Sunday, May 01, 2016

Energy (and Other) Events - May 1, 2016

Energy (and Other) Events is a weekly mailing list published most Sundays covering events around the Cambridge, MA and greater
Boston area that catch the editor's eye.

Hubevents  http://hubevents.blogspot.com is the web version.

If you wish to subscribe or unsubscribe to Energy (and Other) Events email gmoke@world.std.com
What I Do and Why I Do It:  The Story of Energy (and Other) Events

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Index
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Full event information follows the Index and notices of my latest writings.

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Monday, May 2
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11:30am  Political Turbulence: How Social Media Shape Collective Action
12pm  MIT Atmospheric Science Seminar (MASS) - Christiane Jablonowski, Michigan
12pm  Energy Cooperation in China’s “One Belt One Road” Initiative
2:30pm  The Psychological Lives of the Poor
2:30pm  Why is Pollution from U.S. Manufacturing Declining? The Roles of Trade, Regulation, Productivity, and Preferences
3pm  After Ukraine, After Syria: What's Next?
4pm  One Plus One Equals One: Historical and Modern Perspectives on the Evolution of Eukaryotic Photosynthesis
4pm  Womenomics and Economic Reconstruction: A View from Fukushima
4pm  Human Decisions and Machine Predictions: An Exploration of using Machine Learning for Policy
4pm  Thinking Fast Makes Changing Slow, Lydia Villa-Komaroff, MIT STS Morison Prize Lecture
4:10pm  Roundtable Discussion on the Future of Technology and Democracy
4:15pm  The Logic, Urgency and Promise of Tackling Climate Change
5pm  Raise A Stink Gas Leaks Campaign Kick-off
5pm  Reflections on Emerging Microbial Threats
5pm  Haiti: Voice, Gender and Representation in the Aftermath of Disaster
5pm  Stories from the Shadows: Reflections of a Street Doctor
5:30pm  ArtWeek Opening Reception Party
6pm  Discovering Home: An Evening with the Silk Road Ensemble
7pm  The Mechanical Horse:  How the Bicycle Reshaped American Life

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Tuesday, May 3
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8am  Boston TechBreakfast: Paperflite, thoughtbot, MobileLeads LLC, and More!
12pm  Black 2.0: the New Liberation Movement
4pm  How "New" is the New National Front?:  Mapping Out Marine Le Pen's Rhetorical Turn With Digital Humanities Software 
5pm  Common Ground for Health: Precision, Personalized, and Social Medicine
5:30pm  Askwith Forum - Teens and Sex: Navigating from Shame and Regret to Integrity and Wellness
6pm  TED Talks:  The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking
6pm  e4Dev Weekly Speaker Series: The Next Step of Program Evaluations: Conducting Impact Assessments in Development Projects 
6pm  The Momentum towards Sustainability and Challenges Facing Youth
7pm  Code for Boston Spring Demo Night!

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Wednesday, May 4
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Harvard SEAS [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences] Design & Project Fair
10:30am  Webinar:  Community Food Rescue: A Model to Feed More and Waste Less
12pm  Finding common standards for the Right to be Forgotten: Challenges and Perspective
12:30pm  Ghost Cities: the Role of Citizens and the Government
4pm  Research at Microsoft: Beyond the Horizon
4pm  Tag Gas Leaks in Cambridge
4:10pm  The Politics of the Latino Vote: Immigration and the Run Up to 2016
4:30pm  Opportunities in Industrial Water treatment - by Prakash Govindan, CTO, Gradiant
5:30pm  Deans' Challenge Demo Day
5:30pm  New England Water Innovation Network Water Pitch Night
6pm  Black Lives Matter
7pm  Danny Hillis speaking on The Long Now and the 10-000-year Clock
7pm  Planting in a Post-Wild World, a talk by Claudia West, co-author of "Planting in a Post-Wild World”

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Thursday, May 5
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12pm  MechE Innovation Day: "Design Revolution”
3:30pm  Modeling Contributions to CO2 Measured at a Site in Northern China (2005-2009)
4pm  Tag Gas Leaks in Cambridge
4:45pm  An Economist's Take on Climate Change: The Paris Agreement and the Post-2020 World
5pm  Creative Industries Innovation
5pm  Virtual Reality Meets Documentary: A Deeper Look
5:30pm  Askwith Forum - Engineering Personalized Learning: The Story of Summit Schools and Facebook
5:30pm  EnergyBar!
6pm  Natural and Induced Earthquakes: The Hidden Threat to Large Cities in the United States
6pm  RPP Colloquium: The Evolving Field of Religious Peacebuilding: Tanenbaum's Peacemakers in Action, Volume II
6:45pm  Killer Drones: an evening of info and response
7pm  Helping Boston Prepare for Sea Level Rise

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Friday, May 6
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8am  Petrie-Flom Center's 2016 Annual Conference: Big Data, Health Law, and Bioethics
10am  The State of Hydropower Projects Today: Lessons from the Past for the Course Ahead
12pm  CarbonTracker-Lagrange: A Framework for Greenhouse Gas Flux Estimation at Regional to Continental Scales
3pm  From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime:  The Making of Mass Incarceration in America
4pm  D-Lab Spring Student Showcase & Open House

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Saturday, May 7
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11am  International Drone Day
12pm  Wake Up the Earth Festival
1pm  Success: the only choice
2pm  The Economics of Climate Change: 10 Years on from the Stern Review
3:15pm  Building a Business Community Institution to Fight Corruption

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Monday, May 9
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7am  2016 Mercury Solar Transit - LIVE
8:30am  BU Conference on Sustainability Research
12pm  MIT Atmospheric Science Seminar (MASS) - Isaac Held, Princeton
12pm  Competing at Innovative Speed: Why Is It So Darn Hard?
4pm  Making New Materials From Synthetically Modified Proteins
5pm  Is Islamophobia accelerating global warming?
6pm  Resilience, Climate, Race, and Relationships: One Journey. One Future. One…

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Tuesday, May 10
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9:30am  Olin College of Engineering SCOPE SUMMIT 2016:  Featuring Rocket Talks & Poster Sessions
12pm  Applying network science for public health: Toward 'social' communication strategies
2pm  Webinar: Making Solar More Accessible Through Innovation 
4:15pm  How Much Is One American Worth? A Lecture by Diana C. Mutz
5:30pm  Institute for Applied Computational Science Project Showcase
6pm  Boston New Technology May 2016 Startup Showcase #BNT65
6:30pm  Changing America - Twenty Years of Democracy Now!

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My rough notes on some of the events I go to and notes on books I’ve read are at:

Alinsky’s Tactical:  Rules for Radicals

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Monday, May 2
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Political Turbulence: How Social Media Shape Collective Action
Monday, May 2
11:30am to  1:00pm
Harvard, Maxwell Dworkin 119, 33 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Helen Margetts  (University of Oxford)
Abstract: How does the changing use of social media affect politics? In a recent book - Political Turbulence, Princeton University Press, 2016 - Helen Margetts and colleagues Peter John, Scott Hale and Taha Yasseri show how social media are now inextricably intertwined with the political behaviour of ordinary citizens, and exert an unruly influence on the political world. As people go about their daily lives, they are invited to undertake 'tiny acts' of political participation (liking, sharing, tweeting, retweeting, following, uploading, viewing, signing and so on) which extend the ladder of participation at the lower end. These micro-donations of time and effort can scale up to large mobilizations – most fail, but some succeed rapidly and dramatically through a series of chain reactions. When deciding whether to participate, people are exposed to web-based social influence, such as social information about the participation of others, and visibility. Different types of people (personality types for example) have different responses to these forms of social influence. The book uses large-scale data and data science approaches including experimentation to explore how such dynamics inject turbulence into the political world, with mobilization characterized by instability, unpredictability and often unsustainability. The talk will discuss the implications of these findings both for political science research and the future of the modern state.

Bio:   Helen Margetts is the Director of the OII, and Professor of Society and the Internet at Oxford. She is a political scientist specialising in digital era governance and politics, investigating political behaviour, digital government and government-citizen interactions in the age of the internet, social media and big data. She has published over a hundred books, articles and major research reports in this area, including Political Turbulence: How Social Media Shape Collective Action (with Peter John, scott Hale and Taha Yasseri, 2015); Paradoxes of Modernization (with Perri 6 and Christopher Hood, 2010); Digital Era Governance (with Patrick Dunleavy, 2006); and The Tools of Government in the Digital Age (with Christopher Hood, 2007). In 2003 she and Patrick Dunleavy won the ‘Political Scientists Making a Difference’ award from the UK Political Studies Association, in part for a series of policy reports on Government on the Internet for the UK National Audit Office (1999, 2002 and 2007), and she continues working to maximise the policy impact of her research. She sits on the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on the Future of Government and is editor-in-chief of the journal Policy and Internet. She is a fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences. From 2011- 2014 she held the ESRC professorial fellowship ‘The Internet, Political Science and Public policy: Re-examining Collective Action, Governance and Citizen-Governance Interactions in the Digital Era’.

Professor Margetts joined the OII in 2004 from University College London where she was a Professor in Political Science and Director of the School of Public Policy. She began her career as a computer programmer and systems analyst with Rank Xerox after receiving her BSc in mathematics from the University of Bristol. She returned to studies at the London School of Economics and Political Science in 1989, completing an MSc in Politics and Public Policy in 1990 and a PhD in Government in 1996. She worked as a researcher at LSE from 1991 to 1994 and a lecturer at Birkbeck College, University of London from 1994 to 1999.

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MIT Atmospheric Science Seminar (MASS) - Christiane Jablonowski, Michigan
Monday, May 2
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus)

The MIT Atmospheric Science Seminar Series [MASS] is a student-run weekly seminar series. Topics include all research concerning the atmosphere and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars usually take place on Mondays in 54-915 from 12.00-1pm unless otherwise noted (term-time only). Talks are generally followed by a lunch with graduate students. Besides the seminar, individual meetings with professors, postdocs, and students are arranged. The seminar series is run by graduate students and is intended mainly for students to interact with individuals outside the department, but faculty and postdocs certainly participate. 2015/2016 co-ordinators: Marianna Linz (mlinz@mit.edu) and John Agard (jvagard@mit.edu). mass@mit.edu reaches the list. 

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Marianna Linz
617-253-2127

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Energy Cooperation in China’s “One Belt One Road” Initiative
Monday, May 2
12:00PM TO 1:30PM
Harvard. Bell Hall, 5th Floor, Belfer Building, Bell Hall, 5th Floor, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge

with Kaho Yu, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, HKS.

This series is presented by the Energy Technology Innovation Policy/Consortium for Energy Policy Research at the Kennedy School of Government. Lunch will be provided.

HKS Energy Policy Seminar Series

Contact Name:  Louisa Lund


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The Psychological Lives of the Poor
Monday, May 2
2:30p–3:30p
MIT, Building  6-120, 182 Memorial Drive (Rear), Cambridge
Live webcast

Speaker: Sendhil Mullainathan
The D2P2 Lecture Series' inaugural talk will feature Sendhil Mullainathan (Harvard University), who will discuss "The Psychological Lives of the Poor," showcasing his research on scarcity and its impact on mental bandwidth and decision-making. The event is open to the general public and will be live webcast. 
Professor Mullainathan is the co-author of Scarcity: Why Having Too Little Means So Much, a book acclaimed by The Economist as "novel in its scope and ambition." In this book, Mullainathan and coauthor, Eldar Shafir, demonstrate that scarcity creates a similar psychology for everyone struggling to manage with less than they need. Busy people fail to manage their time efficiently for the same reasons the poor and those maxed out on credit cards fail to manage their money. The dynamics of scarcity reveal why dieters find it hard to resist temptation, why students and busy executives mismanage their time, and why sugarcane farmers are smarter after harvest than before. Once we start thinking in terms of scarcity and the strategies it imposes, the problems of modern life come into sharper focus. 

This lecture provides a new way of understanding why the poor stay poor and the busy stay busy, and it reveals not only how scarcity leads us astray but also how individuals and organizations can better manage scarcity for greater satisfaction and success.

D2P2: Data. Decisions. Public Policy. 
The D2P2 Lectures feature leading academics and other experts who share knowledge derived from modern applied economics research to demonstrate how it can inform better public policy decision-making. Speakers will discuss their groundbreaking research and practice, and how it can be applied to improve people's lives.

