailing list published most Sundays covering events around the Cambridge, MA and greater Boston area that catch the editor's eye.

Hubevents  http://hubevents.blogspot.com is the web version.

If you wish to subscribe or unsubscribe to Energy (and Other) Events email gmoke@world.std.com

What I Do and Why I Do It:  The Story of Energy (and Other) Events
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com/2013/11/what-i-do-and-why-i-do-it.html

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Event Index - full Event Details available below the Index

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Monday, November 17
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10am  Free Admission Day Harvard Museums
11:30am  Design Thinking: Fail Faster to Grow Your Business
12pm  Mothers Out Front:  Standout for a  Livable Future - every day until Friday, November 21
12pm  MASS Seminar - Jun-Eung Lee, Brown
12pm  Financing wind energy deployment in China through the Clean Development Mechanism: Additionality and incentives for technological change
12:15pm  "Regulating Microbial Ecologies: Policy and Practice in Artisanal Cheesemaking”
12:15pm  Deproliferation Dynamics: Why States Give Up Nuclear Weapons Programs
12:30pm  "insel4D: Dynamic Simulation of Cities”
1pm  Webinar: Resilience Circles - Small Groups for Learning, Mutual Aid, and Social Action
2:30pm  How Do Electricity Shortages Affect Productivity? Evidence from India
3pm   Thrive Energy Technologies
3pm  Assessing the Pandemic Potential of the Ebola West Africa Outbreak
4pm  Access to Toilets and Women's Rights
4pm  Implications of the Bubble Economy
4pm  Youth City Council Hearing on Divestment
4:15pm  Divining for the Environment: An Ifá Response to the Environmental Crisis
4:30pm  Planets and Life Series: Welcome to the Anthropocene, Climate Change and Hurricanes
5:30pm  Social Entrepreneurs and the Role of Foundations
6pm  Conflict, Convivencia, and the Life of Buildings
6pm  Meet and mingle with Christopher Ahlberg, world leading Swedish information entrepreneur
6pm  MIT Water Innovation Prize - Idea Pitch & Dinner
6:30pm  Mayor Walsh's Civic Academy
7pm  EARTH A New Wild Screening

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Tuesday, November 18
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12pm  Jeffrey Goldberg, National Correspondent, The Atlantic
12pm  FAA Deputy Administrator to Speak about NextGen's Impact on Transportation and the Economy
12pm  Urban Agriculture in Boston
12pm  Bundle Up! game and relationship of architecture to ecology
1pm  Career Insights on FEMA, HUD, and the PMF Process
1:30pm  Business Consulting for Survival Entrepreneurs in Slums and Townships
3:15pm  Mountebanks, Con-Men, and Heretics: An Epistemology of Scientific Crackpottery
4:30pm  "The Roots of Technological Controvery: Genetically Modified Crops in Africa.”
4:30pm  Kremlin propaganda: can Putin control it?
4:30pm  "Anthropology in Warzones”
5:30pm  Modern War Gardens: Paradise Lost
5:30pm  e4Dev Speaker Series: Revolution of the kitchen--social processes of adoption of improved and removal of traditional cookstoves
6pm  Protecting the Ash Tree: Wabanaki Diplomacy and Sustainability Science in Maine
6pm  Food of the Future, Future of Food
6pm  Cryptocurrencies: The Challenges and Opportunities Ahead
6pm  Boston New Technology November 2014 Product Showcase #BNT47
6:30pm  Creating Public Doubt about Scientific Facts
6:30pm  Josef Albers: Minimal Means, Maximum Effect
6:30pm  What will the Power Grid Look Like 50 Years From Now?
7pm  Innovations in Wind Energy Lecture Series: Cape Wind
7pm  Codebreaker: A Special Screening and Q&A
8pm  Human Space Travel: Where Have We Been? Where are We Going?

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Wednesday, November 19
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7:30am  November Boston Sustainability Breakfast
12pm  Are Failing Bees Our Warning Sign? An HLS Green Team Talk with Dr. Alex Lu
12pm  Building Food System 6.0 with Paul Matteucci
12pm  Frederick W. Mayer: Narrative Politics - The Medium is the Story
12pm  National Security and Double Government with Professors Michael Glennon and Stephen Walt
12pm  The Nuclear Deadline:  The Iranian Negotiations: Possible Outcomes and Implications
12pm  The Organization of Violence and Rebel Behavior
1pm  The Changing Mindset of Arab Youth from the Prism of Opinion Surveys
2:15pm  Monetization of Eastern Mediterranean Energy Assets
4pm  Collective Decisions by Preference aggregation: Between Artificial Intelligence and Social Choice
5:30pm  Exploring Global Prosperity: Legatum Prosperity Index
6pm  Environmental Film Screening & Discussion of "Extreme Realities: The Link Between Severe Weather, Climate Change, and Our National Security”
6pm  Green Exchange: Sustainable Innovation
6pm  Cambridge’s Getting to Net Zero Task Force
6pm  Designing the Food System of the Future
6:30pm  Constructed Atmospheres:  Architecture as Meteorological Design
7pm  Music Brings the Civil Rights Movement to Harvard Square
7pm  The Physics of Evolution: Equations shed new light on nature's mysteries

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Thursday, November 20
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12pm  Climate Change on Trial: The Lobster Boat Blockade
12pm  Assessing the Policies of Oil Rich States of the Gulf toward Development: Growth vs. Merit
3pm  Bad Economic Ideas—and Their Consequences
3pm  "Softening War? Sociocultural Knowledge, Military Strategy, and the Experience of Human Terrain Teams in Iraq and Afghanistan”
4pm  From Ocean to Amazon: Our Human Story in Nature
4pm  Ebola: Reporting on and Responding to an Evolving Outbreak
6pm  The Politics of Displacement in the American City: A Conversation with Two Documentary Filmmakers
6pm  Relativity, Quantum Physics, and Graphene
6pm  Earthos Conversation Series Topic #6 BIODIVERSITY
6:15pm  “The Electric Car Vehicle/Driver Interface; the BMW i3 and other new cars”
6:30pm  The Birth of a Nation
6:30pm  Design as Survival, Resistance, and Transformative Action
6:30pm  NEXPO: Northeastern’s Entrepreneurship Exposition
7pm  Things That Go Bump in the Night: What Do Whales See?

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Friday, November 21
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9am  New England Electricity Restructuring Roundtable Presents:
Gas Supply & Electricity Rates; and The Future of Demand Response
9am  The Road Ahead: Forum of Future Cities
12pm  Cultural Survival Bazaar
12pm  Cloud, Fog and the Maintenance of Ecosystems: Mist Connections
12pm  Transnational Homeland Security?
1pm  IACS Seminar: Part 1: "Tree-like Structure in Social and Information Networks" & Part 2: "Data-mining for development”
2pm  Global Convergences: Strategies Against Evictions & Displacement
3pm  "Energy and the Industrial Revolution: Past, Present, and Future”
5pm  Growth in Alternative Fuel Vehicles and Solar Markets
6pm  Restoring Ecosystems to Reverse Global Warming

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Monday, November 24
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11am  Too Big To Fail or Too Hard to Remember: Lessons from the New Deal and the Triumph, Tragedy, and Lost Legacy of James M. Landis
12pm  MASS Seminar - Giuseppe Torri (Harvard)
12pm  Panel discussion: Carbon Capture and Sequestration: Obstacles and Possibilities
12:15pm  "Economics Inside the Grid: Smart Grids, Power Systems Engineering, and Emergent Markets”
2:30pm  Imperfect Markets versus Imperfect Regulation in U.S. Electricity Generation
4:30pm  Planets and Life:  Welcome to the Anthropocene, The Human Palate for Energy, Land, and Water Under Global Change: What and Where are the Risks?
6pm  Hope for a Livable Climate:  The Promise of Restorative Grazing to Regenerate Soil and Reverse Global Warming
7pm  regenarratives

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Tuesday, November 25
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12:30pm  Unpacking open data: power, politics and the influence of infrastructures
6pm  Food on the Rails: The Golden Era of Railroad Dining
7pm  Film Screening: ART21 "Secrets" (2014)

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My rough notes on some of the events I go to and notes on books I’ve read are at:
http://hubeventsnotes.blogspot.com

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Monday, November 17
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Free Admission Day Harvard Museums
WHEN  Mon., Nov. 17, 2014, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Art Museums, 32 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Art/Design, Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Harvard Art Museums
COST  Free
TICKET WEB LINK  http://www.harvardartmuseums.org/visit/calendar/free-admission-day
TICKET INFO  Timed-ticket reservations are required.
DETAILS  In celebration of the public opening of the new Harvard Art Museums, free admission is being extended to the public on Monday, November 17 and Tuesday, November 18.*
The new galleries include masterpieces from the collections of the Fogg, Busch-Reisinger, and Arthur M. Sackler Museums, with works of art dating from ancient times to the present, including paintings, sculpture, ceramics, drawings, and photographs from the Americas, Europe, North Africa, the Mediterranean, and Asia. Also on view is the inaugural special exhibition, Mark Rothko’s Harvard Murals.
*This event is free and open to the public. Timed-ticket reservations are required. Reserve tickets online at harvardartmuseums.org/calendar.
LINK http://www.harvardartmuseums.org/visit/calendar/free-admission-day

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Design Thinking: Fail Faster to Grow Your Business
Tuesday, November 18
11:30 am - 1:30 pm
Northeastern, Curry Student Center Room 333, 346 Huntington Avenue,  Boston

Presented by Scout, this panel will combine the interests of student moderators with the expertise of design thinking professionals from innovative, thought-leading firms. It will explore the overall concept of design thinking and how it applies to real business challenges, taking a deeper dive into what the engagement between client and firm looks like—‘rabbitholes’ they’ve seen, experiences working with an interdisciplinary team, etc.

Website:  http://www.northeastern.edu/eweek/blog/tuesday/design-thinking/
Organizer: Northeastern University Center for Entrepreneurship Education
Website:   http://www.northeastern.edu/entrepreneurship/

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Mothers Out Front:  Standout for a  Livable Future
Monday - Friday, 11/17 - 11/21
Noon - 1pm
MA State House, Boston

Help ask Governor Patrick to make MA the first state in the country to meet all its new energy needs with clean, renewable energy, drawing the line on fossil fuels. There is a different theme each day, ending with a Climate Crossroads, Climate Choice Rally on Friday that includes a violin performance! For more information at http://www.mothersoutfront.org/power_up_at_the_state_house

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MASS Seminar - Jun-Eung Lee, Brown
Monday, November 17
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus)

Speaker: Jun-Eung Lee

MIT Atmospheric Science Seminar
The MIT Atmospheric Science Seminar (MASS) is a student-run weekly seminar series within PAOC. Seminar topics include all research concerning the atmosphere and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars usually take place on Monday from 12-1pm followed by a lunch with graduate students. Besides the seminar, individual meetings with professors, post-docs, and students are arranged. The seminar series is run by graduate students and is intended mainly for students to interact with individuals outside the department, but faculty and post docs certainly participate.

Web site: http://eaps-www.mit.edu/paoc/events/calendars/mass
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): MIT Atmospheric Science Seminars
For more information, contact:  MASS organizing committee
mass@mit.edu

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Financing wind energy deployment in China through the Clean Development Mechanism: Additionality and incentives for technological change
Monday, November 17
12pm-1:30pm
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, HKS, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Gabe Chan, Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group
Joern Huenteler, Research Fellow, Energy Technology Innovation Policy research group

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"Regulating Microbial Ecologies: Policy and Practice in Artisanal Cheesemaking"
Monday, November  17
12:15 pm - 2:00 pm
Harvard, Room 100F, Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Heather Paxson, MIT, Anthropology
Abstract:   Cheese is a fermented food, alive with bacteria, yeasts and molds whose metabolic activity generates the aromas, flavors and textures that account for an enormous diversity of cheese types. Yet, as a microbial ecosystem, cheese can also host pathogenic organisms whose presence can pose public health risks. Regulating the diverse microbial ecologies of cheese production to promote public health and safety is no straightforward task. For much of the 20th century, the microbiopolitics of cheese in the U.S. presupposed and promoted industrial methods and standards. Over the past four decades, however, domestic interest in producing and consuming artisanally made cheese has risen dramatically. This paper will report on recent regulatory battles over the health and safety of domestic (and imported) artisanal cheese. At issue in these debates are ideas about the nature of milk, the validity and efficacy of technoscientific v. "traditional" methods and equipment, understandings of what cheese is, the appropriate role of federal government, and international trade politics.

Biography:   Heather Paxson is Professor of Anthropology and Director of Graduate Studies for the HASTS program at MIT. Her recently taught courses include "Art, Craft, Science," "Food, Culture and Politics" and "Rethinking the Family." Heather's second book, The Life of Cheese: Crafting Food and Value in America (University of California, 2013), draws on 8 years of episodic ethnographic fieldwork among artisanal cheesemakers, cheesemongers and dairy scientists in the United States (centered in New England, Wisconsin and northern California). The Life of Cheese won the 2014 Diana Forsythe Prize from the Committee on the Anthropology of Science, Technology and Computing and the Society for the Anthropology of Work. Heather received her PhD from Stanford University and taught at Stanford, NYU, Princeton, CUNY and Pitzer College before coming to MIT.

A complete list of STS Circle at Harvard events can be found on our website:
http://www.hks.harvard.edu/sts/events/sts_circle/

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Deproliferation Dynamics: Why States Give Up Nuclear Weapons Programs
WHEN  Mon., Nov. 17, 2014, 12:15 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Nye A, 5th Floor, Taubman Building, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR International Security Program
SPEAKER(S)  Rupal Mehta, Stanton Nuclear Security Postdoctoral Fellow, International Security Program/Project on Managing the Atom
CONTACT INFO susan_lynch@harvard.edu
LINK http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/events/6502/deproliferation_dynamics.html

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"insel4D: Dynamic Simulation of Cities"
Monday, November 17
12:30p–2:00p
MIT, Building 7-429, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Ursula Eicker, Professor, HFT Stuttgart Centre for Sustainable Energy Technology
Architecture Lecture Series / Building Technology Lecture Series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Department of Architecture
For more information, contact:  Anne Simunovic
617-253-4412
annesim@mit.edu

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Webinar: Resilience Circles - Small Groups for Learning, Mutual Aid, and Social Action
Tuesday, November 18
1pm ET
RSVP at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8127522144892632322

Join this webinar to learn how small groups of 8 - 15 people can form Resilience Circles for learning, mutual aid and social action.  Circles are
a great way to form community, build resilience, and have fun!

Unemployment and a tough economy are affecting millions of people. Many of us are worried about our financial security, threats to the environment,
and more.

Our challenges are made worse by a culture of isolation and disconnection.  The skills we need to build community do not come as naturally as they
once did. We can’t afford to be disconnected, because isolated individuals cannot create lasting social change. It?s up to networked communities to do
that.

That’s part of why people have been forming small "Resilience Circles” and affinity groups of 8 - 15 people.  These groups are exploring a new kind of
security based in mutual aid and community support.

Join us on this webinar to hear stories from two Resilience Circles:
Carrie Sonnenborn - near Denver, CO
Matthew Mosher - Three Rivers, MI

Carrie and Matthew will share lessons and stories from their Circles. We’ll also hear from Sarah Byrnes, the coordinator of the Resilience Circles
Network.

Register at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/8127522144892632322
Read more Resilience Circles and Affinity Groups:
How to Win Friends and Influence the New Economy
https://www.opendemocracy.net/transformation/sarah-byrnes/how-to-win-friends-and-influence-new-economy
For Real Change, Conversations Not Debates
http://www.commondreams.org/views/2012/10/04/real-change-conversations-not-debates
How Small Groups Can Power Big Change
http://www.yesmagazine.org/blogs/common-security-clubs/how-small-grops-can-power-big-change
Learning to Live on Less
http://www.yesmagazine.org/blogs/common-security-clubs/learning-to-live-on-less

Sarah Byrnes
Institute for Policy Studies, New England Office
412.953.6405 (cell)
http://netransition.org

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How Do Electricity Shortages Affect Productivity? Evidence from India
Monday, November 17
2:30p–4:00p
MIT, Building E62-450, 100 Main Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Allan Collard-Wexler (Duke University)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): IO Workshop
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal@mit.edu

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Thrive Energy Technologies
Monday Nov. 17
3-4pm
MIT, Building E19-307, 400 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1yeoqXGAz3ng8frh8nfv8bheG38iynIn_63qr5fBIkwY/viewform

Dr. Ranga Bodavala, founder of Thrive Energy Technologies, which pioneers the development and deployment of portable solar LED home lights in India, Africa, and Latin America through continuous improvements in materials, cost reduction, improved functional benefits and financial modeling. Dr. Bodavala will speak on technology, entrepreneurship and issues of poverty as it relates to technology-based solutions in business models.