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free 
Sponsor(s): J-PAL, MIT Economics Department
For more information, contact:
6173247255

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Why is Pollution from U.S. Manufacturing Declining? The Roles of Trade, Regulation, Productivity, and Preferences
Monday, May 2
2:30p–4:00p
MIT, Building E52-532, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Joe Shapiro (Yale)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): International Seminar
For more information, contact:  economics calendar

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After Ukraine, After Syria: What's Next?
Monday, May 2
3:00p–5:00p
MIT, Building E40-496, 1 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Andrei Kortunov

Focus On Russia lecture series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Center for International Studies
For more information, contact:  Harlene Miller
617-258-6531

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One Plus One Equals One: Historical and Modern Perspectives on the Evolution of Eukaryotic Photosynthesis
WHEN  Mon., May 2, 2016, 4 – 5 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Biological Labs, Lecture Hall, 16 Divinity Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Science
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Harvard University
SPEAKER(S)  John Archibald, Dalhousie University
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS Plant Biology Initiative Special Lecture

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Womenomics and Economic Reconstruction: A View from Fukushima
WHEN  Mon., May 2, 2016, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Belfer Case Study Room (S020), Japan Friends of Harvard Concourse, CGIS South Building, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Program on U.S.-Japan Relations
SPEAKER(S)  The Honorable Masako Mori, Member, House of Councillors. Former Minister of State for Gender Equality, and former Minister of State for Consumer Affairs and Food Safety
Moderated by Susan Pharr, Edwin O. Reischauer Professor of Japanese Politics and Director, WCFIA Program on U.S.-Japan Relations, Harvard University
COST  Free and open to the public

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Human Decisions and Machine Predictions: An Exploration of using Machine Learning for Policy
Monday, May 2
4:00p–5:30p
MIT, Building E51-335, 2 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Sendhil Mullainathan (Harvard University)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Development Economics Seminar
For more information, contact:  economics calendar

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Thinking Fast Makes Changing Slow, Lydia Villa-Komaroff, MIT STS Morison Prize Lecture
Monday, May 2
4:00p–6:00p
MIT, Building E14, Winter Garden Room, and Lecture Room, 6th Floor, 75 Amherst Street, Cambridge

Speaker: Lydia Villa-Komaroff, Ph.D.

Morison Prize Lecture 

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): HASTS
For more information, contact:  Gus Zahariadis
617-253-3452

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Roundtable Discussion on the Future of Technology and Democracy
WHEN  Mon., May 2, 2016, 4:10 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Ash Center, 124 Mt. Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Humanities, Information Technology, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Ash Center for Democratic Governance & Innovation
SPEAKER(S)  2015-16 Technology and Democracy fellows
Moderated by Archon Fung, Ford Foundation Professor of Democracy and Citizenship, and Academic Dean, Harvard Kennedy School
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS  Join the 2015-16 Technology and Democracy fellows for a roundtable discussion on the future of civic tech, their work in and outside of the fellowship program, and the Technology and Democracy Fellowship.

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The Logic, Urgency and Promise of Tackling Climate Change
Monday, May 2
4:15 pm
Harvard, CGIS-S020, Belfer Case Study Room, 1730 Cambridge Street, Cambridge

The Energy History Project hosts Nicholas Stern, London School of Economics, who will discuss "The Logic, Urgency and Promise of Tackling Climate Change."


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Raise A Stink Gas Leaks Campaign Kick-off
Monday, May 2
5pm
Cambridge City Hall, Cambridge

Meet on the steps outside Cambridge City Hall for our campaign kick-off! Together we'll tag our first leak -- conveniently located right on the corner, hear from our mayor, and take a photo with city and state officials.  Then we'll gather inside Sullivan Chamber for the start of the City Council meeting, where we'll make a brief show-and-tell about gas leaks.  Wear your t-shirt (or buy one at the event).  

TEAM UP TO TAG LEAKS!

Mothers and grandmothers are raising a stink about underground gas leaks in Massachusetts. Leaking methane is speeding up climate change, killing trees, and wasting energy. More than 20,000 leaks statewide cost $100 million per year. And our utilities are passing the cost along to us! Mothers Out Front: Mobilizing For a Livable Climate is tagging Cambridge leaks May 4th and 5th. Join us! rsvp Kristine at kejelstrup@gmail.com. MothersOutFront.org #fixtheleaksma

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Reflections on Emerging Microbial Threats
Monday, May 2 
5:00 pm 
MIT, Building 1-190, 33 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Prof. James M. Hughes, Emory University School of Medicine and Rollins School of Public Health

Pre-lecture Reception: 4:30pm.

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Haiti: Voice, Gender and Representation in the Aftermath of Disaster
Monday, May 2
5:00p–6:30p
MIT, Building 14E-304, 160 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speakers: Kaiama L. Glover and Charles Forsdick
Professor Kaiama L. Glover (Barnard College) 
Professor Glover joined the Barnard College faculty in 2002. Her teaching and research interests include francophone literature, particularly that of Haiti and the French Antilles; colonialism and postcolonialism; and sub-Saharan francophone African cinema. 
Professor Charles Forsdick (University of Liverpool) 
Charles Forsdick is James Barrow Professor of French at the University of Liverpool. He has published widely on travel writing, colonial history, postcolonial literature and the cultures of slavery. He is also a specialist on Haiti and the Haitian Revolution, and has written widely about representations of Toussaint Couverture.

MIT Global France Seminar

Open to: the general public
Cost: 0 
Sponsor(s): MIT Global Studies and Languages
For more information, contact:  Lisa Hickler
617-452-2676

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Stories from the Shadows: Reflections of a Street Doctor
WHEN  Mon., May 2, 2016, 5 p.m.
WHERE  Minot Room, 5th Floor, Countway Library, 10 Shattuck Street, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Health Sciences, Lecture, Science, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
SPEAKER(S)  James J. O’Connell, president of the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program
DETAILS  Three decades ago, Jim O’Connell was fresh out of Harvard Medical School and on his way to a prestigious oncology fellowship at Sloan-Kettering. His mentor, a legendary Boston doctor-humanitarian, asked him to head up a new pilot medical program ̶ Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP).
O’Connell thought he’d put in a few years, then get back on track with his “real” career. But he fell in love with the challenges of homeless medicine, his patients and their stories. The stories are collected in a book, Stories from the Shadows.
Please join us to hear more from this internationally recognized leader in the field of homeless medicine.
Refreshments will be served

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ArtWeek Opening Reception Party
Monday, May 2
5:30 PM to 7:30 PM (EDT)
CIC Boston, 50 Milk Street, 17th and 18th Floors, Boston

To kick off our annual CIC Arts Week across our three Boston and Cambridge locations, join us for an evening of art, music, food, and drinks. 

Our opening reception "pARTy" will showcase exhibits from esteemed local artists, including Adam O'Day, Felipe Ortiz, Luti Castro and Warren Croce. Join us for walking art tours, collaborative mural projects, live entertainment from Berklee musicians, and much more. 

Be sure to come hungry! Our partners from Boston's leading food-tech community Branchfoodwill be providing tasty samples from a dozen local and innovative food startups on the 17th floor. 

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Discovering Home: An Evening with the Silk Road Ensemble
WHEN  Mon., May 2, 2016, 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Ed Portal, 224 Western Avenue, Allston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Art/Design, Music, Special Events
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS  Join members of the Silk Road Ensemble for an evening of music, food, and exploring notions of home through distinct traditions and personal stories. Starting from a focus on Japan, these renowned musicians will reflect on their journeys and traditions and will explore the unexpected places and paths where Ensemble members—of Japanese origins and beyond--have found home.
The Silk Road Ensemble is in residence at Harvard University. Their new album, Sing Me Home, consciously explores what it means to be home through crossing cultural boundaries. The album was developed and recorded alongside the new documentary feature The Music of Strangers: Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble from director Morgan Neville, following members of the Ensemble as they gather in locations across the world, exploring the ways art can both preserve traditions and shape cultural evolution. For more information, visit silkroadproject.org.

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The Mechanical Horse:  How the Bicycle Reshaped American Life
Monday, May 2
7:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Margaret Guroff
With cities across the country adding miles of bike lanes and building bike-share stations, bicycling is enjoying a new surge of popularity in America. It seems that every generation or two, Americans rediscover the freedom of movement, convenience, and relative affordability of the bicycle. The earliest two-wheeler, the draisine, arrived in Philadelphia in 1819 and astonished onlookers with the possibility of propelling themselves "like lightning." Two centuries later, the bicycle is still the fastest way to cover ground on gridlocked city streets.

Filled with lively stories, The Mechanical Horse reveals how the bicycle transformed American life. As bicycling caught on in the nineteenth century, many of the country's rough, rutted roads were paved for the first time, laying a foundation for the interstate highway system. Cyclists were among the first to see the possibilities of self-directed, long-distance travel, and some of them (including a fellow named Henry Ford) went on to develop the automobile. Women shed their cumbersome Victorian dresses—as well as their restricted gender roles—so they could ride. And doctors recognized that aerobic exercise actually benefits the body, which helped to modernize medicine. Margaret Guroff demonstrates that the bicycle's story is really the story of a more mobile America—one in which physical mobility has opened wider horizons of thought and new opportunities for people in all avenues of life.

More information at (617) 661-1515 or info@harvard.com 

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Tuesday, May 3
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Boston TechBreakfast: Paperflite, thoughtbot, MobileLeads LLC, and More!
Tuesday, May 3
8:00 AM
Northeastern University, Curry Student Center, Room 318-322, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston

Interact with your peers in a monthly morning breakfast meetup. At this monthly breakfast get-together techies, developers, designers, and entrepreneurs share learn from their peers through show and tell / show-case style presentations.
And yes, this is free! Thank our sponsors when you see them :)

Agenda for Boston TechBreakfast:
8:00 - 8:15 - Get yer Bagels & Coffee and chit-chat 
8:15 - 8:20 - Introductions, Sponsors, Announcements 
8:20 - ~9:30 - Showcases and Shout-Outs! 
Paperflite: - Yegappan Kumarappan
thoughtbot: FormKeep - Matthew Sumner
MobileLeads LLC: MLeads - Manish Gorawala
*** OPEN ***
~9:30 - end - Final "Shout Outs" & Last Words

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Black 2.0: the New Liberation Movement
Tuesday, May 3
12:00 pm
Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, 23 Everett Street, Second Floor, Cambridge
Event will be live webcast at https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/05/Williams at 12:00 pm.

with Carl Williams, staff attorney at the ACLU of MA 
Carl Williams will join us to speak about the current Black Liberation movement. What and who it is, how it started, and how Twitter, Facebook (yes, Facebook) and other social media played a part.

About Carl
Carl joined the ACLU of Massachusetts as staff attorney in September 2013. He was previously a criminal defense attorney with the Roxbury Defenders Unit of the Committee for Public Counsel Services. Carl is a graduate of the University of Rhode Island and the University of Wisconsin Law School.

A long-time resident of Boston’s Roxbury neighborhood, he has been an activist and organizer on issues of war, immigrants’ rights, LGBTQ rights, racial justice and Palestinian self-determination. Carl is a member of the National Lawyers Guild and has served on its Massachusetts board of directors. During the Occupy Boston movement he was part of its legal defense and support team, which provided nearly 24-hour support to the participants.

More recently, Carl was a Givelber Distinguished Lecturer on Public Interest Law at Northeastern University School of Law, where he taught a class on social justice movements and the law.

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How "New" is the New National Front?:  Mapping Out Marine Le Pen's Rhetorical Turn With Digital Humanities Software 
Tuesday, May 3
4:00p–5:30p
MIT, Building 14E-304, 160 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Cecile Alduy
Since taking over the National Front in 2011, Marine Le Pen has carried the far right party to first place in the polls. What does she say that resonates with French voters so strongly? Does voting Marine Le Pen today mean the same thing as voting Jean-Marie Le Pen yesterday? 

Cecile Alduy is Associate Professor of French literature and culture and the Director of the French and Italian Department at Stanford University. Last year she published Marine Le Pen prise aux mots. D’cryptage du nouveau discours frontiste [Marine Le Pen Taken To Her Words. Decoding the New National Front Discourse] (Seuil, 2015).

Global France Seminar

Open to: the general public
Cost: 0 
Sponsor(s): MIT Global Studies and Languages
For more information, contact:  Lisa Hickler
617-452-2676

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Common Ground for Health: Precision, Personalized, and Social Medicine
WHEN  Tue., May 3, 2016, 5 p.m.
WHERE  Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Fay House, Sheerr Room, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Health Sciences, Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
SPEAKER(S)  Professors Linn Getz, of the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, and Bruce McEwen, of the Rockefeller University
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS  “Precision medicine” and “personalized medicine” are emerging medical models that promise to customize disease prevention and treatments based on individual variability in DNA and the molecular products of genes. “Social medicine” seeks to understand how social and economic conditions impact health and disease. With recent developments in epigenetics, this lecture will examine how these different paths contribute to health study and how the most fruitful work may occur at the intersection of these perspectives.

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Askwith Forum - Teens and Sex: Navigating from Shame and Regret to Integrity and Wellness
WHEN  Tue., May 3, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT Discussion, Forum, Lecture, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Alumni, AskWith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT PHONE  617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED  No
ADMISSION FEE This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Education
DETAILS
Speaker:  Peggy Orenstein, Author, Girls and Sex: Navigating the Complicated New Landscape and Cinderella Ate My Daughter
Moderator: Deborah Jewell-Sherman, Ed.M.’92, Ed.D.’95, Professor of Practice, HGSE
Discussants:
Justine Fonte, Director of Health & Wellness, The Dalton School, New York, NY
Richard Weissbourd, Ed.D.’87, Senior Lecturer on Education; Faculty Director, Human Development and Psychology Program; Co-Director, Making Caring Common, HGSE
In this forum Peggy Orenstein will discuss her New York Times best-selling book, Girls and Sex. Orenstein, a renowned journalist and the author of several books, including Cinderella Ate My Daughter, examines the ways in which porn and all its sexual myths have seeped into young people’s lives; why we need to redefine “virginity”; what we can learn from queer girls; the complicated terrain of hookup culture; and the unfortunate realities surrounding assault. Weissbourd and Fonte will engage with Orenstein in a discussion on how educators and parents can far more effectively guide both teen girls and boys in navigating this complex terrain. Audience Q&A will follow the panel discussion.
In conjunction with Making Caring Common and the HGSE Task Force on Sexual Assault and Harassment.

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TED Talks:  The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking
Tuesday, May 3
6:00 PM (Doors at 5:30)
Brattle Theatre, 40 Brattle Street, Cambridge
Cost:  $5.00 - On Sale Now

Harvard Book Store welcomes the curator of the internationally famous TED Talks CHRIS ANDERSON for a discussion of his book TED Talks: The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking—an insider’s guide to creating talks that are unforgettable.
About TED Talks

Since taking over TED in the early 2000s, Chris Anderson has shown how carefully crafted short talks can be the key to unlocking empathy, stirring excitement, spreading knowledge, and promoting a shared dream. Done right, a talk can electrify a room and transform an audience’s worldview. Done right, a talk is more powerful than anything in written form.

This book explains how the miracle of powerful public speaking is achieved, and equips you to give it your best shot. There is no set formula; no two talks should be the same. The goal is for you to give the talk that only you can give. But don’t be intimidated. You may find it more natural than you think.
Chris Anderson has worked behind the scenes with all the TED speakers who have inspired us the most, and here he shares insights from such favorites as Sir Ken Robinson, Amy Cuddy, Bill Gates, Elizabeth Gilbert, Salman Khan, Dan Gilbert, Mary Roach, Matt Ridley, and dozens more—everything from how to craft your talk’s content to how you can be most effective on stage. This is the 21st-century’s new manual for truly effective communication and it is a must-read for anyone who is ready to create impact with their ideas.

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e4Dev Weekly Speaker Series: The Next Step of Program Evaluations: Conducting Impact Assessments in Development Projects 
Tuesday, May
6pm-7pm
MIT, Building E19-319, 400 Main Street, Cambridge

Dr. Tavneet Suri, Associate Professor of Applied Economics, MIT Sloan School of Management

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The Momentum towards Sustainability and Challenges Facing Youth
Tuesday, May 3
6:00 PM to 8:30 PM (EDT)
Cambridge Innovation Center, Venture Cafe, 5th Floor One Broadway, Cambridge
Cost:  $10 – $12

Not unlike generations before them, kids these days are growing up in a new reality. Lightening-speed connectivity and innovation are making life exciting and them aware of massive societal issues. Included in this mix is a large group of disadvantaged young people who have less to do with the natural world than ever before.
This month, our spotlight is on momentum toward ever-greater sustainability and the challenges kids face in a connected, yet changing and also distressed world. There will be a lot to learn from the truths and tensions of this topic and to take back to your own efforts in your communities, organizations and personal lives.
As a starting point for the evening, we’ve asked our speakers to touch on a few topics as they bring their experience and passion for sustainability and children to the BASG.
Authentic, meaningful and effective approaches for engaging children in sustainability
The role of policy at the federal or state level to advance sustainability education
Translating interest in sustainability to interest in a STEM career
Differences in momentum across regions, demographics and living environments
We are grateful to Eric Magers (Director of the Green Team and Green Scholars Programs in the Manchester-Essex Regional School District) and Dr. Ricky S. Stern, Founder and Executive Director of “e” inc., an environment science learning and action center, for leading this important conversation.

Dr. Ricky Stern
Ricky founded “e” inc. over 13 years ago with a mission of educating children, youth and their caregivers in our area about environment science, environmentally positive behavior, and how they can make a difference that can lead to a sustainable future. She and her team teach young people through standards-based science residencies that use hands-on experiences to demonstrate science ideas and actions. Their goal is to help children clearly grasp the science concepts of how our planet ‘works’ and what they can do today to make a difference. “e” inc. is active in 13 schools and 17 after-schools in 3 cities, this year reaching 7000 young people.
Eric Magers
Eric is a passionate sustainability educator and practitioner. Everything he does is about helping students in their quest of lifelong learning and collaborating with others to grow and improve local and national environmental education. Two cool highlights from Eric’s environmental advocacy career are receiving an honorable mention in 2014 from the EPA’s Gina McCarthy for the Presidential Innovation Award for Environmental Educators and winning the Alliance for Climate Education Teacher of the Year award in 2013, annually given to one teacher in the U.S.

We hope you’ll be able to join us, our speakers and our co-host CitySprouts for this important conversation. — Carol, Holly, Tilly.

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Spring Demo Night!
Tuesday, May 3
7:00 PM to 9:30 PM
Microsoft NERD, Clara Barton Room, 1st Floor, 1 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

At Code for Boston Demo Nights, Brigade teams have the opportunity to show off the civic technology projects they're working on, celebrate successful work, and discuss blockers they're working through. For this Demo Night, we'll be joined by partners from government, non-profit groups, community groups, companies, and other institutions to show off the great civic innovation and technology work they're doing here in Boston.

We welcome members of the public to come in and see what we're up to, as well as members of the technology and government communities.

We hope to see you there!

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Wednesday, May 4
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Harvard SEAS [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences] Design & Project Fair
Student Events
Wednesday, May 4, 2016 (All day)
Harvard, Science Center Plaza Tent, 1 Oxford Street, Cambridge

We invite you to attend the annual showcase of SEAS undergraduate and graduate student demonstrations, presentations, and prototypes. See how our students at SEAS are applying their knowledge to solve real-world problems.

Meet us under the big white tent in the Science Center Plaza, and see what's new at SEAS this year!

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Webinar:  Community Food Rescue: A Model to Feed More and Waste Less
Wednesday May 4
10:30 AM - 11:30 AM EST

Presenter
Cheryl Kollin, Principal, Full Plate Ventures and Program Director, Community Food Rescue

Overview
In Montgomery County, 78,000 people are food insecure while 246,000 tons of food is wasted each year. This coffee talk will introduce you to how Community Food Rescue, a program of Manna Food Center, is tackling the twin problems of food waste and food insecurity in Montgomery County, MD. Cheryl Kollin, Program Director will share our process and best practices for building a countywide, coordinated network for collective impact.

Presenter Bio
Cheryl Kollin, MBA is principal of Full Plate Ventures, a business consulting firm specializing in local food systems and social enterprise. Cheryl serves as Program Director of Community Food Rescue.

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Finding common standards for the Right to be Forgotten: Challenges and Perspective
Wednesday, May 4
12:00 pm
Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, 23 Everett Street, Second Floor, Cambridge
Event will be live webcast at https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/05/Reymond at 12:00 pm.

with Dr. Michel Reymond 
Following the 2014 Google Spain decision rendered by the European Court of Justice of the European Union, search engines – and, first among them, Google – are tasked with the delisting of search results leading to outdated or inaccurate information about European citizens. This ‘right to be delisted’ has since then revealed itself as a highly controversial concept, raising issues such as the desired degree of protection of personal data over the Internet and the role of the act of forgetting in the digital age; it also highlighted the lack of an existing consensus over these questions between individual jurisdictions – and namely between the European Union and the United States.

On 14 April 2016, the European Parliament has adopted the General Data Protection Regulation, which will, in two years from now, update and harmonize data protection law all across the Member States of the European Union. Its article 17 contains a ‘right to erasure’ or a ‘right to be forgotten’ which is set to formalize, unify and extend the existing Google Spain ruling.

But how to make that happen in practice? How can legal fragmentation be prevented? Relying on his background in conflict of laws, the speaker will show that finding common standards for the Right to be Forgotten will prove extremely difficult – not only regarding its procedural elements, but also when addressing its substance. He will also argue that, before even starting a conversation between the U.S. and the E.U., some soul-searching about the nature of the right may need to be performed inside the E.U. itself first.

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Ghost Cities: the Role of Citizens and the Government
Wednesday, May 4
12:30p–2:00p
MIT, Building 9-450, 105 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Professor WOODWORTH Max
Max Woodworth is an Assistant Professor of Geography at the Ohio State University. He completed his PhD at the University of California, Berkeley on "Frontier Boomtown Urbanism," focusing on city building in Ordos, Inner Mongolia, China. His is currently researching China's lower-tier cities in the country's Inner Asian northern and western borderlands.

China Talk Series 
In collaboration with the China Planning, Real Estate, and Architecture (China PRA) student organization, DUSP, CRE, and the STL Lab are organizing 2016 spring semester China Talk Series.  

The China Talk Series will bring a selection of experts on China's urbanization to SA+P to present their research on planning, real estate, and architecture. This semester, the theme of the Talk Series is socially responsible real estate entrepreneurship in China. We look forward to lively lunch discussions on opportunities and challenges facing China as it urbanizes.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Department of Urban Studies and Planning
For more information, contact:  Heather Mooney
617-715-2352

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Research at Microsoft: Beyond the Horizon
Wednesday, May 4
4:00 PM to 6:00 PM (EDT) 
MIT, Building 32,Ray and Maria Stata Center, Star Conference Room D-463, Cambridge

Join Jeannette Wing, Corporate Vice President at Microsoft Research, at CSAIL on May 4, 2016, from 4:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m. in Stata. Refreshments will be served.
Abstract:  The field of computing continues to advance at an astounding pace thanks to rapid innovation and collaboration between academia and industrial research institutions such as Microsoft Research. Microsoft Research is a unique industrial research lab supporting open, basic research with a mission to advance state of the art while doing rapid technology transfer to industry.  Through illustrative examples, I will talk about how Microsoft Research’s partnerships with academia impact science, technology, and society.

Bio:  Jeannette M. Wing is Corporate Vice President, Microsoft Research. She is Adjunct Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon where she twice served as the Head of the Computer Science Department.  She is also Affiliate Faculty in Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington.  From 2007-2010 she was the Assistant Director of the Computer and Information Science and Engineering Directorate at the National Science Foundation.  She received her S.B. and S.M.  degrees in Computer Science and Engineering in 1979 and her Ph.D. degree in Computer Science in 1983, all from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Professor Wing's general research interests are in the areas of trustworthy computing, specification and verification, concurrent and distributed systems, programming languages, and software engineering. Her current interests are in the foundations of security and privacy. She was or is on the editorial board of twelve journals, including the Journal of the ACM and Communications of the ACM.

She is currently Chair of the DARPA Information Science and Technology (ISAT) Board and Chair-Elect of the AAAS Section on Information, Computing and Communications. She has been a member of many industry, government, and professional society boards, including: Networking and Information Technology (NITRD) Technical Advisory Group to the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), National Academies of Sciences' Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, ACM Council, Computing Research Association Board, DARPA ISAT, NSF's CISE Advisory Committee, Microsoft Trustworthy Computing Academic Advisory Board, General Electric Academic Software Advisory Panel, Intel Research Pittsburgh's Advisory Board, Dartmouth's Institute for Security Technology Studies Advisory Committee, and Idaho National Laboratory and Homeland Security Strategic Advisory Committee.  She served on the ACM Infosys Award Committee, the ACM Kanellakis Award Committee, the ACM Karlstrom Outstanding Educator Award Committee, and the Sloan Research Fellowships Program Committee.  She was the co-chair of the Technical Symposium of Formal Methods'99, co-organizer of the UW-MSR-CMU 2003 Software Security Summer Institute, and co-chair of the First International Symposium on Secure Software Engineering.  She served as co-chair of NITRD from 2007-2010.
She was on the faculty at the University of Southern California, and has worked at Bell Laboratories, USC/Information Sciences Institute, and Xerox Palo Alto Research Laboratories.  She spent sabbaticals at MIT in 1992 and at Microsoft Research 2002-2003.  She has consulted for Digital Equipment Corporation, the Mellon Institute (Carnegie Mellon Research Institute), System Development Corporation, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Professor Wing received the CRA Distinguished Service Award in 2011 and the ACM Distinguished Service Award in 2014.  She is a member of She is a member of Sigma Xi, Phi Beta Kappa, Tau Beta Pi, and Eta Kappa Nu.  She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE).

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Tag Gas Leaks in Cambridge
Wednesday, May 4
between 4-7pm

Join one of our 25 "tag teams" and hit the streets with signs, door hangers and yellow flags. We're marking Cambridge's 231 leaks. Can you help? RSVP to Kristine Jelstrup (kejelstrup@gmail.com) and we'll connect you to a team.  Kids encouraged to come along too!  

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The Politics of the Latino Vote: Immigration and the Run Up to 2016
WHEN  Wed., May 4, 2016, 4:10 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, 124 Mount Auburn Street, Suite 200-North, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Humanities, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR The Ash Center for Democratic Governance & Innovation
SPEAKER(S)  Tom Jawetz, Vice President of Immigration Policy, Center for American Progress; Josiane Martinez, Founder, Archipelago Strategies Group; Sophia Jordán Wallace, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Rutgers University; and HKS Assistant Professor of Public Policy Leah Wright Rigueur
COST  Free and open to the public
CONTACT INFO Maisie O'Brien
DETAILS  Following the defeat of Mitt Romney's presidential campaign in 2012, the Republican National Committee commissioned an "autopsy" report, which explicitly called for the party to champion comprehensive immigration reform. Though a bipartisan immigration bill passed in the Senate, it was never considered by the House of Representatives, and hopes for the passage of sweeping immigration reform legislation ultimately collapsed.
Leading 2016 GOP presidential contenders have largely taken a hard line on immigration, counter to the RNC's autopsy report recommendations. Panelists will explore why the GOP has eschewed comprehensive immigration reform in light of the RNC autopsy report, discuss immigration's role in the 2016 presidential race, and assess possible Latino voter response to the campaign's immigration rhetoric.