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Assessing the Pandemic Potential of the Ebola West Africa Outbreak
Monday, November 17
3:00pm to 4:00pm
Harvard, The Brooks Room, Pierce 213, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Prof. Alessandro Vespignani, Northeastern University
Mathematical and computational models have gained importance in the public-health domain, especially in infectious disease epidemiology, by providing quantitative analysis in support of the policy-making processes. In this lecture I will focus on the analysis  of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa. I will present the methodological approach in integrating heterogenous data sources, the accuracy provided by different levels of data-integration, the problem of real-time estimation of parameters, and the validation through high quality data sets of the computational models.  I will also present short term projections of the epidemic in West Africa and an assessment of the international spreading risk.

Applied Mathematics Colloquia

Contact: Arlene Stevens
Email: astevens@seas.harvard.edu

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Access to Toilets and Women's Rights
WHEN  Mon., Nov. 17, 2014, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, CGIS South, S354, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Art/Design, Health Sciences, Humanities, Law, Religion, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Harvard South Asia Institute
SPEAKER(S)  Sharmila Murthy, assistant professor of Law, Suffolk University
Ramnath Subbaraman, PUKAR; research fellow in medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital
LINK http://southasiainstitute.harvard.edu/event/access-to-toilets-and-womens-rights/

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Implications of the Bubble Economy
Monday, November 17
4:00 PM to 5:30 PM (EST)
Tufts, Mugar 231, 160 Packard Avenue, Medford
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/implications-of-the-bubble-economy-tickets-14209469907

The global economy has become increasingly, perhaps chronically, unstable. Since 2008, we have heard about the housing bubble, subprime mortgages, banks "too big to fail," financial regulation (or the lack of it), and the European debt crisis. What we haven't heard much about is the role of natural resources–energy in particular–as drivers of economic growth, or the connection of "global warming" to the economic crisis.  Robert Ayres, an economist and physicist, will discuss his new book, which connects economic instability to the economics of energy. Ayres’ talk will describe the roots of our bubble economy and offer a new approach to economic growth.

Robert U. Ayres is a physicist and economist, currently Novartis professor emeritus of economics, political science and technology management at the international business school INSEAD, in France. He is noted for his work on technological forecasting, life cycle assessment, mass-balance accounting, energy efficiency and the role of thermodynamics in economic growth. 

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Youth City Council Hearing on Divestment
Monday, November 17
4:00pm*
Boston City Hall, 5th Floor Council Chamber

Come take part in a discussion with youth, community organizers and public officials about divesting the City of Boston from fossil fuels, as well as other concerns around climate change and environmental justice.  Note that this panel is estimated to be about 3 hours long, with opening remarks and questions for panelists from 4:15 - 5, questions for youth from 5 - 5:45, and public testimony between 5:45 and 7.  Many of us will be moving to the Mayor's event (see below) around 6:15.  

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Divining for the Environment: An Ifá Response to the Environmental Crisis
WHEN  Mon., Nov. 17, 2014, 4:15 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Common Room, CSWR, 42 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture
SPONSOR Center for the Study of World Religions
CONTACT Lexi Gewertz, 617.495.4476
DETAILS  This event is part of the Junior Fellowship series "Religion and Nature," and features speakers Harvard PhD candidate Oludamini Ogunnaike and Harvard PhD candidate and licensed babalawo Ayodeji Ogunnaike.
The environmental crisis presents a particularly difficult challenge for Africa and Africans: although largely not of our making, it threatens us and our homelands with the clear and imminent dangers of coastal flooding and desertification. In response to these high stakes, this paper employs the Yoruba tradition of Ifa divination to explore how indigenous African religious thought can guide African scholars and leaders in understanding the root causes and addressing the consequences of the current environmental crisis. We take four different narratives from Ifá, as well as the hermeneutics of the Ifá divination system, as models for understanding and addressing different facets of the environmental crisis. Our analysis of these myths suggests several important ways in which both Africans and non-Africans can and must understand and interact with the environment, challenging many Western paradigms, which, we argue, are largely responsible for creating the current crisis with which we must now contend.

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Planets and Life Series: Welcome to the Anthropocene, Climate Change and Hurricanes
Monday, November 17
4:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building 2-105, 182 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Kerry Emanuel (MIT)

Planets and Life: Human and Planetary Perspectives
Weekly lecture and discussion series exploring the co-evolution of the earth's natural systems and life

Web site: http://eapsweb.mit.edu/events/2014/planets-life
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS) Lectures
For more information, contact:  Vlada Stamenkovic
rinsan@mit.edu

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Social Entrepreneurs and the Role of Foundations
Monday, November 17
5:30 PM to 7:00 PM (EST)
MIT, Building E51-149, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/social-entrepreneurs-and-the-role-of-foundations-registration-13861888281

This lecture will focus on social enterprises in Africa and Asia and the role foundations, such as DOEN, play in their development. Based on the stories of entrepreneurs, the lecture will provide insight into the major constraints, challenges and opportunities entrepreneurs face.
As a promoter of people and organisations that take the lead in the field of sustainable, cultural and social innovation, DOEN believes in a green, socially-inclusive and creative society. DOEN supports these innovators and brings them into contact with each other
Annually, DOEN supports more than 200 initiatives by means of subsidies, participations, loans and guarantees. These initiatives are characterised by their enterprising approach: people, organisations and enterprises that dare to take risks, that are creative and innovatory and thus effectively contribute to a better and cleaner world.
DOEN supports initiatives in the field of Culture and Cohesion and Green and Inclusive Economy.
Presented by: Nina Tellegen, CEO, DOEN Foundation

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Conflict, Convivencia, and the Life of Buildings
Monday, November 17
6:00p–7:30p
MIT, Building 3-133, 33 Massachusetts Ave (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: Michele Lamprakos, School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, University of Maryland-College Park

Web site: http://web.mit.edu/akpia/www/lecturescurrent.htm
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture
For more information, contact:  Jose Luis Arguello
253-1400
akpiarch@mit.edu

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Meet and mingle with Christopher Ahlberg, world leading Swedish information entrepreneur 
Monday, November 17
6.00pm - 8.00pm
SACC NE HQ, 560 Harrison Avenue, #404 Boston
Complimentary refreshments and appetizers will be served at SACC NE HQ
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/meet-christopher-ahlberg-in-sacc-ne-speaker-series-tickets-14069338771

Dr. Christopher Ahlberg is the CEO of Recorded Future, Inc. and Chairman of Hult International Business School. Before founding Recorded Future, Christopher was the president of the Spotfire division at TIBCO, which he founded in 1996 and in 2007 sold to TIBCO (Nasdaq: TIBX). Spotfire was founded based on his ground-breaking research on information visualization.
With a doctorate from Chalmers University of Technology, Christopher's vision and entrepreneurship has earned him the recognition as one of the worlds top 100 young innovators by MIT Technology Review.

After 8PM the party continues at Gas Light for those who wish!

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MIT Water Innovation Prize - Idea Pitch & Dinner
Monday, November 17
6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
MIT, Media Lab 6th Floor, Silverman Skyline Room, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

At the event, you'll have an opportunity to pitch your water-related idea/research/project, find team members, and learn about the exciting water innovation happening at MIT and the surrounding area.

For more information, contact:  Liz Voeller
wipteam@mit.edu

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Mayor Walsh's Civic Academy 
Monday, November 17
6:30-8 PM
NE Aquarium, 1 Aquarium Wharf, Boston

This is the second session of Mayor Walsh's Civic Academy Program. This event will focus on the City's environment and energy department, specifically the work in creating the Climate Action Plan for Boston.

For questions and comments about the Civic Academy Program, please contact the Mayor's Office of Neighborhood Services at 617-635-3485

Draft of the 2014 Climate Action Plan at http://greenovateboston.org//news/mayor-walsh-releases-draft-climate-action-plan-for-public-comment/

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EARTH A New Wild Screening
Monday, November 17
7:00 PM to 9:00 PM (EST)
WGBH, 1 Guest Street, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/earth-a-new-wild-screening-tickets-13553806801

Be among the first to see clips from PBS's five-part series EARTH A New Wild, premiering in February. Join Leading conservation scientist and host Dr. M. Sanjayan as we take a deeper look at the extraordinary way humans are intimately connected to wild animals and wild places of this planet.
The screening will be followed by a small dessert reception and studio tours.

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Tuesday, November 18
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U.S. Middle East Policy & Media Coverage
Tuesday, November 18
12 p.m.
Harvard, Taubman 275, 5 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Jeffrey Goldberg, National Correspondent, The Atlantic.

More information at http://shorensteincenter.org/jeffrey-goldberg/

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FAA Deputy Administrator to Speak about NextGen's Impact on Transportation and the Economy
Tuesday, November 18
12:00pm
Volpe, The National Transportation Systems Center, 55 Broadway, Cambridge
RSVP to Ellen Bell, director of Strategic Initiatives for Research and Innovation, at ellen.bell@dot.gov
Webinar https://volpe-events.webex.com/mw0401l/mywebex/default.do?siteurl=volpe-events

Michael G. Whitaker, Deputy Administrator, Federal Aviation Administration
Michael G. Whitaker, deputy administrator for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), will discuss how the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) is crucial to enable growth and change in aviation. He will also examine how NextGen will make the U.S. more competitive in the global economy and the impact of aviation on U.S. regional economies.

Michael G. Whitaker is the Deputy Administrator for FAA. Whitaker is responsible for helping to ensure the safe and efficient operations of the largest aerospace system in the world. This includes more than 50,000 daily operations as well as enforcing safety standards for all equipment and aerospace professionals within the aviation industry.

Whitaker also serves as the Chief NextGen Officer and is responsible for the development and implementation of FAA's NextGen. NextGen is an air traffic control modernization program that is shifting from ground-based radar to state-of-the-art satellite technology.

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Urban Agriculture in Boston
Tuesday, November 18
12–1 pm
Harvard Law School, Hauser 102, Cambridge

Boston is a leader in the urban agriculture movement. Come hear from four panelists that have been very involved in the process of bringing urban agriculture to Boston and helping to reduce the barriers urban farmers face. The panelists are Edith Murnane, from the City of Boston’s Office of Food Initiatives, which has helped lead Boston’s urban agriculture initiative; Alli Condra, from the Harvard Food Law and Policy Clinic, which helped create a document guiding farmers through city and state approval and permitting processes; Chris LaPointe, from the Trust for Public Land, which received permit approval to create the first urban farm in Boston under the new zoning code; and Alex Gellar, from Fathom, which created an app that helps urban farmers find land within Boston.

More at: http://green.harvard.edu/events/urban-agriculture-boston#sthash.UTPw7E9b.dpuf

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Bundle Up! game and relationship of architecture to ecology
Tuesday, November 18
12:00 PM
BSA Space, 290 Congress Street, Boston
RSVP at https://online.architects.org/bsassa/censsareqauth?p_url=evtssarsvp.display_page%3Fp_cust_id%3D__CUSTID__%26p_event_id%3D1449%26p_item_id%3DCTE_RSVP
Meetings are free and open to all, but rsvp's are required

Bundle Up! is a fun way to learn how to develop optimal strategies for Net Zero Designs. Based on an understanding of the relationship of architecture to ecology, the session will explore Systems Thinking and the Integrated Design Process. A short video of the Bundle Up! game in practice will illustrate the connection between climate and use to MPE systems and the design process.

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Career Insights on FEMA, HUD, and the PMF Process
Tuesday, November 18
1:00 – 2:30 PM
Harvard Kennedy School, Taubman 275, 5 Eliot Street, Cambridge

Our guest, Katherine Buckingham will share thoughts and answer student questions on working with FEMA and on her experience as a Presidential Management Fellow.

Katherine Buckingham is a Presidential Management Fellow based in FEMA’s Recovery Directorate. She has completed rotations at HUD’s Office of Economic Resilience and FEMA’s Region 1 Field Office focusing on disaster recovery and resilience and climate change adaptation. She received her Master's degree in City Planning from MIT with a focus in environmental policy and planning. Prior to that, she worked on land use and economic development state policy research and advocacy in Ohio.

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Business Consulting for Survival Entrepreneurs in Slums and Townships
Tuesday, November 18
1:30 PM to 3:00 PM (PST)
Northeastern University, Curry Student Center #333, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/business-consulting-for-survival-entrepreneurs-in-slums-and-townships-tickets-13754721743

Presented by the Social Enterprise Institute, this event will showcase student work accomplished in South Africa and the Dominican Republic this summer. Students will present and discuss what they did to help South African and Dominican entrepreneurs build their businesses.

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Mountebanks, Con-Men, and Heretics: An Epistemology of Scientific Crackpottery
WHEN  Tue., Nov. 18, 2014, 3:15 – 4:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Institute for Learning in Retirement, 34 Concord Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Health Sciences, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Harvard Institute for Learning in Retirement
SPEAKER(S)  Chris Miller, Professor of Biochemistry, Brandeis University.
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS  Chris Miller, fresh back from a year at Oxford University studying ion channels—the protons that make electricity in all types of cells—is fascinated by scientists who claim to have made significant discoveries and who, thanks to personality, timing, and often good luck, have managed to convince many people of the rightness of their fabrications and delusions. No fraud he, but a member of the National Academy of Sciences and recipient of numerous awards and honors.
LINK http://hilr.dce.harvard.edu/news-and-events/mountebanks-con-men-and-heretics-epistemology-scientific-crackpottery

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"The Roots of Technological Controvery: Genetically Modified Crops in Africa.”
Tuesday, November 18
4:30pm
MIT, Building E19-623, 400 Main Street, Cambridge  

Calestous Juma, Harvard

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Kremlin propaganda: can Putin control it?
Tuesday, November 18
4:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Anna Arutunyan, independent Russian journalist
Anna Arutunyan is an independent Russian journalist and author of The Putin Mystique (2014).
The propaganda campaign unleashed by the Kremlin during the Ukraine crisis has been unprecedented in post-Soviet history. Yet it is also something one Kremlin insider has described as a megaphone directed at Putin himself. Has Putin created a monster he can no longer control? Given the Kremlin's information campaign portraying Russian fighters battling fascism, will he and his advisors be able to find an exit strategy from Ukraine?

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): MISTI MIT-Russia Program, Center for International Studies, Security Studies Program
For more information, contact:  Emma Kaminskaya
617-324-2793
ekaminsk@mit.edu

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"Anthropology in Warzones"
Tuesday, November 18
4:30 to 6:00pm
Northeastern University, 310 Renaissance Park, 1135 Tremont Street, Boston

Montgomery McFate of the U.S. Naval War College
The series consists of two talks presenting contrasting viewpoints on the relationship between anthropological/social science research and war, particularly regarding the issue of research ethics. It would be great to have lots of peace activists to ask critical questions and give your point of view!

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Modern War Gardens: Paradise Lost
Tuesday, November 18
5:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building 2-105, 182 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Lalage Snow, photojournalist, filmmaker and writer based in London
Photographer Lalage Snow speaks about her project, Modern War Gardens: Paradise Lost. She draws on the cultural significance of gardens to understand what life is really like for those living in the shadows of war in the Middle East.

Gardens symbolize permanence, longevity, triumph in adversity, hope, growth and Paradise. They also provide food, shade, peace, fuel, protection, privacy and escape. Nurturing them is an integral part of defiance, resistance and therapy in a time of war.