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Opportunities in Industrial Water treatment - by Prakash Govindan, CTO, Gradiant
Wednesday, May 4
4:30-5:30pm
MIT, Building 3-333, 33 Massachusetts Avenue (Rear), Cambridge

Prakash is an alumnus of MIT, and the founder and CTO at Gradiant Corporation, a technology-driven water company aimed at solving the world’s most challenging water treatment problems. The company’s flagship technology - Carrier Gas Extraction (CGETM) - was field demonstrated in the Permian basin in 2013 and has since won the 'Industrial Water Project of the Year' at the Global Water Awards 2014. He will talk about his work in the company which currently has two full-scale operating plants for US oil field clients.


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Deans' Challenge Demo Day
WHEN  Wed., May 4, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Innovation Labs, 125 Western Avenue, Boston
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Special Events
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Harvard I-Lab
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS  We are pleased to invite you to this year’s Deans’ Challenges Demo Day. Ten finalist teams from two Deans’ Challenges will showcase their exciting ventures to the Harvard/Cambridge/Boston community. The sponsoring deans of each Challenge will announce the winners and runners-up and present more than $100,000 in prize money.
The Deans’ Challenges Demo Day will highlight: Deans’ Health and Life Sciences Challenge and Deans’ Cultural Entrepreneurship Challenge.
We hope you are able to join us for this celebratory evening!

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New England Water Innovation Network Water Pitch Night
Wednesday, May 4
5:30 PM to 7:30 PM (EDT)
Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, 63 Franklin Street, 3rd Floor, Boston

Please join the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC), the New England Water Innovation Network (NEWIN) and the local water industry startup community for an evening of water technology pitches and networking on Wednesday, May 4, 2016. Entrepreneurs, academics, technologists and investors are all welcome to join #WaterPitchNight to get a glimpse of local innovation and connect with other water professionals. 

Pitching Companies Include:
Alina Rwei from AquaFresco
Diana Yousef-Martinek from Change-Water
Xiao Su from Redox Water Solutions

Agenda:
5:30 - 6:00pm | Networking and light refreshments
6:00 - 6:15pm | Opening remarks from NEWIN and MassCEC
6:15 - 6:30pm | Keynote - Bruce Bishop, Managing Director for Veolia Water Technologies
6:30 - 7:00pm | Three water tech startups pitch their water technology
7:00 - 7:30pm | Closing remarks and networking

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Black Lives Matter
Wednesday, May 4
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
Workbar Cambridge, 45 Prospect Street, Cambridge

The Black Lives Matter Movement campaigns against violence towards black people in the United States. It started in 2012, after the acquittal of George Zimmerman in the shooting death of black teen Trayvon Martin. Since then, a national organization was formed to "(re)build the Black liberation movement".  Protests are regularly organized in its name in response to deaths of black people by law enforcement officers, as well as broader issues of racial profiling, police brutality, and racial inequality. There has been much backlash from the movement, including people coining the phrase "All Lives Matter" and "Blue Lives Matter"; regardless, the movement undeniably opened up a national conversation about tense race relations.

Why did the Black Lives Matter Movement start now?  
How has the movement changed racial tension in the United States?  Are race relations improving? ...or getting worse?

Join us for a brief presentation from our speaker about the history of social movements in the United States, followed by extensive Q&A and discussion.

**Stay for snacks after the event to talk further about the topic with attendees & the speaker!**
Thank you to Doubleday Law, the sponsor of our post-event mixer & discussion!
Speaker: 
Dr. Ravi Perry is an activist scholar with specializations in Black politics, minority representation, LGBT politics, civil rights, social movements, and urban politics. He concentrates his research, oratory, and social and educational activism in areas such as the new generation of civil rights debates, public policy, and public service delivery to persons of color.

Dr. Perry is currently an Associate Professor of Political Science at Virginia Commonwealth University. His activism, commentary and oratory has been featured in media outlets such as CNN, Huffington Post, Politics Daily, the National Journal, MSNBC, National Public Radio, and the Washington Post.

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Danny Hillis speaking on The Long Now and the 10-000-year Clock
Wednesday, May 4
7:00 PM
The Venture Cafe at the Cambridge Innovation Center, One Broadway, 5th Floor, Kendall Square, Cambridge

Cost:  $15.00 /per person

Danny Hillis will be speaking on The Long Now Foundation and details of the Clock project, "a monument scale, multi-millennial, all mechanical clock created as an icon to long term thinking." See this page on the Long Now site for further information on the Clock Project: http://longnow.org/clock/

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Planting in a Post-Wild World, a talk by Claudia West, co-author of "Planting in a Post-Wild World"
Wednesday, May 4
7:00pm to 8:30pm
Cambridge Public Library, 449 Broadway, Cambridge

A free lecture by Claudia West presented by Grow Native Mas
Few wild places remain in today’s world, making it ever more important to bring ecological principles back into the design of our managed landscapes. Much more than simply using native plants, this work necessitates understanding plant communities and embracing a new form of design that marries horticulture with ecology. Join us as we translate the ecological principles of wild plant communities into design and management tools to inform our native plantings. Using the work of several European ecologists and planting designers, we explore the science behind stable and lasting plant combinations—to help you create the landscapes you envision.

Claudia West is the co-author with Thomas Rainer of Planting in a Post-Wild World, and the Ecological Sales Manager at North Creek Nurseries. She works closely with ecological design and restoration professionals throughout the northeast, focused on stable, layered planting designs and the extensive use of native plants.

Free and open to the public

Phone Number:  781-790-8921

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Thursday, May 5
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MechE Innovation Day: "Design Revolution"
Thursday, May 5
12:00p–10:00p
MIT, Building W34, Ice Arena, 120 Vassar Street, Cambridge

The day begins at 12pm with the de Florez Award Competition, a 2-hour showcase of undergraduate and graduate student design and science projects. $20,000 in prizes will be awarded to MIT MechE students demonstrating outstanding ingenuity and creative judgment in mechanical engineering knowledge or practice. 

We continue our celebration at 6:15pm with a performance by MIT’s a cappella group The Chorallaries, followed by the annual 2.007 Final Robot Competition, "Design Revolution," starting at 6:30pm. This year, students will send their robots back to Revolutionary times to throw tea bags into Boston Harbor, place lanterns in the North Church, take a midnight ride to warn of British soldiers, and hide cannonballs in Concord. "No innovation without fabrication!" 

Robot Competition spectators will also enjoy perusing the adjacent Engineering Petting Zoo, featuring GM’s Chevy Volt, Shell’s NASCAR No. 22 racecar, Exxon Mobil race car engines, MIT’s Formula SAE race car, MechE student research projects, and more!

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free 
Sponsor(s): Mechanical Engineering Dept.
For more information, contact:  Alissa Mallinson
617-258-7511

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Modeling Contributions to CO2 Measured at a Site in Northern China (2005-2009)
Thursday, May 5
3:30PM TO 4:45PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Archana Dayalu, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences

China Project Seminar

Contact Name:  Chris Nielsen


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Tag Gas Leaks in Cambridge
Thursday, May 5
between 4-7pm

Join one of our 25 "tag teams" and hit the streets with signs, door hangers and yellow flags. We're marking Cambridge's 231 leaks. Can you help? RSVP to Kristine Jelstrup (kejelstrup@gmail.com) and we'll connect you to a team.  Kids encouraged to come along too!  

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An Economist's Take on Climate Change: The Paris Agreement and the Post-2020 World
Thursday, May 5
4:45p–5:45p
MIT, Building 1-190, 33 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Speaker: Robert Stavins
In this talk, Stavins will provide an economic perspective as he assesses the Paris Agreement, reached in December of 2015. He will review the previous 20 years of climate negotiations in order to place the Paris Agreement in its proper context. Drawing on research carried out by the Harvard Project on Climate Agreements, he will provide a detailed assessment of the new approach now being taken, looking both at the significant accomplishments of the Agreement, as well as the key challenges that remain. Particular attention will be given to the potential role of carbon pricing at the regional (EU), national, and sub-national levels, and the importance of international linkage among heterogeneous policies. Stavins will conclude with an examination of the institutional path ahead, both within the United Nations and outside of it.

IHS Seminar Series

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): MIT Energy Initiative
For more information, contact:
Rebecca Marshall-Howarth

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Creative Industries Innovation
Thursday, May 5
5:00 PM to 7:30 PM (EDT)
Venture Café (Havana), 5th Floor, CIC, One Broadway, Cambridge

Come for the Creative Industries innovation panel and Q & A will feature a panel from the Greater Boston – area, New York, and Rhode Island ecosystem of creative industry and economy. Panelist will discuss how their training in the arts has influenced their approach to innovation and how they bring a unique twist to the organization they work with as well as highlight the challenges they have faced as creative innovators, success stories, and what unique opportunities they see in the future.

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Virtual Reality Meets Documentary: A Deeper Look
Thursday, May 5
5:00p–7:00p
MIT, Buidling 54-100, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

When Time Magazine graced its cover with Oculus Rift inventor Palmer Luckey's awkward pose, it effectively proclaimed that VR was "the next big thing" that didn't have any place in our lives yet. Google, Facebook, The New York Times, PBS Frontline, Sundance Film Institute and many others are investing heavily in virtual reality as a powerful new storytelling medium. It's capturing the imagination of documentary storytellers all over the world yet for all its enthusiasts, virtual reality has its skeptics. For all virtual reality is talked about, it can be deeply misunderstood. 

The goal of this panel is to talk with some of the leading creators in the VR space and better understand VR's potentials and implications for documentary and journalism. 

Speakers 
Raney Aronson-Rath runs FRONTLINE, PBS's flagship investigative journalism series, and is a leading voice on the future of journalism. Katy Morrison is co-Founder and producer at Virtual Reality studio VRTOV. Nonny de la Pena was selected by Wired Magazine as a #MakeTechHuman Agent of Change and has been called "The Godmother of Virtual Reality". Caspar Sonnen is a festival organizer, including New Media Coordinator of the International Documentary Film Festival Amsterdam, and curator specialised in independent cinema and digital media art.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Comparative Media Studies/Writing
For more information, contact:  Andrew Whitacre
617-324-0490

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Askwith Forum - Engineering Personalized Learning: The Story of Summit Schools and Facebook
WHEN  Thu., May 5, 2016, 5:30 – 7 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Longfellow Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
TYPE OF EVENT Discussion, Forum, Lecture, Question & Answer Session
PROGRAM/DEPARTMENT  Alumni, AskWith Forum
BUILDING/ROOM  Askwith Hall
CONTACT NAME  Roger Falcon
CONTACT PHONE  617-384-9968
SPONSORING ORGANIZATION/DEPARTMENT Harvard Graduate School of Education
REGISTRATION REQUIRED  No
ADMISSION FEE This event is free and open to the public.
RSVP REQUIRED No
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Education
DETAILS
Speakers: 
Mike Sego, Director of Engineering, Facebook 
Diane Tavenner, Founder and CEO, Summit Public Schools 
Moderator: Chris Dede, Timothy E. Wirth Professor in Learning Technologies, Technology, Innovation, and Education Program, HGSE
In the past few years, personalized learning has gone from concept to reality in the classroom. Schools across the country are customizing instruction to meet the needs, skills, and passions of their students — and teachers are leading the way. In this Askwith Forum, Tavenner and Sego will discuss how Summit teachers partnered with Facebook engineers to develop an online personalized learning platform and make it available to any school for free. Join us to hear how personalized learning is shifting teacher practice and encouraging students to take greater ownership of their learning, while building their leadership, collaboration, and problem-solving skills. Tavenner and Sego will also share the experiences of 29 schools, 4,800 students, and 270 teachers who are part of Summit and its Basecamp partnership program.

Networking reception with members of the Facebook product  and engineering and Summit teams immediately following the forum.

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EnergyBar!
Thursday, May 5
5:30 PM to 8:30 PM
Greentown Labs, 28 Dane Street, Somerville

EnergyBar is Greentown Labs' monthly networking event devoted to helping people in clean technology meet and discuss innovations in energy technology. Entrepreneurs, investors, students, and ‘friends of cleantech,’ are invited to attend, meet colleagues, and expand our growing regional clean technology community. 

Our attendees typically span a variety of disciplines within energy, efficiency, and renewables. In general, if you're looking for a job in cleantech or energy, trying to expand your network, or perhaps thinking about starting your own energy-related company this is the event for you. Expect to have conversations about issues facing advanced and renewable energy technologies and ways to solve our most pressing energy problems. 

Light appetizers and drinks will be served starting at 5:30 pm. Suggested dress is shop floor casual. Parking is incredibly limited at Greentown Labs and we encourage attendees to consider taking advantage of public transportation. 

Hope to see you there! 

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Natural and Induced Earthquakes: The Hidden Threat to Large Cities in the United States
Thursday, May 5
6:00PM
Harvard, Geo Lecture Hall (100), 24 Oxford Street, Cambridge

A number of large U.S. metropolitan areas face the threat of earthquakes. Seattle, Portland, Los Angeles, and San Francisco—all located near major active faults—are statistically likely to experience major earthquakes in the near future. Seismologists and engineers in these cities are already preparing for “the big ones” (earthquakes with magnitudes greater than 8.0). Now, metropolitan areas such as Dallas and Oklahoma City, although far from plate boundaries, are experiencing moderate, but frequent earthquakes induced by injecting oil and gas wastewater into the ground. Marine Denolle will discuss how scientists are applying new tools to predict and model earthquakes, so that cities can prepare more effective responses to these geological forces.

Free and open to the public

Contact Name:  hmnh@hmsc.harvard.edu
(617) 495-3045


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RPP Colloquium: The Evolving Field of Religious Peacebuilding: Tanenbaum's Peacemakers in Action, Volume II
WHEN  Thu., May 5, 2016, 6 – 8:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Sperry Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Religion
SPONSOR Religions and the Practice of Peace Initiative; the Religious Literacy Project; and the El-Hibri Foundation
CONTACT Liz Lee-Hood
DETAILS  Religions and the Practice of Peace Colloquium Dinner Series
Joyce S. Dubensky, Esq., CEO, Tanenbaum.
Hind Kabawat, director of Interfaith Peacebuilding, George Mason University’s Center for World Religions Diplomacy & Conflict Resolution, and Tanenbaum Peacemaker in Action.
Tanenbaum CEO Joyce Dubensky and Tanenbaum’s Syrian Peacemaker Hind Kabawat will discuss Tanenbaum’s groundbreaking new book Peacemakers in Action: Profiles in Religious Peacebuilding Volume II. As a religiously-motivated peacemaker working in Syria and surrounding areas, Kabawat will share insights on the challenges and opportunities in religious peacebuilding. Dubensky will then explore the evolving field of religious peacebuilding and the individuals who make it their profession—including Tanenbaum Peacemakers, who so often work in violent conflicts and now collaborate through their Peacemakers Network for in-country interventions.
The event will be moderated by HDS Senior Lecturer on Religious Studies and Education Diane L. Moore, director of the Religious Literacy Project.
Co-sponsored by the Religious Literacy Project at Harvard Divinity School. With generous support from the El-Hibri Foundation.
Recommended Readings
Short List 
Tanenbaum, "Introduction." In Peacemakers in Action: Profiles in Religion and Conflict Resolution. Edited by David Little. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007, 3-21. 
Hind Kabawat, The Syrian Revolution is Not a Holy War, article, Foreign Policy Magazine, online, March 9, 2016. 
Hind Kabawat, Lingering Questions Surround Geneva III, article, The Huffington Post, online, Feb 12, 2016. 
Hind Kabawat, Riyadh Conference: What Makes It Different?, article, The Huffington Post, online, December 16, 2015. 
Further Reading
Tanenbaum, "Underground Woman: Sakena Yacoobi and the Afghan Institute of Learning, Afghanistan." In Peacemakers in Action: Profiles in Religion and Conflict Resolution. Edited by David Little. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007, 382-401. 
David Little, "Religion, Violent Conflict, and Peacemaking." In Peacemakers in Action: Profiles in Religion and Conflict Resolution. Edited by David Little. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2007, 429-448. 
Tanenbaum's Combating Extremism resource that features Hind Kabawat: 
Testimony at U.S. House Committee Hearing on the Islamic State and Religious Minorities: a resource sheet about Hind Kabawat
Hind Kabawat’s Full Testimony at the U.S. House Committee Hearing on the Islamic State and Religious Minorities
About this series: Launched by HDS Dean David N. Hempton in 2014, this monthly public series convenes a cross-disciplinary RPP Working Group of faculty, experts, graduate students, and alumni from across Harvard’s Schools and the local area to explore topics and cases in religions and the practice of peace. A diverse array of scholars, leaders, and religious peacebuilders are invited to present and engage with the RPP Working Group and general audience. A light dinner is served and a brief reception follows the program.
Join RPP’s mailing list and visit the RPP Initiative at http://rpp.hds.harvard.edu

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Killer Drones: an evening of info and response
Thursday, May 5 
6:45pm 
Central Square Library, 45 Pearl Street, Cambridge

Whistle blower *Christopher Aaron* will speak about his experiences as an analyst for the drone assassination program in Iraq and Afghanistan from 2006 to 2009 and excerpts from the film "Drone" will be shown.  Aaron is a former counter-terrorism officer for the CIA and the DoD.  He resigned in 2009 due to ethical objections with the trajectories of the wars.  After the presentation, there will be plenty of time for questions as well as suggestions for what citizens can do to stop the drone  assassination program.

Sponsored by the Eastern Massachusetts Anti-Drones Network and the Boston Branch of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF).
For more information, call (617) 776-6524.

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Helping Boston Prepare for Sea Level Rise
Thursday, May 5
7:00pm-8:30pm
New England Aquarium, 1 Central Wharf, Boston

Bud Ris, former New England Aquarium President and CEO, is now a Senior Advisor on Climate Change for the Barr Foundation and co-chair of the City's Task Force on Climate Preparedness. He has been a longtime advocate and proponent of preparing for climate change with its threats to the natural world, the ocean, and cities worldwide, notably Boston. In his presentation, "Climate Ready Boston," Bud Ris will review newly updated projections for climate change anticipated over the next several decades and discuss a major project that the city has launched to begin planning for these changes.

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Friday, May 6
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Petrie-Flom Center's 2016 Annual Conference: Big Data, Health Law, and Bioethics
WHEN  Fri., May 6, 2016, 8 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE Harvard Law School, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East ABC, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Conferences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Petrie-Flom Center, Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University and the Health Ethics and Policy Lab, University of Zurich
COST  Free, but registration is required.
DETAILS
The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School is pleased to announce our 2016 annual conference, entitled: “Big Data, Health Law, and Bioethics.”
“Big Data” is a phrase that has been used pervasively by the media and the lay public in the last several years. While many definitions are possible, the common denominator seems to include the “three V’s” – Volume (vast amounts of data), Variety (significant heterogeneity in the type of data available in the set), and Velocity (speed at which a data scientist or user can access and analyze the data).
Health care has become one of the key emerging use cases for big data. For example, Fitbit and Apple’s ResearchKit can provide researchers access to vast stores of biometric data on users from which to test hypotheses on nutrition, fitness, disease progression, treatment success, and the like.
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) have vast stores of billing data that can be mined to promote high value care and prevent fraud; the same is true of private health insurers. And hospitals have attempted to reduce re-admission rates by targeting patients that predictive algorithms indicate are at highest risk based on analysis of available data collected from existing patient records.
Underlying these and many other potential uses, however, are legal and ethical challenges relating to, among other things, privacy, discrimination, intellectual property, tort, and informed consent, as well as research and clinical ethics.
This conference, and anticipated edited volume, will aim to: (1) identify the various ways in which law and ethics intersect with the use of big data in health care and health research, particularly in the United States; (2) understand the way U.S. law (and potentially other legal systems) currently promotes or stands as an obstacle to these potential uses; (3) determine what might be learned from the legal and ethical treatment of uses of big data in other sectors and countries; and (4) examine potential solutions (industry best practices, common law, legislative, executive, domestic and international) for better use of big data in health care and health research in the U.S.

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The State of Hydropower Projects Today: Lessons from the Past for the Course Ahead
Friday, May 6
10:00a–4:30p
MIT, Building 9-450, 105 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Hosted by the Displacement Research and Action Network the Workshop will bring together academics, international NGO and community group representatives as well as representatives of international institutions such as World Bank to discuss the State of Hydropower Projects Today. 

Recent years have seen an upsurge of focus on and investment in large dam building for hydropower generation. However, issues related to the economic, social, and environmental consequences arising from large dams remain largely on the periphery. One of the consequences of this marginalization is the controversial and stagnant state of the basic framework of hydropower development. In 2000, the World Commission on Dams (WCD) launched a new framework for dam construction with safeguards based on the 'rights-and-risk approach'. These safeguard policies have had little to mixed effects on the implementation of large dam projects. Thus, there is an urgent need to create a platform where issues concerning the economic, environmental and social aspects of large dam projects are brought to the surface and discussed.  

This workshop will bring together academics, NGOs, international organizations, experts and researchers to discuss a variety of issues including access to energy for all, benefit sharing, and mitigating social and environmental consequences of dam building.

Open to: the general public
Cost: None 
Tickets: Please RSVP 
Sponsor(s): Department of Urban Studies and Planning, Displacement Action and Research Network, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Abdul Latif Jameel World Water and Food and Security Lab, MISTI Brazil, Asia Foundation
For more information, contact:  Aurora Bassett

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CarbonTracker-Lagrange: A Framework for Greenhouse Gas Flux Estimation at Regional to Continental Scales
Friday, May 6
12:00PM TO 1:00PM
Harvard, 100F Pierce Hall, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge

with Arlyn Andrews, NOAA ESRL

Atmospheric Sciences Seminar

Contact Name:  Joshua Benmergui

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From the War on Poverty to the War on Crime:  The Making of Mass Incarceration in America
Friday, May 6
3:00 PM
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Elizabeth Hinton
In the United States today, one in every thirty-one adults is under some form of penal control, including one in eleven African American men. How did the “land of the free” become the home of the world’s largest prison system? Challenging the belief that America’s prison problem originated with the Reagan administration’s War on Drugs, Elizabeth Hinton traces the rise of mass incarceration to an ironic source: the social welfare programs of Lyndon Johnson’s Great Society at the height of the civil rights era.

Johnson’s War on Poverty policies sought to foster equality and economic opportunity. But these initiatives were also rooted in widely shared assumptions about African Americans’ role in urban disorder, which prompted Johnson to call for a simultaneous War on Crime. The 1965 Law Enforcement Assistance Act empowered the national government to take a direct role in militarizing local police. Federal anticrime funding soon incentivized social service providers to ally with police departments, courts, and prisons. Under Richard Nixon and his successors, welfare programs fell by the wayside while investment in policing and punishment expanded. Anticipating future crime, policymakers urged states to build new prisons and introduced law enforcement measures into urban schools and public housing, turning neighborhoods into targets of police surveillance.

By the 1980s, crime control and incarceration dominated national responses to poverty and inequality. The initiatives of that decade were less a sharp departure than the full realization of the punitive transformation of urban policy implemented by Republicans and Democrats alike since the 1960s.

More Information at (617) 661-1515 or info@harvard.com 

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D-Lab Spring Student Showcase & Open House
Friday, May 6
4:00p–6:00p
MIT, Building N51-310, 265 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Spring D-Lab students from D-Lab: Design, D-Lab: Energy, D-Lab: WASH, D-Lab: Water and Climate Change, D-Lab: Education and Learning, Innovation in Relief, Recovery, and Rebuilding, and D-Lab: Earth will present their team projects. Presentation followed by a poster and prototype session. Snacks!

Web site: d-lab.mit.edu
Open to: the general public
Cost: Free 
Sponsor(s): D-Lab
For more information, contact:  Nancy Adams
617 324-6197

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Saturday, May 7
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International Drone Day
Saturday, May 7
11 - 6p.    
Innovations and Design Building, 23 Drydock Avenue, Boston
Cost:  $5

What Is It?
Drones have a bad reputation, and even though many of us call our Multi-rotors by different names, the public does associate our fantastic machines with the word drone. We are here to make sure that Drones are seen in a positive light.

The purpose of International Drone Day is to show the world that drones are good, and can be used for many good purposes. Movie making, search and rescue, police work, architecture, inspections, emergency response, and for just having fun.


Tickets
Tickets start at just $5.00 (plus EventBrite fees) and are only available online before the event. Supporter ticket packages are also available. We will NOT be selling tickets at the door so be sure to get yours today!

Get Tickets Now!
Help Spread The Word
Help spread the word about the event. Share this page with your friends, Tweet about it using #dronedayboston, and download the event flyer to post at your favorite hobby shop.

Join Our Mailing List 
Enter your email and click Register 
Something For Everyone
FAA pilot registration stations
AMA membership program
Virtual flight simulator
Safe flight education sessions
Micro drones
FPV racing
Hardware show and tell
Hobby shops
Product demonstrations
Door prizes
And more!

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Wake Up the Earth Festival
Saturday, May 7
12pm - 6pm
Stonybrook T station, Jamaica Plain

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Success: the only choice
WHEN  Sat., May 7, 2016, 1 – 6 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard Graduate School Of Education, Askwith Auditorium, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Business, Classes/Workshops, Conferences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Harvard Extension Entrepreneurship and Real Estate Association (HEEREA.com)
SPEAKER(S)  Learn from engaging speakers and exchange your own ideas through discussion with students from across Harvard, distinguished faculty, Fortune 500 CEO's, self-made millionaires & from public service and private sectors.
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS  This will be a great opportunity to grow both entrepreneurship knowledge and your mindset as well as expand your professional networks.
Speakers will present in TED talks, panel discussions, and problem-solving scenarios. A pitch competition is also in the works!
Be sure to reserve your ticket before it's too late! We will cap attendance to facilitate group discussion.