For more information on Lalage Snow: http://www.lalagesnow.co.uk/

Sponsored by the MIT Global France Seminar

Web site: https://mitgsl.mit.edu/news-events/modern-war-gardens-paradise-lost
Open to: the general public
Cost: 0
Sponsor(s): Women's and Gender Studies, MIT Global Studies and Languages
For more information, contact:  Lisa Hickler
617-452-2676
lhickler@mit.edu

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e4Dev Speaker Series: Revolution of the kitchen--social processes of adoption of improved and removal of traditional cookstoves
Tuesday, November 18, 2014
5:30p–6:30p
MIT, Building E19-319, 400 Main Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1Rq4_1Vi06YIVG14KAnqSY-1TzRCveZoDBbtnMTRyIo0/viewform

Speaker: Yiting Wang-Researcher, Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies
Yiting Wang recently finished her Master of Environmental Science at the Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies (Yale F&ES). She is currently a researcher with the Green Markets Lab at Yale F&ES. Her research focuses on the intersection of climate, energy and development. She traces how these issues have been increasingly approached through market-based mechanisms such as carbon finance and how actors access the market and the wealth it generates based on her fieldwork in Kenya and Uganda. From her research in the Indian Himalaya, she also examines household energy transition from a gender lens and reveals how social processes are driving technological change.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): MIT Energy Initiative, e4Dev
For more information, contact:  Lily Mwalenga
e4dev-request@mit.edu

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Protecting the Ash Tree: Wabanaki Diplomacy and Sustainability Science in Maine
Tuesday, November 18
6:00PM
Harvard, Geological Lecture Hall, 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Darren Ranco, Associate Professor of Anthropology and Coordinator of Native American Research, University of Maine
Brown ash trees sustain the ancestral basket-making traditions of the Wabanaki people of Maine and play a key role in their creation myths. These trees are now threatened by the emerald ash borer, a beetle that has already killed millions of ash trees in the eastern United States. Wabanaki tribes and basket makers have joined forces with foresters, university researchers, and landowners to develop and deploy actions aimed at preventing an invasion by this insect. Anthropologist Darren Ranco discusses how the stakeholders in this interdisciplinary effort are using sustainability science and drawing from Wabanaki forms of diplomacy to influence state and federal responses to the emerald ash borer and prevent the demise of the ash trees central to Wabanaki culture.

Lecture. Free and open to the public.
Presented jointly with the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology
The Legacy of Penobscot Canoes: A View from the River, an exhibition in the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, will remain open until 9:00 pm following the lecture.

http://www.hmnh.harvard.edu/lectures_and_special_events/index.php
More at: http://environment.harvard.edu/events/2014-11-18-230000/protecting-ash-tree-wabanaki-diplomacy-and-sustainability-science-maine#sthash.dsXFG7f8.dpuf

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Food of the Future, Future of Food
Tuesday, November 18
6:00 PM to 8:30 PM
American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 136 Irving Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/food-of-the-future-future-of-food-tickets-14071695821

Italy will host the 2015 World Exposition in Milan under the main theme “Feeding the planet.  Energy for life.”  The event represents an opportunity to share strategies and problem solving styles with regards to food security and sustainable access to nutrition as well as to showcase industrial innovation in this field.  The Greater Boston Area, with its prestigious universities and state-of-the-art research centers, is a favorite place for reviewing the most recent applications that could be employed in the agro-food sector, always taking into consideration a sustainable context.  The aim of this symposium is to connect cutting age technologies developed within many different disciplines with food and nutrition perspectives.

Challenges and Perspective for an Inclusive and Sustainable Access to Food
Fabio Marazzi
If nine hundred million people suffer from malnutrition while an equal number suffer the effects of overeating and a poorly-disciplined diet, it is clear that the theme of safe, healthy eating is a truly global issue that directly or indirectly involves most of the earth’s population.  To provide responses to t these increasingly pressing themes, EXPO 2015 wants to be the occasion to represent excellence in the methods, techniques and rules of food production, in strategies for achieving energy savings in food production and int he rational use of renewable energy resources and the conservation of natural resources.

Living Materials for Food Safety
Fiorenzo Omenetto
The use of biomaterials for technological applications has been introduced over the past few years.  Among these, silk is finding new applications as a useful biocompatible, edible material platform with utility in high technology applications.  WE will overview ho purified silkworm silk can be reassembled, among other things, in a multitude of high quality, micro- and nanostructure optical and illustrate the implication of a new class of “living materials” that can affect our daily lives, from the way we administer drugs, to the way we consume food.

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Cryptocurrencies: The Challenges and Opportunities Ahead
Tuesday, November 18
6:00 PM to 8:30 PM
swissnex Boston, Consulate of Switzerland, 420 Broadway, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/cryptocurrencies-the-challenges-and-opportunities-ahead-tickets-13885518961

Everyday a new article arises on the subject of cryptocurrencies  - be it on Bitcoins, or on any of the other digital currencies currently being traded globally. But, what exactly is a cryptocurrency - a currency, a commodity, or another asset class? And, what does one stand to gain from this new system? Is the cryptocurrency trend a boom about to go bust, or is it technology that offers more? How can this system become mainstream? What legal framework and regulations will be necessary to facilitate the use of cryptocurrencies?  These and many other questions will be the focus of the second event of our Future of Money series.

A panel of both Swiss and American industry experts will discuss the underpinnings of cryptocurrencies and examine key questions about the future of this innovation. This event will be a unique opportunity to understand the workings of Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies. The panel discussion will be followed by a Q&A and networking reception.

Program
6 PM: Doors Open
6:30 PM: Welcome Address by Dr. Felix Moesner, CEO/Consul swissnex Boston
6:40 PM: Panel Discussion with Q&A
8:00 PM: Reception
8:30 PM: Doors Close

Panelists
Moderator
Euny Hong, Author, Birth of Korean Cool
Panelists
Christian Decker, Distributed Computing Group, ETH Zürich
Gil Luria, Managing Director and Equity Research at Wedbush Securities
Chrisopher Odom, CTO and Co-founder at Monetas
Kyle Powers, Co-founder of Liberty Teller

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Boston New Technology November 2014 Product Showcase #BNT47
Tuesday, November 18
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Akamai Technologies, 8 Cambridge Center, Cambridge

Check in at the registration table in the lobby with your BNT registration.
Free event! Come learn about 6 Cambridge startup community! Each presenter gets 5 minutes for product demonstration and 5 minutes for Questions & Answers.

Products / Presenters:
1.  Connections / @cn_app - Craft Reliable Relationships (Sergey Kudryavtsev / @SDigitao) Tech: iOS, Android. ConnectionsApp.us
2.  Core and Antelope - A Read-Time Document Summarization Service (Jones Yu) Tech: Python, JavaScript. www.prentice-lab.com
3.  Composable Analytics - Web-based environment allowing users to explore, create, and collaborate on analytical methods and reporting applications using a dataflow-based methodology. (Lars Fiedler) Tech: HTML5, .NET, jQuery, Hadoop, SQL Server. composableanalytics.com
4. Whovoo / @whovoo - When you want to be absolutely, positively private and secret. (Jim Acquaviva / @acquaman55) Tech: GUI: Native iPhone app for v1.0. Server: Node.js, MongoDB for web service, JSON-RPC for communication, TLS/SSL encryption required, Hosted at AWS. Whovoo.com
5. Shareity app / @Shareityapp - Viral-micro-social donating platform for causes. Our lean charity model is dedicated to getting 100% to the cause. (Benjamin Hill) Tech: iOS. Shareity.me
6.  DealData.net - Private Company/Fund Market Intelligence (Lenny Grover / @lennygrover) Tech: Java PHP MySQL. DealData.net

Agenda:
6:00 to 7:00 - Networking with dinner and beverages
7:00 to 7:10 - Announcements
7:10 to 8:20 - Presentations, Questions & Answers
8:20 to 9:00 - Networking

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Creating Public Doubt about Scientific Facts
Tuesday, November 18
6:30 PM
Belmont Media Center, 9 Lexington Street, Belmont MA

Naomi Oreskes, PhD, Professor of the History of Science, Harvard University
Author of Merchants of Doubt (with Erik M. Conway) and The Collapse of Western Civilization (w/Erik M. Conway). Over decades, a few well-known scientists have represented various corporate interests in campaigns to mislead the public about threats to health and environment. Dr. Oreskes discusses the disinformation campaigns about tobacco and cancer, CFCs and the ozone hole, coal and acid rain, and now climate change. She describes the structure of those disinformation efforts and how the public can combat the "manufacture of doubt," which is the subject of her best-selling book (with Erik Conway).

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Josef Albers: Minimal Means, Maximum Effect
WHEN  Tue., Nov. 18, 2014, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Piper Auditorium, Gund Hall, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Art/Design, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Harvard Graduate School of Design
SPEAKER(S)  Nicholas Fox Weber and Toshiko Mori
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS  Nicholas Fox Weber, director of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, will evoke the personality and sensibilities of Josef Albers, the Bauhaus faculty member, through reflections on his experience as Albers’s student at Yale as well as descriptions of recent projects by the Albers Foundation that affirm the Bauhaus spirit of design and continue its commitment to improving human life generally. Toshiko Mori, Robert P. Hubbard Professor in the Practice of Architecture, will share her recent projects for a health care facility, a cultural center in Senegal, and student projects from recent GSD studios in collaboration with the Albers Foundation.
Part of the series “Then and Now: Walter Gropius and the Lineage of the Bauhaus,” sponsored by the Breger Fund in Honor of Walter Gropius.
LINK www.gsd.harvard.edu/#/events/nicholas-fox-weber-and-toshiko-mori-josef-albers-minimal-means.html

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What will the Power Grid Look Like 50 Years From Now?
Tuesday, November 18
6:30 - 8:30 PM
Constant Contact, 3rd Floor, The Great Room, 1601 Trapelo Road, Waltham
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/what-will-the-power-grid-look-like-50-years-from-now-tickets-13927410259
Cost:  $25 general public, $10 students

The power grid of the fossil era was functional. It did its job very well over many decades, and did such that we nearly could forget about the power system being there. A few national power providers and even fewer grid operators managed it and electricity came from our home and business electrical sockets.

Renewables led into a new era, which brought power closer to the people. Energy became more democratic. Many more individuals, companies, municipalities, cities and such produce, consume, store, trade, and manage energy now, much like users generate content on the internet we see distributed user generated energy.

With this shift in energy generation and storage the roles and activities of individuals and existing providers is changing. Is the existing grid infrastructure representative of the new era of a smart and renewable power systems? Can the infrastructure of past industrial times with all its connotations of yesterday, poor working conditions, magnetic fields, danger, top-down, dirty energy etc. become sexy, exciting, desirable messengers of a better renewable future?

How are we moving forward thinking about the security of our grid? Are SCADA systems protected both from hackers and electromagnetic attack? Are we still vulnerable to EMP attack? Will solar flares be of concern to the existing or new grid? What ever happened to Tesla's wireless energy transmission? Is that concept being looked into for the future since we have had the advent of many wireless communications, why not transmit the energy and do away with the grid?

What are the key problems for the grid as it stands to move forward? Regulation/de-regulation - is it a policy thing? Is distributed generation hacking away at the large scale centralized energy generation of old? Join in the discussion of where the grid is and is going and learn what opportunity exists in the market to move our power grid forward in the next 50 years!

Some resources to review for this session:

The Future Electric Grid (PDF, 4MB)
Critical National Infrastructures Report (PDF, 7MB)
Solar Storm Risk to the North American Electric Grid (PDF, 0.8MB)
Tesla and Wireless Energy - The power that could have been (HTML)

Panel:
Matt DaPrato, Senior Research Analyst, IHS Emerging Energy Research and IHS CERA
Matthew DaPrato advises clients, including governments, financial institutions, utilities, wind developers, turbine manufacturers and component suppliers, through research advisory services, consulting projects, and in-person presentations. He is Senior Research Analyst on the Americas Wind team covering North and South American Wind Energy Markets and working as part of the IHS CERA North America Power team covering transmission.

He co-authored “US Wind O&M Strategies: 2012-2025” analyzing the competitive landscape, projected costs, and market size and opportunity for established and new entrants throughout wind value chain. He has also co-authored a first-of-its-kind transmission market study, “US High Voltage Markets and Strategies: 2010-2020” that analyzed state, regional, and federal legislative and regulatory policy as well as the competitive market positioning of transmission developing utilities, IPPs, and developers. Matthew graduated with a B.S. from Boston College and a M.S. in Economic Development from Northeastern University.

Roger Faulkner, VP R&D at Alevo, Inc.
It seems obvious to me that powering our economy with non-dispatchable renewable energy requires robust continental scale transmission capacity (a supergrid), and that we will never be politically able to build that capacity unless it is put underground. Some form of electricity pipeline that can carry > 10 GW per line is absolutely required if we are to have a renewable energy future. My particular design to answer this need is the elpipe, which is a mashup of a pipeline, a powerline, and a train. The train-like features of an elpipe allow all splices to made in a cleanroom environment at one end of the line, with advanced automated inspection tools applied to every splice; this is a great advance over fabrication methods requiring field fabrication of splices. Elpipes can also be repaired rapidly, as is essential for such an important infrastructure. The transmission we are building today is short-sighted in that it will not fit into a future supergrid and will become stranded investments due to incompatible voltage and also somewhat due to inflexible AC/DC converter designs. I have no doubt that elpipes or something functionally equivalent to elpipes will dominate power transmission in 50 years, enabling many different innovations with remote generation and energy storage schemes; either that, or we must have a breakthrough in cheap, acceptable nuclear fusion energy.

Tom Ollila, Demand Management Programs, Reading Municipal Light Department and North Shore InnoVentures Cleantech Business Development Director

Michael Ahern, Director of Power Systems Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
Michael "Mike" Ahern is the Director of Power Systems at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI). He is responsible for growing and developing energy related programs delivered through WPI’s Corporate and Professional Education Division. Mike helps WPI support the educational needs of both corporate partners and individual students. Further, Mike improves the quality of the student experience by working with faculty to update the curriculum and share best practices in course delivery, both online and classroom.

Mike has expertise in energy efficiency and renewable power. He has conducted IEEE Power and Energy Society Webinars on Green Energy and co-presented “A Systems View of Renewable Power” at the IEEE Energy Tech 2013 conference. He has also given several guest lectures on energy topics at Yale University and to the alumni of both MIT and RPI.

Mike brings over 35 years of professional experience in electric utility operations.  At Northeast Utilities, he rose through increasing responsible positions in: Generation Engineering; Asset Management; Distribution Engineering; and Transmission Operations to become Vice President of Services from 2005 to 2012. He served on NU’s Executive Committees on: Corporate Ethics and Controls; Safety and Health; and Cybersecurity. Following his retirement from NU in 2012, he joined WPI in his current capacity.

Mike earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Worcester Polytechnic Institute where he was selected as a member of Tau Beta Pi (the National Engineering Honor Society). He later earned both Master of Science and Master of Business Administration degrees from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He is a registered professional engineer in Connecticut and held a Transmission System Operator certification from the North American Electric Reliability Council.

Moderator:
Brian Hult, Associate Scientist, Cabot Corporation

While at studying in Graduate School at Northeastern U., Brian pursued research in nanomaterials for PEM fuel cells and Li-ion batteries and graduated with a MS in Chemistry and MS in Technology Entrepreneurship. Brian has worked as a lab director at an environmental analytical firm, spearheaded bioanalytical research at a pharma CRO, and now is Associate Scientist at Cabot Corporation in Billerica, MA, where he has developed inkjet dispersions and novel reinforcing particles for rubber used in the tire industry. Brian's 16 year career in chemistry has led him to his current niche in new product R&D and innovation. Brian interests include the high-performance automotive, energy, and all things nano.

Agenda:
6:30-7:00pm Check-in, Light Refreshments & Networking
7:00-7:45pm Q&A Session with Moderator
7:45-8:30pm Open Audience Q&A Session
8:30pm Wrap-up & Networking

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Innovations in Wind Energy Lecture Series: Cape Wind
Tuesday, November 18
7:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building 3-333, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: Mark Rodgers
Cape Wind Communications Director Mark Rodgers will provide an overview of the Cape Wind project, slated to be America's first offshore wind farm 6 miles offshore from Cape Cod on Horseshoe Shoal in Nantucket Sound. Cape Wind's 130 offshore wind turbines will power 200,000 homes in average winds and up to 500,000 homes in strong winds. Mr. Rodgers will discuss the various issues Cape Wind has faced in its effort to become the US's first offshore wind farm. Hosted by the MIT Energy Club: Wind Community. Pizza will be served. RSVP: http://goo.gl/forms/olAVJQhzaG

Web site: http://goo.gl/forms/olAVJQhzaG
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): MIT Energy Club: Wind Community
For more information, contact:  James Slonaker
wind@mit.edu 

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Codebreaker: A Special Screening and Q&A
WHEN  Tue., Nov. 18, 2014, 7 p.m.
WHERE Harvard, Northwest B103, 52 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Film, Lecture, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
SPEAKER(S)  Patrick Sammon, executive producer
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS  CODEBREAKER tells the remarkable and tragic story of one of the 20th century's most important people. Alan Turing set in motion the computer age and his World War II codebreaking helped turn the tide of war. This maverick British genius is one of the most important scientists ever, yet few people have heard his name, know his story, or understand his legacy.
Historians say by breaking the German Naval Enigma code, Turing helped shorten the Second World War by two years, saving millions of lives. As the founding father of computer science and artificial intelligence, Alan Turing envisioned our digital world long before anyone else.
Instead of receiving accolades, Turing faced terrible persecution. In 1952, the British Government forced him to undergo chemical castration as punishment for his homosexuality. In despair, Turing committed suicide on June 7, 1954. He was only 41 years old.
CODEBREAKER is a drama-documentary that uses emotional and engaging reconstructions to bring Turing to life in intricate detail and high color. The drama scenes center on the therapy sessions Turing participated in during the last 18 months of his life. Turing undertook voluntary psychotherapy with a German Jewish analyst. Dr. Franz Greenbaum had fled Berlin with his young family in 1939, barely escaping the Nazis. Unlike most psychiatrists and psychoanalysts of the day, Greenbaum had enlightened views about homosexuality. Greenbaum also took an interest in Turing’s mathematical insights with the patient/therapist relationship eventually becoming a friendship, as Turing made social visits to the Greenbaum home.
Built on a solid historical foundation of true events, Turing is our storyteller as he defiantly searches for answers. Documentary elements seamlessly interconnect with drama scenes to offer a three dimensional picture of Turing, his accomplishments, his tragic end, and his lasting legacy.
LINK http://www.seas.harvard.edu/calendar/event/80321

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Human Space Travel: Where Have We Been? Where are We Going?
Tuesday, November 18
8:00pm
Tufts, The Coolidge Room, Ballou Hall, 1 The Green, Medford

Captain Rick Hauck

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Wednesday, November 19
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November Boston Sustainability Breakfast
Wednesday, November 19
7:30 AM to 8:30 AM (EST)
Pret A Manger, 185 Franklin Street, Post Office Square, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/november-boston-sustainability-breakfast-tickets-13973271431

Join us for the November installment of our Boston Sustainability Breakfast, an informal breakfast meetup of sustainability professionals together for networking, discussion and moral support.  It’s important to remind ourselves that we are not the only ones out there in the business world trying to do good!
So come, get a cup of coffee or a bagel, support a sustainable business and get fired up before work so we can continue trying to change the world.

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Are Failing Bees Our Warning Sign? An HLS Green Team Talk with Dr. Alex Lu
Wednesday, November 19
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM (EST)
Harvard Law School, 1575 Massachusetts Avenue, Hauser Hall, Room 102, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/are-failing-bees-our-warning-sign-an-hls-green-team-talk-with-dr-alex-lu-tickets-14204593321

A Talk by Chensheng (Alex) Lu, PhD, Associate Professor of Environmental Exposure Biology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
The Harvard Law School Green Team is pleased to present this lecture by Prof. Alex Lu on the roots of the honeybee colony collapse, a phenomenon with far reaching implications for sustainability's 'triple bottom line' of people, profit and the planet.
Prof. Lu's presentation will highlight the emergence of the honeybee colony collapse disorder (CCD) in 2005-06, its link to the introduction of systemic insecticides and neonicotinoids and to the genetically engineered seed industry, and how the Harvard CCD study has impacted public policy on saving honeybees and other pollinators.
A light lunch will be served.

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Building Food System 6.0 with Paul Matteucci
Wednesday, November 19
12-1pm
MIT, Building E62-276, 100 Main St. Cambridge
RSVP at http://goo.gl/C5Niqz

Paul Matteucci is a venture capitalist, entrepreneur, corporate executive, fly fisherman and home cook. He is passionate about building companies, creating jobs with opportunity, recreating the global food system, building the world’s first privately-funded national park, cooking, baseball, mystery novels and his family.
 
“The great thing about being an entrepreneur or a venture capitalist is that one gets to view many of the biggest problems the world is facing as opportunities for creativity and innovation.”

Paul is an Operating Partner at U.S. Venture Partners, one of the true pioneers of venture capital, which have helped make Silicon Valley a leader in IT technology and health care innovation. He is also the Founder of Feeding 10 Billion, a non-profit initiative focused on building a robust eco-system of information and people to help entrepreneurs start and grow their food-system businesses.

F10B [Feeding 10 Billion] is a “for-purpose” enterprise that addresses the growing interest in AgTech and NewFood among creative entrepreneurs. F10B helps build the same type of robust ecosystem of information resources and experienced help for Food System Entrepreneurs as has benefited entrepreneurs in information technology and health care for more than thirty years.

Matteucci brings to this lecture years of business experience. Prior to USVP, Paul was CEO of HearMe, as well as Vice President and General Manager of the SCSI host adapter division for Adaptec. He has served as a Resident Entrepreneur for Institutional Venture Partners and as an advisor to Accel Partners, Redpoint Ventures and Sutter Hill Ventures.

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Frederick W. Mayer: Narrative Politics - The Medium is the Story
WHEN  Wed., Nov. 19, 2014, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Kennedy School, Taubman 275, 5 Eliot Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Frederick "Fritz" Mayer, Duke University
CONTACT INFO tim_bailey@hks.harvard.edu, 617.495.8209
LINK http://shorensteincenter.org/frederick-mayer/

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National Security and Double Government with Professors Michael Glennon and Stephen Walt
WHEN  Wed., Nov. 19, 2014, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Wasserstein Hall, Room 1010, 1585 Mass Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Harvard National Security Journal, Harvard National Security and Law Association, American Constitution Society at HLS, Federalist Society at HLS
SPEAKER(S)  Professors Michael Glennon and Stephen Walt

Editorial Comment:  This is an important discussion about the government behind the government, why the National Security State continues no matter who the people vote for.  Not conspiracy theory but the facts of the bureaucratic life of the military industrial complex.  See Boston Globe article “Vote All You Want.  The Secret Government Won’t Change”:
http://www.bostonglobe.com/ideas/2014/10/18/vote-all-you-want-the-secret-government-won-change/jVSkXrENQlu8vNcBfMn9sL/story.html

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The Nuclear Deadline:  The Iranian Negotiations: Possible Outcomes and Implications
Wednesday, November 19
12:00p–1:30p
MIT, Building 24-213, Access Via 60 Vassar Street, Cambridge
RSVP to weinmann@mit.edu

Speaker: R.Scott Kemp
You are invited to a round-table discussion led by Professor R. Scott Kemp of the MIT Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering. Under the shadow of the November 24th deadline, Professor Kemp will lead the discussion on current nuclear negotiations with Iran, and their possible outcomes and implications for international nonproliferation efforts, disarmament and nuclear security.

Kemp's research combines physics, engineering and the history of science to draw more clearly the limits and policy options for achieving international security under technical constraints. He is an expert on enrichment technology and has previous experience as the State Department's science advisor in the Office of the Special Advisor for Nonproliferation and Arms Control.

Lunch will be provided. Please email to reserve a spot.

Web site: radius.mit.edu
Open to: the general public
Tickets: RSVP: weinmann@mit.edu
Sponsor(s): The Technology and Culture Forum at MIT, MIT Global Zero
For more information, contact:  Patricia-Maria Weinmann
617-253-0108
weinmann@mit.edu

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The Organization of Violence and Rebel Behavior
Wednesday, November 19, 2014
12:00p–2:00p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: BARBARA F. WALTER, UC San Diego
SSP Wednesday Seminar Series

Web site: http://web.mit.edu/ssp/seminars/index.html
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Security Studies Program
For more information, contact:  Elina Hamilton
253-7529

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The Changing Mindset of Arab Youth from the Prism of Opinion Surveys
WHEN  Wed., Nov. 19, 2014, 1 – 2:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Nye Conference Room A, Taubman Building, 5th Floor, 5 Eliot Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR The Middle East Initiative
SPEAKER(S)  Ishac Diwan
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS  A seminar with Ishac Diwan, distinguished chair of Arab world studies at Paris Sciences et Lettres, visiting researcher at Université Paris-Dauphine and Paris School of Economics, and research affiliate at the Middle East Initiative
LINK http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/events/6481/the_changing_mindset_of_arab_youth_from_the_prism_of_opinion_surveys_with_ishac_diwan.html

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Monetization of Eastern Mediterranean Energy Assets
WHEN  Wed., Nov. 19, 2014, 2:15 – 4:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Kennedy School of Government, Malkin Penthouse, Littauer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Eastern Mediterranean and Europe, CES
SPEAKER(S)  Charles Ellinas, CEO, e-Cyprus National Hydrocarbons; Bruce Everett, The Fletcher School of Law & Diplomacy, Tufts University; Francis O'Sullivan, director of research and analysis, MIT Energy Initiative; Leslie Palti-Guzman, senior analyst, Eurasia Group
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO Constantinos_Papaloucas@hks15.harvard.edu
DETAILS  The discovery of sizable natural gas fields off the coast of Cyprus and Israel, as well as an exploration push for additional hydrocarbon resources in the territorial waters of other countries in the Levant Basin, is changing the energy matrix regarding regional self-sufficiency and export markets. However, the monetization of hydrocarbon resources in the Eastern Mediterranean is a complex process involving technological, political, economic, and geostrategic factors. This panel of experts will explore the opportunities and constraints involved in the monetization of Eastern Mediterranean energy assets.
LINK ces.fas.harvard.edu/#/events/2933

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Collective Decisions by Preference aggregation: Between Artificial Intelligence and Social Choice
WHEN  Wed., Nov. 19, 2014, 4 p.m.
WHERE  Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Sheerr Room, Fay House, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
SPEAKER(S)  Francesca Rossi, Radcliffe Institute fellow and University of Padova
COST  Free and open to the public
LINK http://www.radcliffe.harvard.edu/event/2014-francesca-rossi-fellow-presentation

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Exploring Global Prosperity: Legatum Prosperity Index
Wednesday, November 19
5:30 PM to 7:30 PM
MIT, Building E51-395, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/exploring-global-prosperity-legatum-prosperity-index-registration-13859348685

What does it mean for a nation to be prosperous? Is it all about GDP? If national success is about more than just wealth, how can you accurately measure it over time? This event will explore the data and findings from the new 2014 Global Prosperity Index, the definitive measure of global progress.

Presented by: Nathan Gamester, Programme Director, Prosperity Index.
About the Prosperity Index: Now in its eighth year, the Index assesses 142 countries, representing more than 96% of the world’s population and 99% of the world’s GDP. Using rigorous research and in‐depth analysis, the Index ranks countries based on their performance in eight sub‐indices—Economy, Entrepreneurship & Opportunity, Governance, Education, Personal Freedom, Health, Safety & Security and Social Capital. The launch of the 2014 Legatum Prosperity Index™ will be marked with a presentation of findings, a panel discussion and evening reception.

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Environmental Film Screening & Discussion of "Extreme Realities: The Link Between Severe Weather, Climate Change, and Our National Security”
Wednesday, November 19
6–7:30 pm
Harvard, Belfer Building, 4th Floor, Land Hall, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Join us for the second installment of the 2014-15 HKS Environmental Film Series with "EXTREME REALITIES: The Link Between Severe Weather, Climate Change, and Our National Security." This 55-minute film examines the link between severe weather events and resulting civil unrest and the implications on our national security.

Before the screening, we will have introductory remarks by Harvard professor Dr. James J. McCarthy, a global climate expert and board chair, Union of Concerned Scientists. Discussants: LT Katie Burkhart, US Navy Reserve & HKS Master in Public Policy candidate & CAPT Michael A. Mullen, US Coast Guard & Harvard National Security Fellow. All three are concerned about climate change impact on the Arctic: Dr. McCarthy is a member of the US Arctic Research Commission; CAPT Mullen served as Executive Officer at Air Station Kodiak in Alaska; and LT Burkhart recently attended the 2014 Arctic Circle Assembly as a representative of Supreme NATO Allied Command.

"EXTREME REALITIES" illustrates how climate change impacts, such as hotter temperatures and rising sea levels, can act as the sparks contributing to events like the Arab Spring and even provide leverage for terrorism networks around the globe.

The documentary was produced by Emmy-Award winning filmmakers Marilyn and Hal Weiner, and narrated by Matt Damon. It premiered as the 13th episode of the award-winning PBS series Journey to Planet Earth and has won acclaim at film festivals around the world.

This timely film follows the recent release of the Department of Defense's 2014 Climate Change Adaptation Roadmap, which details their strategy for mitigating future effects of climate change on national security operations, both domestically and abroad. In the report, US Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel describes climate change as a threat that "will intensify the challenges of global instability, hunger, poverty, and conflict. They will likely lead to food and water shortages, pandemic disease, disputes over refugees and resources, and destruction by natural disasters in regions across the globe."

Pizza and refreshments served.

Co-Sponsor: Environment & Energy Professional Interest Council (EEPIC)

More at: http://green.harvard.edu/events/environmental-film-screening-discussion-extreme-realities-link-between-severe-weather-climate#sthash.dBH05RWn.dpuf

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Green Exchange: Sustainable Innovation
Wednesday, November 19
6:00 PM to 7:30 PM (EST)
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/green-exchange-sustainable-innovation-tickets-14143480531

"Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum on which to place it, and I shall move the world." - Archimedes
Join HEEC to discuss Sustainable innovations with SEM students and meet cleantech startups from the Boston Area!

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Cambridge’s Getting to Net Zero Task Force
Wednesday, November 19
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
Harvard, Sherman Fairchild Laboratory, 7 Divinity Avenue, Room G62, Cambridge

*All Task Force meetings are open to the public.
*Please feel free to forward this notice to others who might be interested.

Information on the Getting to Net Zero Task Force is available at www.cambridgema.gov/home/CDD/Projects/Climate/netzerotaskforce.aspx

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Designing the Food System of the Future
Wednesday, November 19
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
Boston University School of Management, 595 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
RSVP at http://www.meetup.com/branchfood/events/215412932/

How will we sustainably feed 10 billion people and how will investment and innovation help get us there?

Join Boston University’s School of Management, Feeding 10 Billion, The Food Loft, and Branchfood for an evening of lively discussion and a glimpse into the future of food and agriculture!

The evening is intended to inspire new collaborations and connections in the food and agriculture space. We’re bringing together entrepreneurs, investors, consumer experts and startup gurus to discuss the food system of the future. We'll hear multiple perspectives where opportunities exist to innovate, invest, and disrupt to create a better food system; one that not only feeds people, but also regenerates the environment and contributes to the health of individuals and communities.

Moderator
Kristen McCormack // Assistant Dean, Sector Initiatives // BU School of Management
Panelists
Aaron Niederhelman // Managing Director //Entrepreneur Agrarian Fund
Kate Demase // General Manager // Whole Foods Market
Paul Matteucci // Operating Partner // US Venture Partners and Founder of Feeding 10 Billion
Founding Team // The Food Loft

Schedule
6:00pm – 6:15pm Registration
6:15pm – 8:00pm Big idea presentations and panel discussion
8:00pm – 9:00pm Reception and networking

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Constructed Atmospheres:  Architecture as Meteorological Design
Wednesday, November 19
6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
swissnex Boston, 420 Broadway, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/constructed-atmospheres-architecture-as-meteorological-design-tickets-14224179905
Architect Philippe Rahm
Join us for the American book launch of Constructed Atmospheres: Architecture as Meteorological Design by Swiss Architect, Philippe Rahm.

The original vision on contemporary design and the encounter with other disciplines opens the architecture of Philippe Rahm to multiple possibilities. Constructed Atmospheres provides a selection of projects in which light, temperature, pressure, humidity, represent the ‘brick’ for a new discipline that can be defined by the term "meteorological design".

Philippe Rahm’s design is based on the principle that man faces reality from the inside and does not produce objects but atmospheres. The book provides a profile of the Swiss architect both as a theorist and as a designer, through the most recent works and a series of conversations conducted by Massimiliano Scuderi between 2011 and today. This book has been published with the support of Pro Helvetia (Swiss arts council).
Philippe Rahm is a Design Critic in Architecture at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design during the Fall 2014 semester, where he teaches the course “Built Climates”.