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The Economics of Climate Change: 10 Years on from the Stern Review
Saturday, May 7
2:00p–3:15p
MIT, Building E52-164, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Nick Stern (London School of Economics)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Economics Special Events
For more information, contact:  economics calendar

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Building a Business Community Institution to Fight Corruption
Saturday, May 7
3:15p–4:30p
MIT, Building E52-164, 50 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Avinash Dixit (Princeton)

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Economics Special Events
For more information, contact:  economics calendar

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Monday, May 9
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2016 Mercury Solar Transit - LIVE
Monday, May 9
7:00a–3:00p

EAPS will be live broadcasting Mercury passing in front of the Mon on May 9, 2016. It's a relatively rare event and Wallace Observatory will be streaming it on YouTube from around 7AM until 3PM. Stay tuned for more details and be sure to check it out!

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)

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BU Conference on Sustainability Research
Monday, May 9
8:30 am to 5:00 pm
Boston University Photonics Building, 8 St. Mary’s Street, 9th floor, Boston

A one-day conference featuring presentations by Boston University faculty on their research related to sustainability issues around the globe in four sessions:
Measuring Sustainability
Human Dimensions of Sustainability
Modeling Sustainability
Future Sustainability


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MIT Atmospheric Science Seminar (MASS) - Isaac Held, Princeton
Monday, May 9
12:00p–1:00p
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus)

Speaker: Isaac Held (Princeton)
The MIT Atmospheric Science Seminar Series [MASS] is a student-run weekly seminar series. Topics include all research concerning the atmosphere and climate, but also talks about e.g. societal impacts of climatic processes. The seminars usually take place on Mondays in 54-915 from 12.00-1pm unless otherwise noted (term-time only). Talks are generally followed by a lunch with graduate students. Besides the seminar, individual meetings with professors, postdocs, and students are arranged. The seminar series is run by graduate students and is intended mainly for students to interact with individuals outside the department, but faculty and postdocs certainly participate. 2015/2016 co-ordinators: Marianna Linz (mlinz@mit.edu) and John Agard (jvagard@mit.edu). mass@mit.edu reaches the list. 

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences (EAPS)
For more information, contact:  Marianna Linz
617-253-2127

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Competing at Innovative Speed: Why Is It So Darn Hard?
Monday, May 9, 2016
12:00p–1:00p

Speaker: Steven J. Spear, DBA, Senior Lecturer, MIT Sloan School of Management and School of Engineering; Author: The High Velocity Edge
In this webinar, Dr. Steven J. Spear will define relentless innovation and how to use it to continually identify new targets and be the first to achieve them. He will discuss: 

1) why management decisions can no longer be made primarily by using sophisticated models to gather and analyze data; 
2) why companies today must also employ experiential and experimental approaches while constantly testing new ideas about what to do and how to do it; and 
3) how to achieve this new level of competitiveness at innovative speed and why that is easier said than done. 

Attendees will learn: 
1) ways to assess the willingness and ability of the organization to practice hyper-experimentation; 
2) how to encourage the continual generation of fresh ideas; 
3) why and how to discern if customers, suppliers, and vendors are competing at innovative speed; 
4) tips for practicing energy activation,including how to cultivate the freedom to discover and understand what is going right or wrong; and
5) how to identify recurring challenges, such as socio-psychological impediments, and address and mitigate them. 

A Q&A will follow the presentation. We invite you to join us!

MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series 
About the Series 

Sponsored by the System Design & Management (SDM) program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the MIT SDM Systems Thinking Webinar Series features research conducted by SDM faculty, alumni, students, and industry partners. The series is designed to disseminate information on how to employ systems thinking to address engineering, management, and socio-political components of complex challenges. Recordings and slides from prior SDM webinars can be accessed at sdm.mit.edu.

Open to: the general public
Cost: Free

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Making New Materials From Synthetically Modified Proteins
Monday, May 9
4:00pm to 5:00pm
MIT, Building 56-114, 21 Ames Street, Cambridge

Biological Chemistry Seminar Series: Matthew B. Francis, University of California at Berkeley

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Is Islamophobia accelerating global warming?
Monday, May 9
5:00p–6:30p
MIT, Building 2-105, 2 Memorial Drive, Cambridge

Speaker: Ghassan Hage
Ghassan Hage is the Future Generation Professor in the School of Philosophy, Anthropology and Social Inquiry, University of Melbourne 

This talk examines the relation between Islamophobia as the dominant form of racism today and the ecological crisis. It looks at the three common ways in which the two phenomena are seen to be linked: as an entanglement of two crises, metaphorically related with one being a source of imagery for the other and both originating in colonial forms of capitalist accumulation. The talk proposes a fourth way of linking the two: an argument that they are both emanating from a similar mode of being, or enmeshment, in the world, what is referred to as "generalised domestication."

Open to: the general public
Cost: 0 
Sponsor(s): MIT Global Studies and Languages
For more information, contact:  Lisa Hickler
617-452-2676

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Resilience, Climate, Race, and Relationships: One Journey. One Future. One...
Monday, May 9
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT) 
Legal Harborside, 270 Northern Avenue, Boston
Cost:  $16.29

Join Ceres, The Trust for Public Land, and The Nature Conservancy for a young professionals happy hour discussion about the resiliency challenges facing Boston and the opportunities we have to mitigate the impact of climate change in our city.
Dr. Atyia Martin, Chief Resilience Officer for the City of Boston, will discuss the City’s resilience strategy and the critical link between resilience, race, and relationships as we work to address local climate challenges and opportunities as “One Boston."
Ceres, The Trust for Public Land, and The Nature Conservancy will discuss what each organization is doing to help meet these challenges and to make Boston a climate-smarter city.

For more information please contact Taylor O'Leary, oleary@ceres.org 

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Tuesday, May 10
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Olin College of Engineering SCOPE SUMMIT 2016:  Featuring Rocket Talks & Poster Sessions
Tuesday, May 10
9:30am - 3:30pm
Olin Way, Needham

The Senior Capstone Program in Engineering (SCOPE) invites you to join us as teams of seniors present results from their year-long, corporate-sponsored projects.

WHO SHOULD COME?
Current sponsors, interested companies, educators, community members and all those interested in igniting engineering education!

Schedule of Events
9:30 - 10:00 am  Continental Breakfast and Registration, Milas Hall 
10:00 - 10:15 am  Welcome from Olin Leadership, Norden Auditorium, Milas Hall
10:15 - 11:15 am  Rocket Talks by SCOPE Teams 1-7, Norden Auditorium, Milas Hall
11:15 - 11:30 am  Break
11:30 - 12:30 pm  Rocket Talks by SCOPE Teams 8-14, Norden Auditorium,  Milas Hall
12:30 - 1:30 pm  Lunch (no charge for guests)
1:30 - 2:30 pm  Poster Session, tent in the Oval
2:30 - 3:30 pm  Reception, tent in the Oval

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Applying network science for public health: Toward 'social' communication strategies
Tuesday, May 10
12:00 pm
Harvard, Wasserstein Hall, Milstein East C, Room 2036, second floor, 1585 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge
Event will be live webcast at https://cyber.law.harvard.edu/events/luncheons/2016/05/Seymour at 12:00 pm.

with Berkman Fellow, Brittany Seymour 
The social nature of today’s Internet is creating new public health and policy challenges. For example, the US in 2014 experienced the largest measles outbreak in nearly a generation, which led to the passing of the nation's most conservative vaccine legislation, eliminating the personal belief exemption in California. Research has identified online misinformation about vaccines as one of the risk factors for this outbreak. Through three big data case analyses on water fluoridation, the Ebola epidemic, and childhood vaccinations, we analyze the influence of scientific evidence and the influence of “social proof,” a form of imitation where individuals ascribe to the behavior of others in order to resolve uncertainty. Our work aims to answer the question, how can we employ network science to develop social communication strategies for public health that build on the strengths and opportunities provided by today's Internet? In other words, instead of asking "How can we share our message with our target audience?" should we be asking "How can our target audience share our message?"

About Brittany
Dr. Brittany Seymour is an Assistant Professor at Harvard School of Dental Medicine. She holds a full-time appointment in the Department of Oral Health Policy and Epidemiology and the Office of Global and Community Health. She earned her Doctor of Dental Surgery degree from the University of Colorado School of Dental Medicine and completed her Masters in Public Health from Harvard School of Public Health with a concentration in Global Health and Population. Her overall research focus is in interdisciplinary approaches for oral health improvement at the global level through prevention, policy, and health promotion. She has held Fellowships at the Harvard Global Health Institute and the Harvard Berkman Center for Internet and Society, and conducts funded research on how misinformation online impacts important public health programs such as community water fluoridation and childhood vaccinations. She is a member of the American Public Health Association and the American Association of Public Health Dentistry where she holds a position with the Council on Practice. She is the Director of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health’s Global Oral Health Interest Group and was a contributing author to the FDI World Dental Federation’s Oral Health Atlas 2nd Edition. Dr. Seymour has won numerous honors and awards, including the Award for Community Dentistry and Dental Public Health and the Herschel St. Horowitz scholarship by the American Association of Public Health Dentistry, and an Outstanding Achievement in Teaching Award from HSDM.

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Webinar: Making Solar More Accessible Through Innovation 
Tuesday, May 10
2:00pm EST/11:00am PST

Join us as SolarRoofHook.com shares its insights into reducing costs of solar installation with the QuickBolt and innovative Roof Hooks, derived from 30 years of experience in the woodworking industry.
Attend this webinar to learn:
Why SolarRoofHook.com believes innovation is the key to making installation easier
How innovative screw designs make solar installation easier
What innovations have been made in order to make the 100% waterproof Quickbolt, for installations on Asphalt Shingle

Featured Speaker
Mike Wiener, Marketing Manager, SolarRoofHook.com
Mike Wiener is the Marketing Manager for SolarRoofHook.com. Mike uses his Bachelor’s of Arts in Psychology in addition to his film/music production experience to create engaging and innovative marketing material for the Solar Industry.

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How Much Is One American Worth? A Lecture by Diana C. Mutz
WHEN  Tue., May 10, 2016, 4:15 p.m.
WHERE  Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Knafel Center, 10 Garden Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study
SPEAKER(S)  Diana C. Mutz, Samuel A. Stouffer Professor of Communication and Political Science at the Annenberg School for Communication and the Department of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS  Economic globalization remains extremely controversial in the United States and elsewhere. Nonetheless, opinions do not fall along recognizable partisan lines. In her current research, Mutz uses surveys and experimental designs to explore the psychological, political, economic, and philosophical underpinnings of American attitudes toward globalization policies, such as international trade and outsourcing.
Mutz finds that trade attitudes have more to do with peoples’ attitudes toward the value of cooperation versus competition and on general sentiment toward citizens of other countries. This evidence highlights Americans’ differential valuation of human lives.
Register online.

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Institute for Applied Computational Science Project Showcase
Tuesday, May 10
5:30-7:00 p.m.
Harvard, Northwest Building Cafe, 52 Oxford Street, Cambridge

Come mingle with faculty and friends of IACS while you learn about the cutting edge work of our master's and secondary field students!

Refreshments will be served.

RSVP to IACS Program Manager, Sheila Coveney at coveney@seas.harvard.edu

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Boston New Technology May 2016 Startup Showcase #BNT65
Tuesday, May 10
6:00 PM to 9:00 PM
WeWork (South Station), 745 Atlantic Avenue, Boston

Come to our check-in desk in the lobby. Type the first few letters of your first or last name on the screen and once you see your name appear, tap on it to print your name tag. Then, take an elevator to the 8th floor.

Free event! Come learn about 7 innovative and exciting technology products and network with the Boston/Cambridge startup community!   

Each presenter gets 5 minutes for product demonstration and 5 minutes for Q&A.

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Changing America - Twenty Years of Democracy Now!
Tuesday, May 10
6.30 pm
First Parish, 1446 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge 

Renowned journalist, Amy Goodman with her new book, "CHANGING AMERICA - TWENTY YEARS OF DEMOCRACY NOW!"  Amy co-authored the book with  Denis Moynihan, and her brother David Goodman. The event will mark the last in our current run of programs before we start planning our new schedule for the fall.

More information at http://www.cambridgeforum.org

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Upcoming Events
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Wednesday, May 11
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Science, Religion, and Culture Symposium
WHEN  Wed., May 11, 2016, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Braun Room, Andover Hall, 45 Francis Avenue, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture
SPONSOR Science, Religion, and Culture at Harvard Divinity School
CONTACT Amanda Heffner-Wong
DETAILS  The symposium is SRC’s annual event highlighting the work of SRC Fellows and Research Associates.
Check back for more information.