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Music Brings the Civil Rights Movement to Harvard Square
Wednesday, November 19
7pm
3 Church Street in Harvard Square, Cambridge

Fifty years ago the Civil Rights Movement, which was culminating nationally with the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, came to Harvard Square in music.  Club 47, predecessor to the current Club Passim, booked African American artists active in the Southern Civil Rights Movement.

What did these performers experience in Harvard Square?  How did their music resonate in Cambridge?

A panel including Betsy Siggins, who booked acts at Club 47 and Jack Landron, who performed as Jackie Washington, discusses the music that brought the Civil Right Movement home to Harvard Square.

More information at http://www.cambridgeforum.org/

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The Physics of Evolution: Equations shed new light on nature's mysteries
WHEN  Wed, November 19, 7pm – 10pm
WHERE  Armenise Amphitheater, 200 Longwood Avenue, Harvard Medical School, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Science in the News
CONTACT INFO sitnboston@gmail.com
DETAILS Science in the News (SITN) is a graduate student organization at Harvard University. We host interactive lectures on various science topics in the spring and fall. This lecture is a part of our fall lecture series, which are on Harvard’s Longwood campus. It consists of several PhD students presenting current research on a particular topic. Our seminars are open to audience members of any age, though a high school level of science education would be beneficial.
LINK http://sitn.hms.harvard.edu/seminar-series/

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Thursday, November 20
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Climate Change on Trial: The Lobster Boat Blockade
Thursday, November 20
12–1 pm
Harvard Law School, Austin 111

Last summer, Jay O'Hara and Ken Ward anchored their lobster boat in the path of a 40,000 ton coal freighter delivering coal to the largest coal plant in the Northeast. At their trial in September, they argued that their actions were necessary to prevent climate change. District Attorney Sam Sutter to dropped their criminal charges because, as he said, "Climate change is one of the gravest crises the planet has ever faced." Matt Pawa, environmental law expert and Legal Director of the Global Warming Legal Action Project, was one of the attorneys representing the activists. Join us for a panel discussion with Jay O'Hara, DA Sam Sutter, and Matt Pawa to hear this incredible story and discuss the role of civil disobedience in the fight for climate justice. Non-pizza lunch.

More at: http://green.harvard.edu/events/climate-change-trial-lobster-boat-blockade#sthash.W7fQxLJj.dpuf

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Assessing the Policies of Oil Rich States of the Gulf toward Development: Growth vs. Merit
WHEN  Thu., Nov. 20, 2014, 12 – 1:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Nye Conference Room A, Taubman Building, 5th Floor, 5 Eliot Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR The Middle East Initiative
SPEAKER(S)  A seminar with Abbas Al-Mejren, Kuwait University Professor of Economics and Kuwait Foundation Visiting Scholar at the Middle East Initiative
COST  Free and open to the public
LINK http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/events/6480/assessing_the_policies_of_oil_rich_states_of_the_gulf_toward_development.html

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Bad Economic Ideas—and Their Consequences
WHEN  Thu., Nov. 20, 2014, 3 – 4 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Kennedy School, Taubman 275, 5 Eliot Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Business, Ethics, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR HKS Progressive Caucus
SPEAKER(S)  Jeff Madrick, NY Times economics columnist, will discuss his new book, "Seven Bad Ideas--How Mainstream Economics Damaged America and the World”

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"Softening War? Sociocultural Knowledge, Military Strategy, and the Experience of Human Terrain Teams in Iraq and Afghanistan"
Thursday, November 20
3:00 to 4:30pm
Northeastern University, 310 Renaissance Park, 1135 Tremont Street, Boston

Paul Joseph, Tufts University

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From Ocean to Amazon: Our Human Story in Nature
Thursday, November 20
4:00p–5:00p
MIT, Building 32-G449, Patil Conference Room, 32 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Celine Cousteau
With a family legacy set in our oceans as a starting point and her own advocacy, films, and projects, Celine endeavors to connect humans to our natural world. She will share inspiring stories of ocean adventures from tagging sharks in the Great Barrier Reef, to diving the frigid waters of Antarctica, and helping free a whale caught in a fishing net. But her biggest project to date is set in the middle of the Brazilian Amazon in the indigenous territory of the Vale do Javari where the tribes who are fighting for their future have asked Celine for help.

Come take a journey with Celine from Ocean to Amazon - where exploration is an opportunity for understanding and adventure is the gateway to advocacy.

Celine Cousteau is founder and executive director of CauseCentric Productions, a non-profit organization creating cause focused multi-media content. Member of the World Economic Forum Council on Oceans, Celine holds a masters in International and Intercultural Management and is fluent in three languages.

Daughter of ocean explorer and filmmaker Jean-Michel Cousteau and granddaughter of the legendary Jacques Yves Cousteau, Celine has been the international spokeswoman for the La Prairie skincare company since 2007, guiding their marine conservation initiatives. In 2010, she started working with Contiki Holidays as their Sustainability Partner, is brand ambassador to Serengeti Sunglasses and is a Guest Designer for jewelry collections of an international brand.

Web site: https://calendar.csail.mit.edu/events/142994
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): CSAIL
For more information, contact:  Laura Moses
617-253-0145
lmoses@csail.mit.edu

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Ebola: Reporting on and Responding to an Evolving Outbreak
WHEN  Thu., Nov. 20, 2014, 4 – 5 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard School of Public Health, Kresge 502, 677 Huntington Avenue, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Health Sciences, Lecture, Science, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR HSPH Office of the Dean
SPEAKER(S)  Lindsey Baden, deputy editor, New England Journal of Medicine; associate professor of medicine, Harvard Medical School
LINK http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/deans-office/lecture-genomic-surveillance-of-the-2014-ebola-outbreak/

*RSVP not required.
**Non-Harvard ID holders should email cmartin@hsph.harvard.edu to request a visitor pass.

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The Politics of Displacement in the American City: A Conversation with Two Documentary Filmmakers
WHEN  Thu., Nov. 20, 2014, 6 – 7:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Land Hall, 4th Floor Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Film, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  King Williams, director, "The Atlanta Way"
Andrew Padilla, director, "El Barrio Tours: Gentrification USA"
Karilyn Crockett, director of economic policy & research, City of Boston
Quinton Mayne, assistant professor of public policy
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO maisie_obrien@hks.harvard.edu
DETAILS  At their best, cities can be places where people with different socio-economic and ethnic and racial backgrounds come together and use the ballot box and other political means to achieve a just and fair society. Likewise, city governments can use land-use and social policy, among other tools, to strengthen community life and improve access to basic goods and services. Yet often these same policies—both in the processes through which they are decided and in their ultimate effect on residents’ lives—exacerbate rather than reduce social exclusion and economic disparity.
Documentary film provides a powerful tool to explore the impact of urban policy, giving voice to alternative viewpoints—in particular those with perhaps the greatest stake and yet whose opinions are often excluded from traditional decision-making processes.
Join us for an evening with two accomplished documentary filmmakers whose work explores the challenges and potential of American cities and urban policy. Andrew J. Padilla, director of El Barrio Tours: Gentrification USA, and King Williams, director of The Atlanta Way, will share clips from their documentaries, discussing their craft as well as the motivation and message of their films, and engaging in what promises to be a lively conversation on how we might achieve the democratic potential of our cities.
LINK http://www.ash.harvard.edu/Home/Challenges-to-Democracy2/The-Politics-of-Displacement-in-the-American-City

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Relativity, Quantum Physics, and Graphene
WHEN  Thu., Nov. 20, 2014, 6 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Science Center Hall D, One Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Harvard Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Division of Science
SPEAKER(S)  Professor Philip Kim
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO science_lectures@fas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  The two most important achievements in physics in the 20th century were the discoveries of the theory of relativity and quantum physics. In 1928, Paul Dirac synthesized these two theories and wrote the Dirac equation to describe particles moving close to the speed of light in a quantum mechanical way, and thus initiated the beginning of relativistic quantum mechanics. Graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite discovered only a decade ago, has been providing physicists opportunities to explore an interesting analogy to relativistic quantum mechanics. The unique electronic structure of graphene yields an energy and momentum relation mimicking that of relativistic quantum particles, providing opportunities to explore exotic and exciting science and potential technological applications based on the flat carbon form. In this presentation Professor Kim will discuss the brief history of graphene research and its implications in science and technology.
LINK http://us9.campaign-archive2.com/?u=2a42f9e6c5264bb277175db04&id=3789f59eff&e=b0a7377146

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Earthos Conversation Series Topic #6 BIODIVERSITY
Thursday, November 20
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM (EST)
Earthos Lab, 1310 Broadway, Ground Floor, Somerville
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/earthos-conversation-series-topic-6-biodiversity-tickets-14269866555
$15 suggested donation

Please join us NOVEMBER 20th 6:00PM-9:00PM for an Earthos Conversation about
BIODIVERSITY and resilient, sustaining regional systems. How do we design our homes, communities, cities and regions while supporting the BIODIVERSITY that sustains all of us? We've invited thinkers and innovators from different arenas who are grappling with this question. Together, we'll explore emerging ideas and efforts in Boston, New England and beyond.

Each month, Earthos hosts a Conversation about a key resource at the New Earthos Lab for resilient and sustaining regions.  Each conversation focuses on a resource system, and how it relates to the other resources: food, water, energy, land, biodiversity, waste, and people.

The Earthos Lab brings people together to research, learn, and collaborate towards robust regional systems.

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“The Electric Car Vehicle/Driver Interface; the BMW i3 and other new cars”
Thursday, November 20
6:15 pm – 8:00 pm
Herb Chambers BMW of Boston, 1168 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
Pizza/soft drinks 6:15pm
Presentation 7pm

Herb Chambers BMW in Boston will be the site of the Consumer Electronics Society program on November 20. The electric car is becoming a major hub for consumer electronics. Here is an opportunity to see and hear about what BMW, Mercedes and other manufacturers are doing and may be planning.

Melissa Steffy, Manager of the BMW Dealership, and Mark Lande, Client Advisor will speak to us, and Melissa hints that Herb himself may attend.

Please register for badge and parking information to this free program by email to:
BosCESoc@gmail.com
Include:
Name
Company
E-mail address
Phone

More information at http://ieeeboston.org/event/electric-car-vehicledriver-interface-bmw-i3-new-cars/?instance_id=521

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The Birth of a Nation
Thursday, November 20
6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
C. Walsh Theatre, Suffolk University, 55 Temple Street, Boston

Dick Lehr (author, The Birth of a Nation)

For more information, call the Ford Hall Forum at 617-557-2007 or visit www.fordhallforum.org

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Design as Survival, Resistance, and Transformative Action
WHEN  Thu., Nov. 20, 2014, 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE   Harvard, Piper Auditorium, Gund Hall, 48 Quincy Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Art/Design, Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Harvard Graduate School of Design
DETAILS  The design practices that inspire social collaboration, participation, and coauthorship continue the avant-garde tradition of challenging outmoded thinking and perception while proposing and testing the visions of a beneficent social imagination. In this symposium, three artist-designers whose work critically reactivates this tradition will present and discuss their agenda, ideas, and projects. The panel will explore methodological approaches and concepts such as critical design, discursive design, interrogative design, and transformative design, currently being investigated in the Art, Design, and the Public Domain program at Harvard GSD. With Lucy Orta, Joep van Lieshout, and Rikke Luther; moderated by Krzysztof Wodiczko, Professor in Residence of Art, Design, and the Public Domain.
Supported by the Rouse Visiting Artist Fund.
LINK www.gsd.harvard.edu/#/events/panel-discussion-design-as-survival-resistance-and.html

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NEXPO: Northeastern’s Entrepreneurship Exposition
Thursday, November 20
6:30 pm - 9:00 pm
Northeastern, Cabot Center, 360 Huntington Avenue,  Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/nexpo-fall-2014-gew-2014-tickets-12696322041?aff=es2&rank=1Organizer

NEXPO is Northeastern’s premier entrepreneurship exposition. The culmination of Global Entrepreneurship Week, NEXPO will feature IDEA startups, product-based research projects, business ideas and an Entrepreneurship Pavilion. The event will celebrate the breadth of entrepreneurship throughout Northeastern’s campus and showcase all it has to offer.

Whether you’re a student who is curious about starting your own company or an industry professional looking to share your experiences, NEXPO provides the perfect platform to connect with entrepreneurship in Northeastern.

IDEA: Northeastern’s Venture Accelerator
idea@neu.edu
http://www.northeastern.edu/idea/
http://www.northeastern.edu/idea/event/nexpo/

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Things That Go Bump in the Night: What Do Whales See?
Thursday, November 20
7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Simons IMAX Theatre New England Aquarium, 1 Aquarium Wharf, Boston
RSVP at http://support.neaq.org/site/Calendar?id=105508&view=Detail

Dr. Scott D. Kraus, vice president, Research Department, New England Aquarium
To reduce or eliminate the problem of right whale entanglements in fishing gear, scientists and gear developers have considered the feasibility of enhancing ropes and nets to improve their detection by whales. To determine whether changing the color of the ropes alters the distance at which whales can detect them, we conducted three years of field trials in Cape Cod Bay in the spring months (2011-2013). Right whales appeared to change behavior in order to avoid the experimental “ropes,” suggesting that changing commercial fishing rope color may enhance the whale’s ability to visually avoid entanglements in the wild. Dr. Kraus will talk about whale vision generally, and then specifically address the feasibility of making fishing gear more visible.

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Friday, November 21
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New England Electricity Restructuring Roundtable Presents:
Gas Supply & Electricity Rates; and The Future of Demand Response
Friday, November 21
9 am to 12:30 pm
Foley Hoag LLP, 155 Seaport Boulevard, 13th Floor, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/1121-roundtable-gas-electricity-prices-demand-response-registration-13512511285
Cost:  $35-65
If you aren't able to attend in person, register at http://signup.clickstreamtv.com/event/raab/events/143 to live-stream the Roundtable or to watch it later on-demand.

Panel I: Gas Supply & Electricity Rates in New England
For our first panel, we return to the timely and contentious topic of  
Gas Supply & Electricity Rates in New England in light of important breaking developments, including:
The recent announcement by Spectra and Northeast Utilities of their proposed gas pipeline expansion project that would likely compete with the Kinder Morgan proposal;
MA DOER's undertaking of a low gas demand analysis (conducted by Synapse Energy Economics);
The soon-to-be-released Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative's electric and gas infrastructure study (conducted by Levitan & Associates); and
MA DPU's recent approval of a 37% electricity rate increase for National Grid basic service customers (due in no small part to the anticipated increase in electricity generation costs this coming winter due to constrained gas supplies-with a similar increase in NU's basic service rates likely to follow).
To discuss these recent developments and analyses, and their implications for gas supply and electricity prices in New England, we have put together a stellar panel, including:
Mark Sylvia, Undersecretary for Energy, MA EEA
James Daly, VP Energy Supply, Northeast Utilities
Peter Shattuck, Director Market Initiatives, ENE
Richard Levitan, President, Levitan & Associates, Inc.

Panel II: The Future of Demand Response in New England
Our second panel focuses on The Future of Demand Response in New England. This is also a timely topic, given the very recent Court of Appeals decision denying the FERC's petition for rehearing of an earlier court decision that calls into question FERC's jurisdiction over demand response in wholesale energy markets. If the court's earlier decision holds (i.e., either FERC doesn't appeal to the Supreme Court, the Supreme Court decides not to hear the case, or the Supreme Court sides with the Court of Appeals), this could also potentially spread to capacity markets and would likely effect ISO New England's plan to fully integrate demand response into the entire wholesale market by 2017. Moreover, this could result in pushing demand response down from federally-regulated wholesale markets to state-regulated retail markets. At the same time, the deployment of advanced metering infrastructure, the possibility of dynamic retail pricing, and the rapid development of intelligent devices could inspire new paradigms for price-responsive demand response.

To discuss these latest developments, trends, and potential fixes, we have put together a panel of leading thinkers and practitioners on demand response:
Scott Hempling, Attorney at Law, LLC
Henry Yoshimura, Director, Demand Resource Strategy, ISO New England
David Brewster, President and Co-Founder, EnerNOC
Paul Centolella, Principal, Centolella & Associates

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The Road Ahead: Forum of Future Cities
Friday, November 21
9:00a–4:30p
MIT, Building E-14, Media Lab 6th Floor, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge
RSVP at https://www.regonline.com/Register/Checkin.aspx?EventID=1619780
Cost:  $15 -$75

Self-driving vehicles. Drivers on demand. Data-driven infrastructure. Vehicles that respond to passengers and to the environment. A sea change is happening in transportation, and mobility of the (near) future will be radically different than today - greener, more comfortable and more efficient. Innovations are rolling out of laboratories, businesses and city halls on four, two, (or zero) wheels at an accelerating pace, exploring the future of urban mobility.

The spotlight is focused on transportation technology and design - the machines that move people - yet there are a host of unanswered questions as transitions are made. This year, California began issuing drivers licenses to self-driving cars, but insurance companies still can't find who is at fault when something goes wrong. Cities are debating whether ride sharing systems should be banned from their streets, while taxi companies organize strikes around the world to protest citizen-driver services like Lyft and Uber. Policy and innovation must go hand in hand for innovations to take hold.

The Road Ahead is not just about emerging technologies - it will be a forum on all dimensions of future urban mobility, bringing leading theorists, dreamers, and practitioners into conversation and debate.

Web site: http://senseable.mit.edu/roadahead
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): SENSEable City Lab, Department of Urban Studies and Planning
For more information, contact:  Jessica Ngo
617-324-4474
ngo_jess@mit.edu

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Cultural Survival Bazaar
Friday, November 21
12:00 PM - Sunday, November 23, 2014 at 6:00 PM
Cambridge College, 1000 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/cultural-survival-bazaar-tickets-13907332205

A Festival of Native Arts & Cultures from Around the World.
We feature Native artisans and performers, fairly traded products benefiting the livelihoods of artisans, projects in their communities, and fair trade. Shop unique art, jewelry, clothing, crafts, decor, tribal rugs, & much more. Enjoy "world" musicperformances, meet our guest artisans, travel the world in one place.
Cultural Survival offers several free admission events this holiday season. Each event provides you with direct access to thousands of items, handmade by Indigenous artisans from around the world.
Every item has a deeper story from the projects it supports, to the artisans who made them. Learn about our work in partnership with communities around the world.  Together we work to defend Indigenous rights, lands, languages, and cultures.
For details visit our website at http://bazaar.cs.org
Promo Video: http://youtu.be/xRKch6HeFTM

For more information, contact Dave Favreau at 617-441-5400 x21 or dave@cs.org

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Cloud, Fog and the Maintenance of Ecosystems: Mist Connections
Friday, November 21
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Harvard, Pierce Hall 100F, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Kathleen Weathers
Speaker Bio:  http://www.caryinstitute.org/science-program/our-scientists/dr-kathleen-c-weathers

Email: emarais@seas.harvard.edu

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Transnational Homeland Security?
WHEN  Fri., Nov. 21, 2014, 12 – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Weil Town Hall, 1st Floor Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Business, Law, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business & Government, Harvard Kennedy School
SPEAKER(S)  Alan Bersin, assistant secretary for international affairs and chief diplomatic officer and acting assistant secretary for policy, U.S. Department of Homeland Security
COST  Free; RSVP to mrcbg@hks.harvard.edu

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IACS Seminar: Part 1: "Tree-like Structure in Social and Information Networks" & Part 2: "Data-mining for development”
WHEN  Fri., Nov. 21, 2014, 1 – 2 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Maxwell Dworkin G115, 33 Oxford Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Information Technology, Lecture, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Institute for Applied Computational Science (IACS), Harvard SEAS
SPEAKER(S)  Aaron Adcock & Shankar Kalyanaraman of Facebook
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO nrbaker@seas.harvard.edu
DETAILS  Talk 1:
It is often noted that social and information networks exhibit tree-like structure and properties. In the past few years several tools have been developed to more closely quantify this structure. I will discuss some of the results of applying these tools to real-world social and information networks. In particular, I will discuss two alternatives for measuring this structure: Gromov hyperbolicity and tree-width.
Talk 2:
Over the last few years, we have witnessed innovative uses of big data to model and predict complex human behavior and patterns. Google's use of search query data to accurately forecast flu incidence and Ushahidi's crowdsourced crisis maps following the Haiti earthquake in 2010 for quicker and more effective deployment of humanitarian aid are two leading examples in this domain. My research interests draw inspiration from these examples; and in this talk, I will showcase some previous work I have done in disease surveillance and post-conflict violence prevention.
In the end, time-permitting, we’ll briefly chat about data science at Facebook.
LINK  http://iacs.seas.harvard.edu/iacs-seminars

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Global Convergences: Strategies Against Evictions & Displacement
Friday, November 21
2:00p–6:00p
MIT, Building E-15, Bartos Theater, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

This global conference, hosted by the MIT Displacement Research Action Network and Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung-NYC, will draw together leading activists, civil society leaders, and academics from Brazil, India, South Africa and the US, as well as global policy figures from the UN system, to discuss strategies against the increasing incidence of development-induced evictions and displacement.

Web site: http://www.rosalux-nyc.org/beyond-displacement-a-global-convergence/
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free
Tickets: http://www.rosalux-nyc.org/beyond-displacement-a-global-convergence/
Sponsor(s): Department of Urban Studies and Planning, Displacement Research Action Network, Rosa Luxemburg Stiftung-NYC
For more information, contact:  Balakrishnan Rajagopal
braj@mit.edu

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"Energy and the Industrial Revolution: Past, Present, and Future"
Friday, November 21, 2014
3:00p–4:00p
MIT, Building 34-101

Speaker: Arun Majumdar, Jay Precourt Professor, Stanford University
Arun Majumdar is the Jay Precourt Professor at Stanford University, where he serves on the faculty of the Department of Mechanical Engineering and is a Senior Fellow of the Precourt Institute for Energy.

Prior to joining Stanford, he was the Vice President for Energy at Google, where he created several energy technology initiatives and advised the company on its broader energy strategy. He continues to be a consultant to Google on energy.

In October 2009, Dr. Arun Majumdar was nominated by President Obama and confirmed by the Senate to become the Founding Director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E), where he served till June 2012. Between March 2011 and June 2012, Dr. Majumdar also served as the Acting Under Secretary of Energy, and a Senior Advisor to the Secretary of Energy.

Prior to joining the Department of Energy, Dr. Majumdar was the Almy and Agnes Maynard Chair Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley and the Associate Laboratory Director for Energy and Environment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. His research career includes the science and engineering of nanoscale materials and devices as well as large engineered systems.

Hoyt C. Hottel Lecture in Chemical Engineering

Web site: http://web.mit.edu/cheme/news/hottel/index_2014.html
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Chemical Engineering Department
For more information, contact:  Melanie Kaufman
617-253-6500
melmils@mit.edu 

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Growth in Alternative Fuel Vehicles and Solar Markets
Friday, November 21
5:00p–6:30p
MIT, Building 3-333, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: Tim Echols, Georgia Public Service Commissioner
Tim Echols, Georgia's elected Public Service Commissioner, will discuss and share data on the adoption of various alternative fuels vehicles, and the impact of utility PEV rates and EPA mandates on people's energy habits and adoption rates.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): MIT Energy Club
For more information, contact:  MIT Energy Club
energyclub@mit.edu

Editorial Comment:  Georgia is one state where the Tea Party and the Greens have worked together to keep legislation and regulation from hobbling the adoption of rooftop solar.

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Restoring Ecosystems to Reverse Global Warming
November 21-23, 2014
Friday, 6-9 p.m. - Saturday, 9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. - Sunday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Tufts University, Cohen Auditorium, 40 Talbot Avenue, Medford
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/biodiversity-for-a-livable-climate-restoring-ecosystems-to-reverse-global-warming-tickets-12190027701
Cost:  $50-150

Promoting the power of nature to remove excess carbon from the atmosphere where it does untold damage, and restore it to the soils where it supports abundant life and reverses global warming.

We are telling a new story.  Each of our speakers presents a chapter in the remarkable narrative of life on earth in the 21st century.  We humans are a key part of that narrative, and while there are many parts they all come together in a single tale.  We will weave those parts together so that each presentation is part of the whole, a whole that builds a different and more hopeful worldview than we’ve heard in a long time.  We have a lot of work to do and heavy paradigms to shift, but we can and will tell the new story with exciting and hopeful outcomes.

Our Boston conference has a roster of expert speakers followed by an international series of events bringing together climate advocates, farmers, ranchers, scientists, social scientists, policymakers, NGOs, artists, visionaries and the general public – in other words, any and all of us – for a non-technical discussion to consider:
The exceptional potential of the biosphere to address all of our current emissions, as well as to remove the 125 parts per million of excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.
Effective action on a global scale by applying eco-regenerative approaches to lands and waters worldwide.
The use of biological systems to re-establish healthy water cycles to cool the earth’s surface.

Our primary urgent goal in the face of widespread breakdown in addressing climate change is to further the understanding necessary to embark on the global regeneration process made possible by enabling the forces of biology. Collectively we will present affordable strategies for eco-restoration that local, national and international governments, agencies, communities and individuals may rapidly implement in order to reverse global warming.

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Monday, November 24
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Too Big To Fail or Too Hard to Remember: Lessons from the New Deal and the Triumph, Tragedy, and Lost Legacy of James M. Landis
WHEN  Mon., Nov. 24, 2014, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Law School, Milstein East B, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Business, Ethics, Humanities, Law, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics
SPEAKER(S)  Judge Jed Rakoff, South District of New York
Justin O'Brien, Edmond J. Safra Visiting Lab Fellow
Dan Coquillette, Charles Warren Visiting Professor of American Legal History, Harvard Law School
Todd Rakoff, Byrne Professor of Administrative Law, Harvard Law School
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO katy@ethics.harvard.edu
LINK http://ethics.harvard.edu/event/panel-discussion-james-m-landis

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MASS Seminar - Giuseppe Torri (Harvard)
Monday, November 24
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus)

Giuseppe Torri (Harvard)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): MIT Atmospheric Science Seminars
For more information, contact:  MASS organizing committee
mass@mit.edu

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Panel discussion: Carbon Capture and Sequestration: Obstacles and Possibilities
Monday, November 24
12pm-1:30pm
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, HKS, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

Ric Redman, President & CEO, Summit Power Group, LLC
David Keith, Gordon McKay Professor of Applied Physics (SEAS); Professor of Public Policy (HKS)

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"Economics Inside the Grid: Smart Grids, Power Systems Engineering, and Emergent Markets"
Monday, November 24
12:15PM - 2:00PM
Harvard, Room 100F, Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Canay Özden-Schilling, MIT, HASTS

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/
Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to sts@hks.harvard.edu by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

Contact Name:  sts@hks.harvard.edu
More at: http://environment.harvard.edu/events/2014-11-24-171500-2014-11-24-190000/sts-circle-harvard#sthash.xlWCdgxi.dpuf

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Imperfect Markets versus Imperfect Regulation in U.S. Electricity Generation
Monday, November 24
2:30p–4:00p
MIT, Building E62-450, 100 Main Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Steve Cicala (University of Chicago)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): IO Workshop
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal@mit.edu

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Planets and Life:  Welcome to the Anthropocene, The Human Palate for Energy, Land, and Water Under Global Change: What and Where are the Risks?
Monday, November 24
4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
MIT, Building 2-105, 182 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Adam Schlosser (MIT)

Planets and Life: Human and Planetary Perspectives
Weekly lecture and discussion series exploring the co-evolution of the earth's natural systems and life

Web site: http://eapsweb.mit.edu/events/2014/planets-life
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS) Lectures
For more information, contact:  Vlada Stamenkovic
rinsan@mit.edu

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Hope for a Livable Climate:  The Promise of Restorative Grazing to Regenerate Soil and Reverse Global Warming
Monday, November 24
6 pm, Socializing and Refreshments, 7-9 pm, Presentations
University Lutheran Church, 66 Winthrop Street, Cambridge
Free and open to the public, donations requested.

An educational fundraiser to benefit two organizations on the forefront of ecological restoration and climate change, Biodiversity for a Livable Climate
and the Africa Centre for Holistic Management, Zimbabwe

African Musical Entertainment
Program
Keynote: Precious Phiri, Africa Center for Holistic Management, “Life with the People Who Will Change Everything”
William Moomaw, Earthwatch and Tufts University, “Policy and How the World Turns”
Richard Teague, Texas A&M, “New Science on the Ground: Soils, Carbon and Climate”
Seth Itzkan, Planet-TECH Associates, “Envisioning a Restorative Future”
Adam Sacks, Biodiversity for a Livable Climate, “Jumping Off a Cliff, Landing in a Lifeboat”

Precious Phiri is a Senior Facilitator at the Africa Centre for Holistic Management (ACHM) in Zimbabwe.  Precious directs training for villages in the Hwange Communal Lands region that are implementing restorative grazing programs using Holistic Land and Livestock Management. This helps rural communities in Africa to reduce poverty, rebuild soils, and restore food and water security. This nature-based solution has been successfully used on different landscapes in Africa and the Americas. Precious was born and raised in one of the communities now implementing restorative grazing.
Sponsored by Biodiversity for a Livable Climate and Planet-TECH Associates
www.bio4climate.org 
www.planet-tech.com

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regenarratives
Monday, November 24
7:00p–9:00p
MIT, Building E15-070, Bartos Theatre, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Gabriel Kahan
Multi-screen, rapid consumption of content is opening up new ways to communicate and engage viewers, in particular youth. At the same time, the complexities of modern social dynamics require one to develop novel ways of thinking about the role of government. Creating content that is both informative and adaptable to the user is key if we are to engage youth in understanding and working with government to solve our most pressing issues.

Drawing upon his experience delivering new media content to millions of users in the developing world, Kahan engages in open-ended discussion with the audience about the need for repurposing the narrative form to educate, inspire, and identify the next big ideas for governance and civil society in the 21st century.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Department of Architecture
For more information, contact:  Ilse Damkoehler
617-253-5229
act@mit.edu

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Tuesday, November 25
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Unpacking open data: power, politics and the influence of infrastructures
Tuesday, November 25
12:30 pm
Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard, 23 Everett Street, Second Floor, Cambridge
RSVP required for those attending in person at http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/events/luncheon/2014/11/davies#RSVP
Event will be webcast live on http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/events/luncheon/2014/11/davies at 12:30 pm.

Tim Davies, Berkman Affiliate
Countries, states & cities across the globe are embracing the idea of 'open data': establishing platforms, portals and projects to share government managed data online for re-use. Yet, right now, the anticipated civic impacts of open data rarely materialise, and the gap between the promise and the reality of open data remains wide. This talk, drawing on a series of empirical studies of open data around the world, will question the ways in which changing regimes around data can reconfigure power and politics, and will explore the limits of current practice. It will consider opportunities to re-imagine the open data project, not merely as one of placing datasets online, but as one that can positively reshape the knowledge infrastructures of civic life.

About Tim
Tim Davies is a social researcher with interests in civic participation and civic technologies. He has spent the last five years focussing on the development of the open government data landscape around the world, from his MSc work at the Oxford Internet Institute on Data and Democracy, the first major study of data.gov.uk, through to leading a 12-country study on the Emerging Impacts of Open Data in Developing Countries for the World Wide Web Foundation.

Tim is working on his PhD on the interaction of technical infrastructures and public policies in shaping the outcomes of open data initiatives in the Web Science Doctoral Training Centre at the University of Southampton, and was a 2013/14 fellow at the Harvard Berkman Center for Internet and Society. He also co-directs Practical Participation, an independent consultancy working on participation, organisational change, community development and social technology, through which he recently led the development of the 360Giving standards for philanthropic open data in the UK.

Tim lives in Oxford, UK, blogs at timdavies.org.uk, and tweets as @timdavies.

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Food on the Rails: The Golden Era of Railroad Dining
Tuesday, November 25
6:00pm
Radcliffe Room, Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Yard, 3 James Street, Cambridge

Jeri Quinzio
In roughly one hundred years – from the 1870s to the 1970s – dining on trains began, soared to great heights, and then fell to earth.

The founders of the first railroad companies cared more about hauling freight than feeding passengers. The only food available on trains in the mid-nineteenth century was whatever passengers brought aboard in their lunch baskets or managed to pick up at a brief station stop. It was hardly fine dining.