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Sack Lunch Seminar Series (SLS) - Isabela Le Bras, MIT-WHOI
Wednesday, May 11
12:00pm to 1:00pm
MIT, Building 54-915 (the tallest building on campus), Cambridge
About the Speaker

Isabela Le Bras, MIT-WHOI
I am a Ph.D. candidate in the MIT-WHOI Joint Program in Physical Oceanography. Currently, my research focuses on the dynamics of western boundary currents in the North Atlantic: the Gulf Stream-North Atlantic Current system and the Deep Western Boundary Current as well as on the interaction of these two current systems. I use a combination of observations, theory and idealized modelling to do this work.

About this Series
The MIT Oceanography and Climate Sack Lunch Seminar Series [SLS] is a student-run weekly seminar series. Topics include research relating to climate (especially where it concerns interactions with the ocean or sea-ice), geophysical fluid dynamics, biogeochemistry, paleo-oceanography / climatology and physical oceanog

Event website:  http://bit.ly/1RQpuuO

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Book Talk: The New Arab Wars: Uprising and Anarchy in the Middle East
WHEN  Wed., May 11, 2016, 4 – 5:30 p.m.
WHERE  Harvard, Allison Dining Room, Taubman Building, Fifth Floor, 15 Eliot Street, Cambridge
GAZETTE CLASSIFICATION Lecture, Social Sciences
ORGANIZATION/SPONSOR The Middle East Initiative
SPEAKER(S)  A discussion with Marc Lynch, Professor of Political Science at George Washington University and Director of the Project on Middle East Political Science, on his upcoming book The New Arab Wars: Uprisings and Anarchy in the Middle East (Amazon, Public Affairs).
Moderated by Tarek Masoud, Sultan of Oman Associate Professor of International Relations, Harvard Kennedy School.
COST  Free and open to the public
DETAILS  How did the enthusiasm of the Arab uprising of 2010-11 descend into failed states, repression, and proxy war? The New Arab Wars explains the new power politics and human costs of a Middle East still undergoing profound transformations.

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ClimateX Ideamaker Lab
Wednesday, May 11
6:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
MIT, Building 9-450A, 105 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

The challenge of climate change requires systemic innovation at every level of human existence- new science, new technology, new infrastructure, new economics, new policy and a new ethics. The ClimateX Ideamaker Lab focuses on fresh ideas; think about it as an incubator for climate solutions. Our goal is to create a supportive environment for unveiling bold new steps for addressing the climate crisis independent of where they come from.
Our Ideamaker Lab combines the sharing of ideas with networking and building of community. In the first Ideamaker Lab session is the presentation of ClimateX itself as a hub for green learning and careers that seeks to use information technology as a vehicle for delivering "climate thinking" at scale.
We welcome your participation in the first ClimateX Ideamaker session. Please do forward this invite to anyone who might be interested in attending. 

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The Big Picture:  On the Origins of Life, Meaning, and the Universe Itself
Wednesday, May 11
7:00 PM 
Harvard Book Store, 1256 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge

Sean Carroll
Already internationally acclaimed for his elegant, lucid writing on the most challenging notions in modern physics, Sean Carroll is emerging as one of the greatest humanist thinkers of his generation as he brings his extraordinary intellect to bear not only on Higgs bosons and extra dimensions but now also on our deepest personal questions. Where are we? Who are we? Are our emotions, our beliefs, and our hopes and dreams ultimately meaningless out there in the void? Does human purpose and meaning fit into a scientific worldview?

In short chapters filled with intriguing historical anecdotes, personal asides, and rigorous exposition, readers learn the difference between how the world works at the quantum level, the cosmic level, and the human level—and then how each connects to the other. Carroll's presentation of the principles that have guided the scientific revolution from Darwin and Einstein to the origins of life, consciousness, and the universe is dazzlingly unique.

Carroll shows how an avalanche of discoveries in the past few hundred years has changed our world and what really matters to us. Our lives are dwarfed like never before by the immensity of space and time, but they are redeemed by our capacity to comprehend it and give it meaning.

The Big Picture is an unprecedented scientific worldview, a tour de force that will sit on shelves alongside the works of Stephen Hawking, Carl Sagan, Daniel Dennett, and E. O. Wilson for years to come.

More information at (617) 661-1515 or info@harvard.com 

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Thursday, May 12
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A New Era? Global Climate Protection Efforts After the Paris Climate Summit
Thursday, May 12
12:00 PM to 2:00 PM (EDT)
Goethe-Institut Boston, 170 Beacon Street, Boston
Cost:  $0 – $11.54

Talk by David Klingenfeld

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Science by the Pint: Why Were Early Humans Successful and Other Hominins Not?
Thursday, May 12
6:30 PM
Aeronaut Brewery, 14 Tyler Street, Somerville

Guest scientist Christian Tryon
Christian Tryon is a Paleolithic archaeologist in the Department of Anthropology at Harvard University. He is interested in the behavioral evolution of Homo sapiens and the role that archaeology can play in understanding the evolutionary success of our species. His primary research area is eastern Africa, where he has directed a number of field projects in Kenya since 2001. Dr. Tryon's current research focuses on the co-variation of ancient environments and human behavior. He is particularly interested in the analysis of stone tools and what they tell us about human behavior and the environment, as well as modern human dispersals across and out of Africa.

Science by the Pint is a monthly science cafe free and open to the public, run by the Harvard non-profit outreach group Science In The News (SITN). Read more here: http://sitnboston/science-by-the-pint/

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Aquarium Lecture Series: Ocean Country: Hope for the Seas
Thursday, May 12
7:00 PM to 8:00 PM (EDT)
New England Aquarium, 1 Central Wharf, Boston

Liz Cunningham, author and environmental activist
*Book signing to follow
Ocean Country, by Liz Cunningham, with a foreword by Carl Safina, is an adventure story and a meditation on the state of the seas. Most of all it is the story of finding true hope in the midst of urgent environmental crises.

After a near-drowning accident in which she was temporarily paralyzed, Liz Cunningham crisscrosses the globe in an effort to understand the threats to our endangered oceans. This intimate account charts her thrilling journey through unexpected encounters with conservationists, fishermen, sea nomads, and scientists, in the Mediterranean, Sulawesi, the Turks and Caicos Islands, and Papua, New Guinea. Join us to hear Cunningham share stories and photographs about the amazing people she met, who showed her what true hope can be.

Twenty-one percent of royalties from Ocean Country are being donated to the New England Aquarium’s Marine Conservation Action Fund (MCAF), which funds small-scale conservation projects around the world - from protecting manta rays in Peru to saving sea turtles in Florida and Costa Rica. MCAF Manager, Elizabeth Stephenson, will also share remarkable stories of hope for the oceans that have been catalyzed by this long-standing micro-funding program.

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Value of Solar/Distributed Energy Resources
Thursday, May 12 
Doors open at 7:00 p.m.; Presentation begins at 7:30 p.m
First Parish in Cambridge Unitarian Universalist;  3 Church Street, Harvard Square

The Boston Area Solar Energy Association is proud to welcome Karl Rabago, known as the foremost national authority on Value of Solar calculation methodology. Our Net Metering Solar Task Force's first recommendation called for a Value of Solar study to inform fair compensation for solar energy production by tying it to the real "value and impact of solar in Massachusetts". This is where solar policy is going, graduating from arbitrary one-for-one kilowatt-hour compensation - as if a clean energy kilowatt-hour has no more value than one generated burning polluting fossil fuels.

A weak solar bill just passed (April 11th), granting an anemic raise in net metering caps, which unfortunately lasted only 2 weeks and 3 days until the cap was hit once again (April 28th), while also slashing compensation for low income and community shared solar projects. Next, the legislature plans to craft an 'omnibus energy bill', figuring it had got solar out of the way. Can we move to inject the sanity of Value of Solar (Distributed Generation) into this omnibus bill?

Karl Rabago has a knack for cutting through complexity to clearly and concisely present the broad view of how distributed energy resources are integrated from an economic and ratepaying perspective, honed through deep career experience in utility systems and policy work. (View Mr. Rabago's recent address to the Rhode Island state legislature for a primer,  here.)  Proper valuation of distributed energy resources is essential to the health of the new energy economy, as we transition from fossil fuel based centralized generation to add more and more local, clean energy.

Karl R. Rábago is the Executive Director of the Pace Energy and Climate Center, at the Pace Law School in White Plains, New York. The PECC mission is to protect the earth's environment through solutions that transform the ways that society supplies and consumes energy. Karl has some 25 years experience in energy and climate policy markets. Karl serves as Chair of the Board of the Center for Resource Solutions, a San Francisco-based non-governmental organization that works to advance voluntary clean energy markets. He also sits on the Board of the Interstate Renewable Energy Council (IREC). Karl also is co-director and principal investigator for the Northeast Solar Energy Market Coalition, a US DOE SunShot Initiative Solar Market Pathways project.

His past positions include Commissioner, Texas Public Utility Commission; Deputy Assistant Secretary at the US Department of Energy; Vice President of Distributed Energy Services at Austin Energy; Director of Regulatory Affairs for the AES Corporation and AES Wind; and Managing Director & Principal of the Rocky Mountain Institute. A graduate of Texas A&M University with a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in Business Management, Karl is an attorney (University of Texas Law School, J.D. with Honors) with post-doctorate degrees in environmental (LL.M., Pace University School of Law) and military law (LL.M., US Army Judge Advocate General's School). A veteran of more than 12 years in the US Army, he served as an Armored Cavalry officer and member of the Judge Advocate General's Corps, and is Airborne and Ranger qualified.

Please Join Us!  Donations, membership and http://ClimateRide.org support BASEA.
The Boston Area Solar Energy Association - http://www.BASEA.org

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Friday, May 13
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Approaching the Anthropocene: Perspectives from the humanities and the sciences
Friday, May 13
3:00PM TO 4:30PM
Harvard, Fong Auditorium, Boylston Hall, Harvard Yard, Cambridge

HUCE hosts a  panel discussion on "Approaching the Anthropocene: Perspectives from the humanities and the sciences" featuring:
Pamela Templer, Biology, Boston University;
Fredrik Albritton Jonsson, History, University of Chicago;
Sophia Roosth, History of Science, Harvard University;
and Daniel Schrag, Earth and Planetary Sciences and Harvard University.

Contact Name:  Laura Hanrahan


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Sunday, May 15
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MIT SWAPFEST
Sunday, May 15
9:00a–2:00p
MIT, N4, Albany Garage and Lots, Albany Street, Cambridge

MIT's monthly Hi Tech, Computer, Electronics and Ham Radio Fleamarket. 
Buy Sell or Swap all things nerdly. 
Held the third Sunday of each month April thru October. 
Rain or Shine covered space is available for all sellers. 
In the Albany St Garage and adjacent lot. 
On Albany St between Mass Ave and Main St, Cambridge. 
$6 Buyers admission from 9AM to 2PM. 
$4 with MIT/ Harvard Student ID 
Free for MIT and Harvard Undergraduates with current ID

Web site: www.swapfest.us
Open to: the general public
Cost: $6 
This event occurs on the 3rd Sunday of every month through October 16, 2016.
Sponsor(s): MIT Radio Society, Electronic Research Society, MIT, UHF Repeater Assn. W1XM, MIT
For more information, contact:  Mitchell Berger
617-253-3776

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Monday, May 16
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Yemen’s Crisis and the U.S.-Saudi Arabia Alliance: A Lunch Discussion of the Yemen Human Rights Crisis
Monday, May 16
12:00 PM to 1:00 PM (EDT)
The Non Profit Building, East-side Conference Room 89 South Street, Boston

More and more people in the U.S. are asking tough questions about the U.S. alliance with Saudi Arabia.  Not only is Saudi Arabia’s monarchy engaged in brutal repression at home, but for the past year, the government has led a massive bombardment of its next-door neighbor Yemen.
It’s the war that no one is talking about.  Amidst an armed conflict with Houthi rebels, the Saudi Arabia-led bombardment has led to a massive crisis.  Thousands have been killed or injured, and over 2.5 million displaced.  Vast numbers of civilians have suffered.  Meanwhile, the Obama Administration has authorized the sale of over $1 billion in new bombs to Saudi Arabia. 

Amnesty International researchers have been on the ground in Yemen, taking the testimonies of civilians whose family members have been killed by Saudi Arabia-led unlawful strikes and mass bombardments.  AI researchers have discovered U.S.-designed bomb fragments amidst the rubble. 
Join us for a conversation about the war in Yemen, U.S. foreign policy, and what people in the U.S. can do about it.
Guest Speaker: Sunjeev Bery serves as Middle East North Africa Advocacy Director at Amnesty International USA. He lobbies government officials and diplomats on human rights concerns across the MENA region. He has testified before the U.S. Senate and briefed Members of Congress on the intersection of U.S. foreign policy and human rights.  He is a frequent guest commentator on major news media, including CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, BBC, Al Jazeera, Al Arabia, and Huffington Post Live.  His comments have appeared in a wide range of print media as well, including The New York Times, USA Today, Washington Post, AP, and international newspapers.