Seeing the business possibilities in offering long-distance passengers comforts such as beds, toilets, and meals, George Pullman and other pioneering railroaders like Georges Nagelmackers of Orient Express fame, transformed rail travel. Fine dining and wines became the norm for elite railroad travelers by the turn of the twentieth century. The foods served on railroads – from consommé to turbot to soufflé, always accompanied by champagne - equaled that of the finest restaurants, hotels, and steamships.

After World War II, as airline travel and automobiles became the preferred modes of travel, elegance gave way to economy. Canned and frozen foods, self-service, and quick meals and snacks became the norm. By the 1970s, the golden era of railroad dining had come grinding to a halt.
Food on the Rails traces the rise and fall of food on the rails from its rocky start to its glory days to its sad demise. Looking at the foods, the service, the rail station restaurants, the menus, they dining accommodations and more, Jeri Quinzio brings to life the history of cuisine and dining in railroad cars from the early days through today.

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Film Screening: ART21 "Secrets" (2014)
Tuesday, November 25
7:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building E15-070, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Join the List for a free screening to celebrate the newest season of ART21 "Art in the Twenty-First Century", the award-winning documentary series that showcases contemporary art and artists.

The episode "Secrets" examines how artists make the invisible visible. What hidden elements persist in artists' work? Is it the artist's role to reveal them, or not? Featured in this episode is artist Trevor Paglen, who completed a residency project at the MIT in 2011 which culminated in the project "The Last Pictures"; discover the work of artists Elliot Hundley and Arlene Shechet, as well.

This event is part of ART21 Access '14, a worldwide initiative providing unprecedented access to contemporary artists through preview screenings of ART21 "Art in the Twenty-First Century" Season 7. ART21 is a nonprofit organization dedicated to making the world a more creative place through the work and words of living artists.

Web site: http://listart.mit.edu/events-programs/film-screening-art21-art-twenty-first-century-secrets-2014
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): List Visual Arts Center, ART21
For more information, contact:  Mark Linga
617-253-4680
listinfo@mit.edu 


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Upcoming Events
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Friday, November 28
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Chain Reaction
Friday, November 28
1 – 4 PM
MIT, Rockwell Cage Gymnasium, 120 Vassar Street, Cambridge
RSVP at http://mit.universitytickets.com/user_pages/event.aspx?id=364&cid=&p=1
Cost:  Spectators: $15 at door/$12.50 presale for adults; $5 for children ages 5-17, students, seniors and MIT ID-holders.
Free for children under 5.
Spectator fee includes free same-day admission to the MIT Museum, open until 6:00 p.m.

What is the Friday After Thanksgiving Chain Reaction? A grand event that could only happen at MIT! Participants link their chain reaction devices together forming one mega chain reaction – set off at the end as the event's thrilling culmination.

More than 1,500 people attend this fun-for-all-ages "extreme" event!

Making a chain reaction allows people to explore their own creativity and see how their unique contraptions relate to a larger whole. No matter how unique the devices, inevitably, with a little string and duct tape, they all work together beautifully.

How does it work?
Join the fun as a spectator or, even better, as a participant! Participants must register in advance to create their own contraptions and bring them to Rockwell Cage on Friday, November 28. Artist and inventor Arthur Ganson, renowned chain reaction creator, will be on hand, along with local artist and MIT alumnus Jeff Lieberman, to help participants link their contraptions together and emcee the event.

Can anybody do it?
Of course! Participants range from Girl Scout troops to artists and engineers, from MIT clubs to high schools and family teams. Teams have come from as far away as Michigan and California!

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Monday, December 1
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Financing Energy Innovation: Government Grants, Private Equity, and Entrepreneurs
Monday, December 1
12pm-1:30pm
Harvard, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, HKS, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
 
Sabrina T. Howell, Harvard Environmental Economics Program Fellow and Harvard University Ph.D. Student

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"Democracy and the Deep-Sea: Telepresence and Public Participation in Remote Environments"
Monday, December 1
12:15PM - 2:00PM
Harvard, Room 100F, Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Zara Mirmalek, Harvard, STS Fellow

STS Circle at Harvard
http://sts.hks.harvard.edu/events/sts_circle/
Sandwich lunches are provided. Please RSVP to sts@hks.harvard.edu by Wednesday at 5PM the week before.

Contact Name:   sts@hks.harvard.edu
More at: http://environment.harvard.edu/events/2014-12-01-171500-2014-12-01-190000/sts-circle-harvard#sthash.s2eBce30.dpuf

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Health Insurance Plan Choice
Monday, December 1
4:00p–5:30p
MIT, Building E62-650, 100 Main Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Jonathan Gruber (MIT)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Public Finance/Labor Workshop
For more information, contact:  economics calendar
econ-cal@mit.edu 

Editorial Comment:  Jonathan Gruber has been in the news a bit lately.  Could be an interesting discussion.

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Planets and Life Series: Welcome to the Anthropocene, Panel: Whither the Earth: Hands off? Geoengineer? Or Biosphere 3?
Monday, December 1
4:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building 2-105, 182 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: With Samuel Bowring (MIT), Daniel Schrag (Harvard), David Keith (Harvard)
Planets and Life: Human and Planetary Perspectives
Weekly lecture and discussion series exploring the co-evolution of the earth's natural systems and life

Web site: http://eapsweb.mit.edu/events/2014/planets-life
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS) Lectures
For more information, contact:  Vlada Stamenkovic
rinsan@mit.edu

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The old city and the sea-- Boston landmaking meets sea level rise
Monday, December 1
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM
BSA Space, 290 Congress Street, Suite 200, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-old-city-and-the-sea-boston-landmaking-meets-sea-level-rise-tickets-13955141203

Speakers: Nancy Seasholes and Julie Wormser, moderated by Mike Ross

Boston Living with Water (http://www.bostonlivingwithwater.org) is a website managed by the Boston Redevelopment Authority, The Boston Harbor Association and the Boston Society of Architects.  Here you will find resources, educational forums and details on Boston’s international design competition, held from October 29, 2014 through June 2015.

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Tuesday, December 2
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The Eureka Myth: Creators, Innovators and Everyday Intellectual Property
Tuesday, December 2
12:30 pm
Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, 23 Everett Street, Second Floor, Cambridge
RSVP required for those attending in person at http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/events/luncheon/2014/12/silbey#RSVP
Event will be webcast live on http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/events/luncheon/2014/12/silbey at 12:30 pm.

Jessica Silbey, Suffolk University Law School
The book analyzes and elaborates upon a qualitative empirical study of artists, scientists, engineers, lawyers and businesspeople that investigates the motivations and mechanisms of creative and innovative activity in everyday professional life. Based on over fifty face-to-face interviews, the book centers on the stories told by interviewees describing how and why they create and innovate and whether or how IP law plays a role in their activities. The goal of the empirical project was to figure out how IP actually works in creative and innovative fields, as opposed to how we think or say it works (through formal law or legislative debate). Breaking new ground in its qualitative method examining the economic and cultural system of creative and innovative production, The Eureka Myth draws out new and surprising conclusions about the sometimes misinterpreted relationships between creativity, invention and intellectual property protections.

About Jessica Silbey
Professor Silbey's scholarship draws from her interdisciplinary background in the humanities and law. One of her interests is in intellectual property law, particularly in the investigation of "IP communities:" activities, groups and organizations with a particular creative or innovative focus. She studies the common and conflicting narratives within those communities in relation to intellectual property law and legal institutions that purport to regulate them. She is especially interested in the connections between cultural narratives of creation, discovery, incentive and labor and their legal counterparts in IP communities, statutes and legal cases. The empirical dimension of this project (conducting and analyzing interviews with artists, scientists and intellectual property professionals) will be published by Stanford University Press in 2014.

Another of her interests is in the interrelationship of law and film in legal practice and popular culture. Her research and writing in this area investigates how film and video are used as legal tools and how they become objects of legal analysis. A long-time interest since she was a graduate student in literature and film, her work explores questions such as: how does automated surveillance film become testimony in a court of law? How do cultural perceptions about film and video affect their evaluation by jurors, advocates and judges? How might legal actors and lay citizens mobilize the audiovisual technology of our twenty-first century to further the promises of our justice system? A current project in this area concerns ultrasound technology and the politics of reproductive choice.

Professor Silbey teaches courses in constitutional law and intellectual property.

Professor Silbey received her B.A. from Stanford University and her J.D. and Ph.D. (Comparative Literature) from the University of Michigan. Before joining the faculty of Suffolk University Law School, Professor Silbey was a litigator at the law firm of Foley Hoag LLP in Boston. She also served as a law clerk to the Honorable Robert E. Keeton on the United States District Court for the District of Massachusetts and to the Honorable Levin Campbell on the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit.

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"Protecting the Global Commons: The Role of International Financial Institutions"
Tuesday, December 2
12:30PM - 2:00PM
Harvard, Bowie-Vernon Conference Room (K262), CGIS Knafel Building, 1737 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

 with Naoko Ishii, Chairperson and CEO, Global Environmental Facility, the World Bank Group. Moderator: Susan Pharr. Edwin O. Reischauer Professor of Japanese Politics, and Director, WCFIA Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, Harvard University

WCFIA Program on U.S.-Japan Relations Seminar

Contact Name:   Shinju Fujihira
sfujihira@wcfia.harvard.edu
More at: http://environment.harvard.edu/events/2014-12-02-173000-2014-12-02-190000/wcfia-program-us-japan-relations-seminar#sthash.2Vj69LVo.dpuf

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xTalks: Book Release Celebration - Art of Insight in Science & Engineering
Tuesday, December 2,
3:30p–4:30p
MIT, Building 10-105, (Bush Room), 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Sanjoy Mahajan
MIT Press author and ODL colleague Sanjoy Mahajan will discuss why we humans, to master the complexity of our world, need insight rather than precision. He'll also discuss the inspiration for publishing his book under a free license (CC-BY-NC-SA). Copies of Mahajan's books will be available for sale at 20% discount, as well as Vijay Kumar & Toru Iiyoshi's Opening Up Education, Peter Suber's Open Access, and others.

xTalks: Digital Discourses
xTalks provides a forum to facilitate awareness, deep understanding and transference of educational innovations at MIT and elsewhere. We hope to foster a community of educators, researchers, and technologists engaged in developing and supporting effective learning experiences through online learning environments and other digital technologies.

Web site: http://odl.mit.edu/events/sanjoy-mahajan/
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): OEIT- Office of Educational Innovation and Technology
For more information, contact:  Molly Ruggles
617-324-9185
ruggles@mit.edu

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Conditions of violence in Central America and their effects on emigration from that region
Tuesday, December 2
4:30p–6:00p
MIT, Building E40-464, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Louisa Reynolds, 2014-2015 IWMF Elizabeth Neuffer Fellow

A session of the Myron Weiner Seminar Series on International Migration.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies, Inter-University Committee on International Migration
For more information, contact:  Phiona Lovett
253-3848
phiona@mit.edu 

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Film Screening: ART21 "Fiction" (2014)
Tuesday, December 2
7:00p–8:00p
MIT, Building E15-070, 20 Ames Street, Cambridge

Join the List for a free screening to celebrate the newest season of ART21 "Art in the Twenty-First Century", the award-winning documentary series that showcases contemporary art and artists.

The episode "Fiction" examines how artists tell compelling stories. How do artists disrupt everyday reality in the service of revealing subtler truths? This episode features artists who explore the virtues of ambiguity, mix genres, and merge aesthetic disciplines to discern not simply what stories mean, but how and why they come to have meaning.

Featured in this episode is artist and MIT Professor Emerita Joan Jonas, who will be representing the US in the 2015 Venice Biennale; the List and Director Paul Ha are organizing the exhibition. "Fiction" also highlights the work of artists Katharina Grosse and Omer Fast. 

This event is part of ART21 Access '14, a worldwide initiative providing unprecedented access to contemporary artists through preview screenings of ART21 "Art in the Twenty-First Century" Season 7. ART21 is a nonprofit organization dedicated to making the world a more creative place through the work and words of living artists.

Web site: http://listart.mit.edu/events-programs/film-screening-art21-art-twent
y-first-century-secrets-2014
Open to: the general public

Sponsor(s): List Visual Arts Center, ART21
For more information, contact:  Mark Linga
617-253-4680
listinfo@mit.edu 

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Pretty Faces (FREE admission)
Tuesday, December 2
7:30p
MIT, Building 26-100, Access Via 60 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Pretty faces is an all female ski film featuring the best athletes from around the world in celebration of playing outside, pushing the sport of skiing and living up to our fullest potential as a supportive community. Inspired by the desire to offer young girls role models and inspiration to play outside, this film aims to capture all the girl stoke from the pioneers who have paved the way to the "never-evers" who will continue to define what it means to ski like a girl.

Web site: http://lsc.mit.edu/schedule/2014.4q/desc-prettyfaces.shtml
Open to: the general public
Cost: free
Sponsor(s): LSC, MITOC, Graduate Women at MIT (GWAMIT)
For more information, contact:  MIT Lecture Series Committee
617-253-3791
lsc@mit.edu
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Wednesday, December 3
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Nanotechnology in the Development of Future Nano electronics
Wednesday, December 3
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building 34-401, 50 Vassar Street, Cambridge
Light lunch at 11:30am

Speaker: Dr. Meyya Meyyappan, NASA
Carrier transport in vacuum is the fastest and vacuum devices are inherently radiation resistant. We have developed nanoscale vacuum transistors by entirely using silicon technology and the devices have the potential for THz electronics. This talk will also cover our recent efforts in flexible electronics.

Meyya Meyyappan is Chief Scientist for Exploration Technology at NASA Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, CA. His research interests include carbon nanotubes, graphene, and various inorganic nanowires, their growth and characterization, and application development in chemical and biosensors, instrumentation, electronics and optoelectronics. He is a Fellow of IEEE, MRS, AVS, ECS and AIChE.

MTL Seminar Series

Web site: http://www.mtl.mit.edu/seminars/fall2014.html
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Microsystems Technology Laboratories
For more information, contact:  Valerie DiNardo
253-9328
valeried@mit.edu 

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Meeting Tomorrow’s Energy Challenges: Why Technology will Define our Energy Future
WHEN  Wed., Dec. 3, 2014, 12:15 – 1:15 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Kennedy School, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Environmental Sciences, Lecture, Science, Sustainability
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR The Harvard Environmental Economics Program is co-sponsoring the talk with the Consortium for Energy Policy Research at Harvard University.
SPEAKER(S)  Francesco Starace, CEO and general manager, Enel Group
LINK http://heep.hks.harvard.edu/event/meeting-tomorrow’s-energy-challenges-why-technology-will-define-our-energy-future-mr

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"Learning by Doing in Solar Photovoltaic Installations"
Wednesday, December 3
4:10PM - 5:30PM
Harvard, L-382 (3rd Floor Littauer Building), 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

 with Kenneth Gillingham, Yale University

Seminar in Environmental Economics and Policy
http://www.hks.harvard.edu/centers/mrcbg/news-events/event-calendar
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Plastic Pollution in our Oceans
Wednesday, December 3
5:00p–6:00p

Speaker: Marcus Eriksen, PhD

TBA

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): GSC Meetings
For more information, contact:  Cherry Gao
cherryg@mit.edu 

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Urban Infrastructures for Public Health: Conversation on Civic Tech
Wednesday, December 3
 5:30 PM to 7:30 PM (EST)
District Hall, 75 Northern Avenue, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/urban-infrastructures-for-public-health-conversation-on-civic-tech-registration-14024514701

This Conversation on Civic Tech aims to explore how a city can take an innovative look at public health. While data and technology play a key role in tracking the flu and assisting collaboration among researchers and physicians, technology can also be a useful tool in driving wellness and even economic growth in Boston.

In October, Microsoft was honored to host the second annual Hacking Pediatrics event. The range of innovative ideas that came out of the event was inspiring: from end-to-end childhood vaccine management to accurate, rapid fabrication of custom tracheostomy tubes for children to better ways to manage asthma and monitor use of inhalers. How can we apply the creativity, collaboration and innovation that all come together at a hackathon to public health?

At the fourth in the series of conversations on Civic Tech, we plan to address the following questions:
How does city infrastructure – signage and bike paths – enable public health and wellness? 
What role does public health play in the innovation economy in Boston through job creation and industry innovation?
How can collection and analysis of data improve services for citizens and patients?
What technology exists today to collect, analyze or visualize public health data? And what other technologies do we need?
We are bringing together people from various parts of the public and private communities to spark the conversation and then invite the attendees to engage in the discussion. Speaker list will be added as names are confirmed.

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Thursday, December 4
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Environmental Seminar Series
Thursday, December 4
4:00p–5:00p
MIT, Building 48-316, 15 Vassar Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Dr. Steve Wofsy , Harvard

Environmental Sciences Seminar Series
Join us for a weekly series of environmental topics by MIT faculty and students, as well as guest lecturers from around the globe.

Web site: https://sites.google.com/site/parsonsseminars/home
Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Parsons Lab, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Parsons Laboratory
For more information, contact:  Rebecca Fowler
617-253-7101
ceed@mit.edu

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TechHub Boston Demo Night - December 2014
Thursday, December 4
6:30 PM to 9:00 PM (EST)
Harpoon Brewery & Beer Hall, 306 Northern Avenue, Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/techhub-boston-demo-night-december-2014-tickets-13552091671

Demo Night is a chance to see what the top StartUps are working on, these are the people that are changing the future of business & tech! Come by and chat with this exciting community group while enjoying free beer and preztels at Harpoon, Boston's best brewery (in our minds).

Each startup has 5 minutes to demo their product in front of a live audience, it's not a pitch but an opportunity for each company to explain (and show) what they have been working on. After each Demo there is live Q&A with the audience.

After the Demo, stick around for a pint and more networking.

Location - Harpoon Brewery Beer Hall & Event Room
6:30 - Doors open
7:00 - Grab some food & drink while listening to presenters demo
8:00 - Networking
9:00 - Continue into the Beer Hall

Interested in demoing your product @ TechHub Demo Night? Get in touch at simon.towers@techhub.com

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Farmed Seaweed: The Next Great Sustainable Seafood?
Thursday, December 4
7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Simons IMAX Theatre New England Aquarium, 1 Aquarium Wharf, Boston
RSVP at http://support.neaq.org/site/Calendar?id=105509&view=Detail

Matt Thompson, aquaculture project lead, Conservation Department, New England Aquarium, and 2013 John H. Cunningham Award Winner
“Is seaweed the next kale?” asked an article promoting seaweed as a health food, but what of its potential as a sustainable seafood? Seaweed farming is one of the largest segments of the global aquaculture industry, which includes a small but growing US contingent. Seaweeds have the potential to be farmed with few environmental impacts and inputs, but they have received little attention in the sustainable seafood movement and aren’t commonly found on US dinner plates.

In an effort to gain a fuller understanding of farmed seaweed, Matt applied for the 2013 John H. Cunningham Award, a professional development program for Aquarium staff to further their knowledge in a particular area. His finding swill be shared during this talk; he will focus on the sustainability of seaweed farming, including recent visits to US and Chinese seaweed farms, and in doing so, ask how we embrace seaweed as a sustainable seafood.

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Friday, December 5
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MassHack Winter 2014
MassHack
Friday, December 5, 2014 at 8:00 AM - Sunday, December 7, 2014 at 6:00 PM (EST)
Microsoft New England Research and Development Center, 1 Memorial Drive, Cambridge
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/masshack-winter-2014-tickets-9325108651

Hackathons are all about innovation. Innovation fuels the economy and helps solve some of the day’s greatest challenges. We need more innovation and to help drive this we are creating one of the largest community driven hackathon.

Developed to be able to bring competitive teams of one-to-six developers into a structured 48-hour applications development environment, MassHack brings the best of the Left Coast’s hackathons together with the venture capital and academic communities of the Right Coast. The Boston metropolitan area has long been home to cool and creative companies, and now we have a world-class competition to challenge the best and brightest.

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Quantification of emissions from various sectors in the oil and gas industry: methane and cohorts
Friday, December 5
12:00pm to 1:00pm
Harvard, Pierce Hall 100F, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Scott Herndon
Speaker Bio: http://www.aerodyne.com/employees/scott-c-herndon

Atmospheric Sciences Seminar

Email: rcommane@seas.harvard.edu

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Sustainable Development in Asia
Friday, December 5
12:30 PM to 2:00 PM (EST)
Tufts, Cabot 703, 160 Packard Avenue, Medford
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/sustainable-development-in-asia-tickets-14208823975

Nathan Perry, Assistant Professor at Colorado Mesa University
Sara Hsu, Assistant Professor at SUNY New Paltz
The authors will discuss their recent book series examining sustainable development in six countries in Asia, including China, Taiwan, Japan, and South Korea. They will explore various social, economic, and environmental regulations and practices related to issues of biodiversity, income inequality, healthcare, and water pollution and consumption. The authors will review progress in these areas and compare each pair of countries to highlight policy recommendations.
Lunch will be served. Please RSVP

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Playing For The Planet
Friday, December 5
7:00 pm
The Community Church Of Boston, 565 Boylston Street (Copley Square), Boston
RSVP at http://www.eventbrite.com/e/playing-for-the-planet-improvisors-against-climate-change-tickets-13841288667
Admission is $20; $15 students & seniors

The tenth “Playing For The Planet” benefit concert showcases master musicians from three different musical traditions in a rare evening of pan-cultural improvisation, with all proceeds going to benefit the environmental advocacy group 350MA.org.  The performers include Nima Janmohammadi, a contemporary master of Persian classical music; Triarky, a brilliant jazz “power trio” featuring violinist Mimi Rabson and the electric tuba of David Harris; and the Hindustani classical singing of Warren Senders, with George Ruckert & Amit Kavthekar. The music begins at For information, please call 781-396-0734, or visit the event website at www.warrensenders.com.

“Playing For The Planet: Improvisors Against Climate Change” is the tenth concert in an ongoing series of cross-cultural concerts conceived as a way for creative musicians to contribute to the urgent struggle against global warming. Their choice of beneficiary, 350MA.org, is focused on building global consensus on reduction of atmospheric CO2 levels — which climatologists agree is necessary to avoid catastrophic outcomes.

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Opportunity
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The Boston Network for International Development (BNID) maintains a website (BNID.org) that serves as a clearing-house for information on organizations, events, and jobs related to international development in the Boston area. BNID has played an important auxiliary role in fostering international development activities in the Boston area, as witnessed by the expanding content of the site and a significant growth in the number of users.

The website contains:

A calendar of Boston area events and volunteer opportunities related to International Development
- http://www.bnid.org/events
A jobs board that includes both internships and full time positions related to International Development that is updated daily - http://www.bnid.org/jobs
A directory and descriptions of more than 250 Boston-area organizations - http://www.bnid.org/organizations

Also, please sign up for our weekly newsletter (we promise only one email per week) to get the most up-to-date information on new job and internship opportunities -www.bnid.org/sign-up

The website is completely free for students and our goal is to help connect students who are interested in international development with many of the worthwhile organizations in the area.

Please feel free to email our organization at info@bnid.org if you have any questions!

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SOMERVILLE ROVING ART EVENTS BUS

We are looking for folks to help us program our new M.U.S.C.R.A.T. Bus (Multi Use Somerville Community Roving Art Transport).

About the MUSCRAT
The city of Somerville, led by the Somerville Arts Council, has bought an old school bus, which has been transformed into a Multi Use Somerville Community Roving Art Transport (M.U.S.C.R.A.T). We anticipate that the inside will be used to conduct roaming art classes, performance art or dance, while the outside could be used to screen films or host concerts. The intent for our M.U.S.C.R.A.T. is to create a flexible roving catalyst for creation.

Perhaps you'd like to…
create a comix workshop for youth in an underserved area; this might take place at Mystic River Housing, for example
produce a dance performance in or around the bus in an unlikely location
host a public craft night inside the bus

We look forward to hearing your ideas!

Official Call
For more details and the official call to Producers, go here: http://somervilleartscouncil.org/muscrat

Rachel Strutt, Program Manager, Somerville Arts Council
p: 617.625.6600, x2985 f: 617.666.4325
www.somervilleartscouncil.org
Visit Nibble, a blog about food & culture at
www.somervilleartscouncil.org/nibble

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Intern with Biodiversity for a Livable Climate!
Biodiversity for a Livable Climate (BLC) is a nonprofit based in the Cambridge, MA area. Our mission is to mobilize the biosphere to restore ecosystems and reverse global warming.
Education, public information campaigns, organizing, scientific investigation, collaboration with like-minded organizations, research and policy development are all elements of our strategy.

Background: Soils are the largest terrestrial carbon sink on the planet. Restoring the complex ecology of soils is the only way to safely and quickly remove carbon from the atmosphere and store it in the ground, where it’s desperately needed to regenerate the health of billions of acres of degraded lands. Restoring carbon to soils and regenerating ecosystems are how we can restore a healthy hydrologic cycle and cool local and planetary climates safely, naturally, and in time to ensure a livable climate now and in the future.

Our Work: immediate plans include
Organizing the First International Biodiversity, Soil Carbon and Climate Week, October 31-November 9, 2014, and a kick-off conference in the Boston area, “Mobilizing the Biosphere to Reverse Global Warming: A Biodiversity, Water, Soil Carbon and Climate Conference – and Call to Action” to expand the mainstream climate conversation to include the power of biology, and to help initiate intensive worldwide efforts to return atmospheric carbon to the soils.
Coordination of a global fund to directly assist local farmers and herders in learning and applying carbon farming approaches that not only benefit the climate, but improve the health and productivity of the land and the people who depend on it.
Collaboration with individuals and organizations on addressing eco-restoration and the regeneration of water and carbon cycles; such projects may include application of practices such as Holistic Management for restoration of billions of acres of degraded grasslands, reforestation of exploited forest areas, and restoring ocean food chains.

Please contact Helen D. Silver, helen.silver@bio4climate.org for further information.
781-316-1710
Bio4climate.org
SharedHarvestCSA.com

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Climate Stories Project
http://www.climatestoriesproject.org

What's your Climate Story?
Climate Stories Project is a forum that gives a voice to the emotional and personal impacts that climate change is having on our lives. Often, we only discuss climate change from the impersonal perspective of science or the contentious realm of politics. Today, more and more of us are feeling the effects of climate change on an personal level. Climate Stories Project allows people from around the world to share their stories and to engage with climate change in a personal, direct way.

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Where is the best yogurt on the planet made? Somerville, of course!

Join the Somerville Yogurt Making Cooperative and get a weekly quart of the most thick, creamy, rich and tart yogurt in the world. Membership in the coop costs $2.50 per quart. Members share the responsibility for making yogurt in our kitchen located just outside of Davis Sq. in FirstChurch.  No previous yogurt making experience is necessary.

For more information checkout.
https://sites.google.com/site/somervilleyogurtcoop/home

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Cambridge Residents: Free Home Thermal Images

Have you ever wanted to learn where your home is leaking heat by having an energy auditor come to your home with a thermal camera?  With that info you then know where to fix your home so it's more comfortable and less expensive to heat.  However, at $200 or so, the cost of such a thermal scan is a big chunk of change.

HEET Cambridge has now partnered with Sagewell, Inc. to offer Cambridge residents free thermal scans.

Sagewell collects the thermal images by driving through Cambridge in a hybrid vehicle equipped with thermal cameras.  They will scan every building in Cambridge (as long as it's not blocked by trees or buildings or on a private way).  Building owners can view thermal images of their property and an analysis online. The information is password protected so that only the building owner can see the results.

Homeowners, condo-owners and landlords can access the thermal images and an accompanying analysis free of charge. Commercial building owners and owners of more than one building will be able to view their images and analysis for a small fee.

The scans will be analyzed in the order they are requested.

Go to Sagewell.com.  Type in your address at the bottom where it says "Find your home or building" and press return.  Then click on "Here" to request the report.

That's it.  When the scans are done in a few weeks, your building will be one of the first to be analyzed. The accompanying report will help you understand why your living room has always been cold and what to do about it.

With knowledge, comes power (or in this case saved power and money, not to mention comfort).

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Free solar electricity analysis for MA residents
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/viewform?formkey=dHhwM202dDYxdUZJVGFscnY1VGZ3aXc6MQ

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HEET has partnered with NSTAR and Mass Save participating contractor Next Step Living to deliver no-cost Home Energy Assessments to Cambridge residents.

During the assessment, the energy specialist will:

Install efficient light bulbs (saving up to 7% of your electricity bill)
Install programmable thermostats (saving up to 10% of your heating bill)
Install water efficiency devices (saving up to 10% of your water bill)
Check the combustion safety of your heating and hot water equipment
Evaluate your home’s energy use to create an energy-efficiency roadmap
If you get electricity from NSTAR, National Grid or Western Mass Electric, you already pay for these assessments through a surcharge on your energy bills. You might as well use the service.

Please sign up at http://nextsteplivinginc.com/heet/?outreach=HEET or call Next Step Living at 866-867-8729.  A Next Step Living Representative will call to schedule your assessment.

HEET will help answer any questions and ensure you get all the services and rebates possible.

(The information collected will only be used to help you get a Home Energy Assessment.  We won’t keep the data or sell it.)

(If you have any questions or problems, please feel free to call HEET’s Jason Taylor at 617 441 0614.)

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Sustainable Business Network Local Green Guide

SBN is excited to announce the soft launch of its new Local Green Guide, Massachusetts' premier Green Business Directory!

To view the directory please visit: http://www.localgreenguide.org
To find out how how your business can be listed on the website or for sponsorship opportunities please contact Adritha at adritha@sbnboston.org

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Free Monthly Energy Analysis

CarbonSalon is a free service that every month can automatically track your energy use and compare it to your past energy use (while controlling for how cold the weather is). You get a short friendly email that lets you know how you’re doing in your work to save energy.

https://www.carbonsalon.com/

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Boston Food System

"The Boston Food System [listserv] provides a forum to post announcements of events, employment opportunities, internships, programs, lectures, and other activities as well as related articles or other publications of a non-commercial nature covering the area's food system - food, nutrition, farming, education, etc. - that take place or focus on or around Greater Boston (broadly delineated)."

The Boston area is one of the most active nationwide in terms of food system activities - projects, services, and events connected to food, farming, nutrition - and often connected to education, public health, environment, arts, social services and other arenas.   Hundreds of organizations and enterprises cover our area, but what is going on week-to-week is not always well publicized.
Hence, the new Boston Food System listserv, as the place to let everyone know about these activities.  Specifically:
Use of the BFS list will begin soon, once we get a decent base of subscribers.  Clarification of what is appropriate to announce and other posting guidelines will be provided as well.

It's easy to subscribe right now at https://elist.tufts.edu/wws/subscribe/bfs

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Artisan Asylum  http://artisansasylum.com/

Sprout & Co:  Community Driven Investigations  http://thesprouts.org/

Greater Boston Solidarity Economy Mapping Project  http://www.transformationcentral.org/solidarity/mapping/mapping.html
a project by Wellesley College students that invites participation, contact jmatthaei@wellesley.edu

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Bostonsmart.com's Guide to Boston  http://www.bostonsmarts.com/BostonGuide/

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Links to events at 60 colleges and universities at Hubevents   http://hubevents.blogspot.com

Thanks to

Fred Hapgood's Selected Lectures on Science and Engineering in the Boston Area:  http://www.BostonScienceLectures.com

MIT Events:  http://events.mit.edu

MIT Energy Club:  http://mitenergyclub.org/calendar

Harvard Events:  http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/harvard-events/events-calendar/

Harvard Environment:  http://www.environment.harvard.edu/events/calendar/

Sustainability at Harvard:  http://green.harvard.edu/events

Mass Climate Action:  http://www.massclimateaction.net/calendar/events/index.php

Meetup:  http://www.meetup.com/

Eventbrite:  http://www.eventbrite.com/

Microsoft NERD Center:  http://microsoftcambridge.com/Events/

Startup and Entrepreneurial Events:   http://www.greenhornconnect.com/events/

High Tech Events:  http://harddatafactory.com/Johnny_Monsarrat/index.html

Cambridge Civic Journal:  http://www.rwinters.com

Cambridge Happenings:  http://cambridgehappenings.org

Boston Area Computer User Groups:  http://www.bugc.org/

Arts and Cultural Events List:  http://aacel.blogspot.com/

Boston Events Insider:  http://bostoneventsinsider.com/boston_events/

Nerdnite:  http://boston.nerdnite.com/