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xTalks: Report on the Online Education Policy Initiative
Monday, May 16
3:00p–4:00p
MIT, Building 4-270, 182 Memorial Drive (Rear), Cambridge

Speaker: Sanjay Sarma, Karen Willcox, Eric Klopfer
The Online Education Policy Initiative recently released its report: "Online Education - A Catalyst for Higher Education Reform". This xTalk will feature a panel comprised of the report's co-chairs Sanjay Sarma and Karen Willcox, and Eric Klopfer of the Internal Advisory Committee. Vijay Kumar will moderate. 

xTalks: Digital Discourses 
The xTalks series provides a forum to facilitate awareness, deep understanding and transference of educational innovations at MIT and elsewhere. We hope to foster a community of educators, researchers, and technologists engaged in developing and supporting effective learning experiences through online learning environments and other digital technologies.

For more information, please refer to the MIT News article.

Open to: the general public
Sponsor(s): xTalks: Digital Discourses, Office of Digital Learning
For more information, contact:  Molly Ruggles
617-324-9185

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Tuesday, May 17
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Mass Innovation Nights #86
Tuesday, May 17
6pm-8:30pm 
Google, 355 Main Street, 5th floor, Cambridge

We will be at Google in Cambridge for our second time, thanks Google for supporting the local innovation ecosystem!  Join us on May 17th at 6pm for "Innovation for Everyone - Products Addressing Diversity & Products from Diverse Launchers". Ten products will be on hand and showcasing! Note, it is not our usual Wednesday instead TUESDAY May 17th. 

Check out the new PRODUCTS and VOTE for your favorites - click on the words VOTE HERE (found on this page to the immediate left) and once on the product voting page, click LOVE IT (only four times)!
RSVP to attend the event on Tuesday, May 17th (free to attend and open to all)
See who else is planning on attending (click the ATTENDEES tab)  
Help spread the word - blog, tweet (using the #MIN86 hashtag), like and post!
Support local innovation -- network and have fun at the same time! Don't miss it -- 


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Opportunity
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On the weekend of July 16 & 17th at Microsoft NERD in Cambridge we will be having a weekend event centered around Application Programming Interfaces.  If you have a work or home project that leverages API's, and are interested in presenting, then please let me know.  Talks can be any length.  If that weekend does not work, please note that there will be evening lectures over the next few months on API's.

For those who are new to API’s, these are being leveraged across many industries, and as such this event will have workshops to help participants learn how to access API’s; as well as on creating “data products” whether blogs, web applications, or the like. The event will have a special track devoted to “Civic Tech” and “Citizen Data Science”. The Programmable Web site provides good coverage of API’s, and beyond that there are many sites focused on specific applications.

API Categories
Social Media Top Ten API’s (article and review)
Machine Learning APIs (article and review)
Music API’s from Music Machinery
Federal Government

Many thanks to Microsoft NERD for hosting us!!!  Please let me know if you have any questions, and/or are interested in giving a talk!
John Verostek:  johnverostek@yahoo.com

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CLIMATE SMART BOSTON
Climate Smart Boston is about getting public input on vulnerabilities and resources related to climate readiness and resilience in the City of Boston and surrounding region in order to more fully inform to the Climate Ready Boston and Imagine Boston 2030 planning processes.


Boston is striving to advance climate preparedness planning to produce resiliency initiatives that work together to address physical, social and environmental vulnerabilities in our communities. You can participate in this process and help shape the preparedness of the city in adapting to climate change. Boston is recognized as a world-class leader in climate resilience planning by the Rockefeller Foundation's 100 Resilient Cities initiative and was recognized at the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference with an award for "Smart Cities and Smart Community Engagement" by the C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group in Paris. Boston officials want to make sure the distinct needs of all neighborhoods are well understood as they plan to meet the climate challenges that will face our city in 2030 and beyond. Participate in Climate Smart Boston to play your part!

Three missions
Climate Smart Boston challenges you over three time-sensitive missions:
Mission 1: March 25 - April 1
Mission 2: April 1 - April 8
Mission 3: April 8 - April 15
Miss a mission? Don't worry, there's still plenty more to play!

This game has launched!
Sign up now, and get ready to plan your community! If you share this page with your friends, we'll get even more bright ideas on the table.

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The Summer of 2016 there will be a special issue of the journal Socialism and Democracy (http://sdonline.org/) on Energy Transition, with an emphasis on renewable energy, including wind, solar, and biomass.

We are looking for reviewers of one or more articles. We are also seeking people who could send us reviews of relevant books, for this issue.

Weimin Tchen

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Solarize Somerville is a go! 
Hello neighbors--
On this cold winter day, I'm delighted to share the sunny news that Somerville MA has been chosen by the MassCEC (Clean Energy Center) to be a Solarize Mass community! You can see the announcement here:
State energy officials today announced the selection of the first five communities to participate in Solarize Mass for 2016.  The new municipalities participating in the community-based solar energy group-buying program that lowers overall costs of installing solar electric systems include Somerville and Natick, as well as Shelburne, Colrain and Conway, which have joined as a trio of partner communities....

You can learn more about the MassCEC and the SolarizeMass program at: www.solarizemass.com .
As the announcement has just been made, we don't have a lot of additional information at this time. But this selection means that we can now work with the city and the state to help residents of Somerville to decide if solar is a suitable option for them and their homes or businesses. We'll be developing and sharing educational materials, we'll have events to help people learn more and get questions answered, and we will help people to understand the processes associated with generating local, artisanal electrons.

Officially I'm the "Solar Coach" for Somerville. I am a point of contact to help people with basic solar PV issues and incentives. I'm working with folks from the city who will manage the overall project. This is a joint effort by the Office of Sustainability and Environment, with director Oliver Sellers-Garcia, and the Office of Strategic Planning and Community Development with Russell Koty.

As a Coach, I am a volunteer organizer and am not authorized to speak as a spokesperson on behalf of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or MassCEC. My job is to help people to understand the program once it's in place, and to answer questions that my neighbors may have as they consider the options. Things outside of my wheelhouse will be directed to the folks who can answer them.

You can contact me here with questions, or soon we'll have some information resources with more details. If you might want to volunteer to be on the outreach team. let me know.

Mary Mangan
Solar Coach Volunteer
[vendors should not contact me, I'm not supposed to have contact with them prior to the proposal process]

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Where is the best yogurt on the planet made? Somerville, of course!
Join the Somerville Yogurt Making Cooperative and get a weekly quart of the most thick, creamy, rich and tart yogurt in the world. Membership in the coop costs $2.50 per quart. Members share the responsibility for making yogurt in our kitchen located just outside of Davis Sq. in FirstChurch.  No previous yogurt making experience is necessary.

For more information checkout.

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Cambridge Residents: Free Home Thermal Images
Have you ever wanted to learn where your home is leaking heat by having an energy auditor come to your home with a thermal camera?  With that info you then know where to fix your home so it's more comfortable and less expensive to heat.  However, at $200 or so, the cost of such a thermal scan is a big chunk of change.
HEET Cambridge has now partnered with Sagewell, Inc. to offer Cambridge residents free thermal scans.
Sagewell collects the thermal images by driving through Cambridge in a hybrid vehicle equipped with thermal cameras.  They will scan every building in Cambridge (as long as it's not blocked by trees or buildings or on a private way).  Building owners can view thermal images of their property and an analysis online. The information is password protected so that only the building owner can see the results.
Homeowners, condo-owners and landlords can access the thermal images and an accompanying analysis free of charge. Commercial building owners and owners of more than one building will be able to view their images and analysis for a small fee.
The scans will be analyzed in the order they are requested.
Go to Sagewell.com.  Type in your address at the bottom where it says "Find your home or building" and press return.  Then click on "Here" to request the report.
That's it.  When the scans are done in a few weeks, your building will be one of the first to be analyzed. The accompanying report will help you understand why your living room has always been cold and what to do about it.
With knowledge, comes power (or in this case saved power and money, not to mention comfort).

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Free solar electricity analysis for MA residents

Solar map of Cambridge, MA

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Hey Cambridge residents!

Did you know the City of Cambridge is trying to win the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize? It was created to develop a cleaner and more efficient energy future. Energy efficiency and conservation are the best ways to save energy and minimize environmental impact. In that effort, Cambridge is hoping all residents will get a no-cost energy assessment in order to make their homes more efficient and comfortable. Let us know you're interested here: http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/sign-up-for-an-assessment

During the assessment, the energy specialist will:
Install efficient light bulbs (saving up to 7% of your electricity bill)
Install programmable thermostats (saving up to 10% of your heating bill)
Install water efficiency devices (saving up to 10% of your water bill)
Check the combustion safety of your heating and hot water equipment
Evaluate your home’s energy use to create an energy-efficiency roadmap

Again, let us know you're interested here: http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/sign-up-for-an-assessment and someone will be in contact with you shortly to give you personally tailored contact information on how you can get your no-cost home energy assessment. Renters are also eligible!

Any action to save energy in the home will help Cambridge win this competition while protecting the environment. For additional ideas on how to save energy, please see the Cambridge Energy Alliance website at http://cambridgeenergyalliance.org/resources/interactivehome

Please share with your Cambridge friends and family and ask them to get a free energy assessment!

Want to be more involved? Become a neighborhood Block Captain! Block Captains help their community members sign up for and complete no-cost home energy assessments through the MassSave program. Our team will give you the tools and guidance needed to recruit neighbors to get an assessment and improve the efficiency of their homes. Participation is welcome at whatever level you are able to commit to.
If you are interested in becoming a Block Captain, please fill out the form at http://tinyurl.com/blockcaptainsurvey and someone from the Cambridge Energy Alliance will be in contact with you shortly. If you know someone who might be interested, please let them know about this opportunity!

Questions? Contact jnahigian@cambridgema.gov

Cambridge Energy Alliance
@cambenergy 

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Sunny Cambridge has just launched! Sunny Cambridge is the city-wide initiative that makes it easy for all types of residents to get solar power for their homes. Cambridge has lined up local solar installers through the EnergySage Solar Marketplace, which helps you request, receive, and compare solar quotes 100% online with support available every step of the way.
The City of Cambridge is working on many levels to reduce energy use and GHG emissions to make the city more sustainable. As a semifinalist in the nationwide competition for the $5 million Georgetown University Energy Prize, Cambridge Energy Alliance is encouraging residents to take actions to save energy, save money, and protect the environment. Get involved by signing up for a no-cost home energy assessment at the Cambridge Energy Alliance home page (www.cambridgeenergyalliance.org/winit)
and going solar at http://www.sunnycambridge.org 

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Resource
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Sustainable Business Network Local Green Guide
SBN is excited to announce the soft launch of its new Local Green Guide, Massachusetts' premier Green Business Directory!
To view the directory please visit: http://www.localgreenguide.org
To find out how how your business can be listed on the website or for sponsorship opportunities please contact Adritha at adritha@sbnboston.org

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Boston Food System
"The Boston Food System [listserv] provides a forum to post announcements of events, employment opportunities, internships, programs, lectures, and other activities as well as related articles or other publications of a non-commercial nature covering the area's food system - food, nutrition, farming, education, etc. - that take place or focus on or around Greater Boston (broadly delineated)."
The Boston area is one of the most active nationwide in terms of food system activities - projects, services, and events connected to food, farming, nutrition - and often connected to education, public health, environment, arts, social services and other arenas.   Hundreds of organizations and enterprises cover our area, but what is going on week-to-week is not always well publicized.
Hence, the new Boston Food System listserv, as the place to let everyone know about these activities.  Specifically:
Use of the BFS list will begin soon, once we get a decent base of subscribers.  Clarification of what is appropriate to announce and other posting guidelines will be provided as well.
It's easy to subscribe right now at https://elist.tufts.edu/wws/subscribe/bfs

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The Boston Network for International Development (BNID) maintains a website (BNID.org) that serves as a clearing-house for information on organizations, events, and jobs related to international development in the Boston area. BNID has played an important auxiliary role in fostering international development activities in the Boston area, as witnessed by the expanding content of the site and a significant growth in the number of users.
The website contains:
A calendar of Boston area events and volunteer opportunities related to International Development - http://www.bnid.org/events
A jobs board that includes both internships and full time positions related to International Development that is updated daily - http://www.bnid.org/jobs
A directory and descriptions of more than 250 Boston-area organizations - http://www.bnid.org/organizations
Also, please sign up for our weekly newsletter (we promise only one email per week) to get the most up-to-date information on new job and internship opportunities -www.bnid.org/sign-up
The website is completely free for students and our goal is to help connect students who are interested in international development with many of the worthwhile organizations in the area.
Please feel free to email our organization at info@bnid.org if you have any questions!

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BASEN / Boston Solidarity Network Economy:  http://ba-sen.tumblr.com
Bostonsmart.com's Guide to Boston:  http://www.bostonsmarts.com/BostonGuide/

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Links to events at over 50 colleges and universities at Hubevents:  http://hubevents.blogspot.com

Thanks to
Fred Hapgood's Selected Lectures on Science and Engineering in the Boston Area:  http://www.BostonScienceLectures.com
MIT Events:  http://events.mit.edu
Sustainability at Harvard:  http://green.harvard.edu/events
Microsoft NERD Center:  http://microsoftcambridge.com/Events/
Startup and Entrepreneurial Events:  http://www.greenhornconnect.com/events/
Cambridge Civic Journal:  http://www.rwinters.com
Cambridge Happenings:  http://cambridgehappenings.org

Cambridge Community Calendar:  https://www.cctvcambridge.org/calendar